Stories Of The Women and Men Lost On September 11/ Recommended Reading and Viewing from John J Hogan

By John J. Hogan, CHA CMHS CHE CHO
September 11, 2019

2001-2019 = 18 years of memories, lessons learned and values appreciated

I have re-posted this blog message several times because it should remain in our minds and hearts that we all need to pay attention to our role, values and place in history.

9-11 marked the first time the USA had been successfully attacked on its own soil in an undeclared war by terrorists and it changed the country forever in many ways. Innocent civilians of all religions, professions, ages and activities were affected in ways not imagined before.

I was with a  major hotel company on that day and my team and I were delivering a workshop out of state. The 100% closing of all airports nationwide, of some roads, and of many government and business centers was an eerie sensation for the week that followed.

In the years since that day, on those times when I am interacting with groups and others on September 11th, I make sure we take that moment of silence to remember and reflect.

I encourage you to watch the following You Tube and then read the short recap of real people’s lives that follow.

When the World Stopped Turning: A 9/11 tribute

Remember and Reflect

While this blog first was published several years ago,  the lessons we learned from each other and about inner strengths are worth another look.

American Lives: The Stories Of The Men And Women Lost On September 11

I have had this book for several years now – I found it at a used book sale. I almost passed it by, but was genuinely moved by the collection of personal stories complied by the staff of Newsday and the Tribune Company.   If you choose to pass on the book, I understand – it is not easy to keep returning to such a memory, but I strongly recommend you read the brief collection of thoughts below.

This is a mini-biography of some of the women and men who lost their lives on that day.  Some of what really moved me were the titles in the stories.  You will understand without even reading the full story:

  • Robert, there’s another plane coming
  • Dad, I gotta go. There’s smoke in here now
  • Take care of my kids
  • She still lives in his dreams
  • She opened up his world
  • A recovered ring completes a circle of life
  • He made every day a party
  • That day, she learned she was pregnant
  • After 20 years, they still held hands
  • A hero by any definition
  • He ignored his own order to flee
  • Firefighting was all he talked about
  • He dreamed of a school for autistic kids
  • She beat Hodgkin’s and eased others pains
  • Her family’s first college graduate
  • Death in a place of prayer
  • They knew what was important
  • She kept going back in
  • A rescuer who wouldn’t be stopped
  • A coach who brought out kid’s potential
  • Her husband watched her disappear
  • She tried to block the cockpit
  • The man who said “let’s roll”
  • He stayed to check on an elderly colleague
  • A cool army vet who helped others evacuate
  • He saved his wife, but not himself
  • A son is born as a father is mourned
  • and probably 200 more headings and stories

The book is only 200 pages in a slightly oversize format.  The five sections are to the point:

Little Brother, You’re MVP in our hearts, and as sub-sections includes
1. last phone calls
2. love stories
3. FDNY and
4. lost promises

The first into heaven
5. they died together
6. rescuers
7. mothers, fathers, sisters, brothers
8. on the planes

A Husband is Missing No More
9. High Finance
10. New Americans
11. In the Pentagon

A Man of Unusual Disposition
12. free spirits
13. tower people
14. legacies

The List of the Lost
World Trade Center Occupants
Pentagon
Emergency/Rescue Personnel
American Airline Flight #11 -WTC North Tower
United Airliners Flight #175 -WTC South Tower
American Airlines Flight # 77 – Pentagon
United Airlines Flight #93 – Pennsylvania

Comments and suggestions for future articles are always welcome john@hoganhospitality.com 

 

John J Hogan, CHA CMHS CHE CHO

Hotelier, Speaker, Educator, Author, Expert Witness

John@Hoganhospitality.com    Office 480-436-0283   Cell 602-799-5375

  Success does not come by accident or chance.

Contact us for assistance – John.Hogan@HospitalityEducators.com or 602-799-5375

Lodging Leaders Podcast Guest Blog: HOTEL CRIME- How to manage a high-profile case

Comments and suggestions for future articles are always welcome john@hoganhospitality.com 

 

John J Hogan, CHA CMHS CHE CHO

Hotelier, Speaker, Educator, Author, Expert Witness

John@Hoganhospitality.com    Office 480-436-0283   Cell 602-799-5375

Click below for a fascinating look at one of the most successful of all American Hospitality businesses

Howard Johnson’s, Host of the Bygone Ways

For more than seven decades American roads were dotted with the familiar orange roof and blue cupola of the ubiquitous Howard Johnson’s restaurants and Motor Lodges.  The company’s founder and namesake was a grade school dropout who became a franchising pioneer and introduced the restaurant industry to centralized purchasing.  Johnson repeated his formula with motor lodges, creating one of the world’s largest hotel chains.

In 1965 Howard Johnson’s sales exceeded the combined sales of McDonald’s, Burger King, and Kentucky Fried Chicken.  By 1979 the “Host of the Highways” had become the largest hospitality company in America, with more than 1,000 restaurants and 500 motor lodges.  But the company saw a decline of its rule over the roadways in the 1970s after a series of events destroyed the company’s earnings.
cover photo courtesy Ben Schumin

 

https://sometimes-interesting.com/2017/10/06/howard-johnsons-host-of-the-bygone-ways/ 

 

Howard Johnson first became locally famous for his ice cream.  He claimed the secret recipe came from his mother, while other accounts suggests it came from William G. Hallbauer, a retiring German immigrant who had been selling ice cream from his horse and cart in the area at the turn of the century.  The ‘secret’ was to double the amount of normal butterfat, and to use only natural ingredients.  This created a premium ice cream that was an immediate sensation and earned Howard $60,000 in revenue from his first beachfront stand.

An image accompanying a 1948 newpaper article shows Howard Johnson's 28 flavors at the time.An image accompanying a 1948 newpaper article shows Howard Johnson’s 28 flavors at the time (source).

Additional flavors were added – 28 in all – as well as “frankforts,” a premium hot dog sandwich developed by Howard that was grilled in butter.  Johnson clipped the frankfurters at both ends and notched them lengthwise.  He used only the highest quality meats grilled in a creamy butter, and for buns he used lightly buttered and toasted fresh rolls.

By 1928 Howard Johnson was grossing $240,000 from his store and small network of beachfront ice cream and frankfort vendors.

[ Howard Johnson’s original 28 ice cream flavors:  Banana, Black Raspberry, Burgundy Cherry, Butter Pecan, Buttercrunch, Butterscotch, Caramel Fudge, Chocolate, Chocolate Chip, Coconut, Coffee, Frozen Pudding, Fruit Salad, Fudge Ripple, Lemon Stick, Macaroon, Maple Walnut, Mocha Chip, Orange-Pineapple, Peach, Peanut Brittle, Pecan Brittle, Peppermint Stick, Pineapple, Pistachio, Strawberry, Strawberry Ripple, Vanilla.

MORE DETAILS HERE
https://sometimes-interesting.com/2017/10/06/howard-johnsons-host-of-the-bygone-ways/ 

Howard D. Johnson personally ensured quality by testing every item before it went on the menu.

Howard-Deering-Johnson-press-photo-1962-age-65                  Howard Johnson's, "Landmark for Hungry Americans" ad

 

 

Comments and suggestions for future articles are always welcome john@hoganhospitality.com 

 

John J Hogan, CHA CMHS CHE CHO

Hotelier, Speaker, Educator, Author, Expert Witness

John@Hoganhospitality.com    Office 480-436-0283   Cell 602-799-5375

A really great book on life for anyone – BUT ESPECIALLY FOR THOSE UNDER 50

HOW WILL YOU MEASURE YOUR LIFE

 

200 page book. 3 sections. 10 chapters.

 

Doesn’t sound that different from many others we may have read over the years, does it?

 

Yet, this one is.

 

 

 

This was on one of those lists from a podcast company saying it was one of the most important books ever written and they consolidated it into an 18 minute audio recap.  While I listen to CDs on various topics regularly, I still try to read two books a week to keep my mind active and open to new ideas.

This is not a typical “self-help” book. Many of them have some good points, but just as many focus on a single message, often leading to other products to buy.  Nothing wrong with that.

I have a great deal of respect for many University and college professors and was proud to be affiliated with the Council of Hotel, Restaurant and Institutional Educators (CHRIE) for 6 years with a professional membership. I taught at three different universities and colleges as an adjunct professor over a 20 year period.  An issue I have with a good number of institutions is the requirement for research and studies that do not have much practical application for most of us.

This book and these authors do not take that approach.

The primary author, Clayton Christensen begins with life observations that many of his classmates, despite many achievements, were clearly disappointed with their lives. What faces many of us – failed marriages, issues with family and the weakening of many personal relationships are briefly and well stated as indicators of serious issues that negatively affected lives.

For background, Christensen is not a typical professor.  He has been involved in many different business and industries.  He is an author of substance and practical application.   He recognized issues about success and failure and talks about them

He challenges his graduating students with 3 unassuming questions to examine, measure, and improve their lives after college:

(Note- these are my capsules, not his actual questions)

  1. How do I need to do be to have a successful and happy career?
  2. How do I maintain and strengthen my relationships with my spouse, my children and cherished friends for the benefit of all?
  3. How can I be an ethical person in these changing times of growing duplicity and deceit?

The authors examine how to think about life, what causes what to happen, and why.  There are business case studies throughout the book that demonstrate their points

The authors discuss:

  • priorities – many questions we have asked or should ask ourselves today to find success and happiness in  careers, in  relationships and how to listen to the right inner voice we all hear
  • Motivation and how to assess what is really important to us
  • Money as neither good or bad, but a potential problem when it displaces everything else
  • Assessing job choices and a list of great questions for all of us
  • How-to’s on building and maintaining strong personal relationships
  • Building internal and healthy cultures- business, personal and family
  • Defining our own personal purpose in life

I am a boomer and above that age I mentioned in the title, but I found this book thought provoking and interesting for self-assessment.  I recognized life stages I did very well, and others I wish I had do overs. I saw some stages where I corrected my course and as impotently how I was able to assist others as a mentor, a guide or simply a life friend.

I really enjoyed reading this very different point of view on do-it-yourself analysis.
“How Will You Measure Your Life?”

If you find this review useful, please let Amazon and me know by clicking the helpful button below!

John J Hogan, CHA CMHS CHE CHO

John@Hoganhospitality.com    Office 480-436-0283   Cell 602-799-5375

Hotelier, Speaker, Educator, Author, Expert Witness

 

A focused look at the path to success – recommended reading

This book is a good logic forward and rocks and Dan Heath, coauthor of SWITCH, who uses examples of how Chris Rock perfected his comedy routines through months of , at times, painful performances.

The premise of the book is based on fact and experience of shared by many of us. There are references to youth, including practice of learning piano, a new language and sports. A reality for many of us remains from those focused efforts to study and practice along the way.

The authors use examples of legendary college coach John Wooden of UCLA and his almost fanatical commitment and the definition of success. He found success come from “old fashioned, well orchestrated, intentionally executed, carefully planned practice.”

The book is not meant for athletic coaches, but rather primarily for teachers. The author identifies 42 separate rules that are brief and focused. They often use sports or youth images, but they are not about play.

The sections of the book are as follows, with each having 5 – 6 short sub headers or rules:

* Rethinking practice

* How to practice

* using modeling

* Feedback

* Culture of practice

* Post practice: making new skills stick

* The Monday morning test

I did not care for the information in appendix A or B. I was an adjunct professor for 20 years at three different colleges and have taught thousands of professional workshops and these activities were just not on target from my perspective.

The closing comments on the books back cover share some very positive messages. They remind us that while we live in competition loving culture, our success is very likely to come from practice more than from just games.

Recommended.

As always, feedback is appreciated.

John J Hogan, CHA CMHS CHE CHO

John@Hoganhospitality.com    Office 480-436-0283   Cell 602-799-5375

Hotelier, Speaker, Educator, Author, Expert Witness

A Different Type of Recommended Reading!

Younger Next Week: Your Ultimate Rx to Reverse the Clock, Boost Energy and Look and Feel Younger in 7 Days

 

This book is written by someone who has a different focus on diet, attitude and health. The author, Elisa Zied, MS, RD, CDN seems to target those of us over 40 who are looking to address their fitness, weight and approaches to health.

Younger Next Week: Your Ultimate Rx to Reverse the Clock, Boost Energy and Look and Feel Younger in 7 Days

The book is in 3 main sections:

1. 2 chapters of “check your vital signs”

2. 8 chapters of “the vitality program, with common sense answers and approaches on items from fats to vitamins to caffeine

3. 3 chapters of “vitality for life” that offer a weekly plan, recipes and menu ideas

There is a glossary and four appendixes that offer additional specific insights, mainly aimed at women.

My bride and partner called this a “solid reference book” that uses a point system for different food groups. Zied is a Registered Dietitian, and her book provides a resource of nutritional information. Rather than a system that counts calories in diets that seldom have lasting stamina, this approach tackles more on the values and results.

To the point and logical!

As always, feedback is appreciated.

John J Hogan, CHA CMHS CHE CHO

John@Hoganhospitality.com    Office 480-436-0283   Cell 602-799-5375

Hotelier, Speaker, Educator, Author, Expert Witness

For your reading consideration: Thoughtful and a Bit of Business History

For your reading consideration: Thoughtful and a Bit of Business History –             MAKING THE WORLD BETTER -the ideas that shaped a company & a century

I was surprised to see so many IBM retired and former employees reviewing and quoted in this book, but on reflection that makes sense. IBM for the past 100 years now has played a major role in the evolution of both US and global business history.

The book at times is a bit too anecdotal for the person who may not be a techie or who may not care about the details of some of the IBM story but overall it hits the mark.

In the three major sections, they cover:

1. The science – this is the pioneering segment of how to move from the incredible basics to the foundations of meaningful technology for the every day person.

2. Thomas Watson Sr had adopted the slogan “THINK” in 1911 and section 2 addresses the evolution of creating economic value from knowledge. IBM did not do everything “right” but they did help to create the concept of the modern corporation.

3.Making the World Better completes the circle and shares global stories of balancing business, values, ethics and profitability while dealing with governments and greed.

Regardless of how one feels about certain kinds of computers or high tech, this is worth the read.

As always, feedback is appreciated.

John J Hogan, CHA CMHS CHE CHO

John@Hoganhospitality.com    Office 480-436-0283   Cell 602-799-5375

Hotelier, Speaker, Educator, Author, Expert Witness

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