Insights of 10 Hospitality Professionals: Mentors and Counselors Come in All Sizes and Shapes

For those of us who have been in hospitality for more than 15 years or attended hotel school, the name Tony Marshall has familiarity to us in the area of hospitality law. His reputation as an effective communicator and keynote speaker introduced many of us to understanding what reasonable care meant and his unique brand of humor made him one of the industry’s most recognized names in the last 25 years of the 20th century.

Marshall passed away 10 years ago (December 2006), yet his work and memory linger with many. If one does an internet search on his name[1], the business side of his legacy remains evident.

This column is different, in that I asked the industry for some personal insights on Tony and how he affected them. I personally knew Tony in several ways: we both worked in the same small hotel (Bonnie Oaks Resort in Fairlee, VT) about 20 years apart and one of his best friends was Professor Steve Fletcher who was the department chair of the Hotel & Restaurant program at my alma mater, the University of Massachusetts. While Tony was almost always boisterous in public, I saw first-hand his human side when he was encouraging Steve Fletcher in the mid-1990s as he and his family were dealing with the final stages of Lou Gehrig disease.

[1] Remembering Tony Marshall, The Messenger of “Reasonable Care …http://www.hotel-online.com/News/PR2007_1st/Mar07_TMarshall.html


Thank you to Hotel Online, which originally shared this story on 1/4/17   https://hotel-online.com/press_releases/release/mentors-and-counselors-come-in-all-sizes-and-shapes 

Enjoy these examples of how Tony impacted others:

Doug Kennedy Kennedy Training Network www.KennedyTrainingNetwork.com Hollywood, FL 954.558.4777 doug.kennedy@kennedytrainingnetwork.com   

I will never forget the day I met Tony Marshall. At the time he was the Dean of the FIU School of Hospitality Management and also wrote a column for Hotel & Motel Management magazine. I was a 20 something entrepreneur with not much more than a wild dream to start a hotel training company.   A mentor of mine told me to reach out to prominent people in the industry to ask for advice, so I wrote a letter to Dr. Marshall. 

 A few days later I called his office. At the time most executives had gatekeepers and it was very hard to reach someone directly, but not Tony! He took my call on the first try. I asked if he might have a few moments in the near future to meet with me and he said “How about right now? Come on down.” I jumped in my car and drove down to his office on campus. 

I was SO nervous meeting such a prominent figure, but Tony right away made me feel at ease by joking around. When he came out into the waiting area I extended my hand but instead he grabbed my tie, turned it around to look at the label and said “Not bad, but you need to start buying better ties if you are going to make it in a hospitality career!” (This is advice that served me well I should add.)

Tony took nearly an hour out of his busy schedule to hear about my vision and review my carefully constructed business. After giving a long and thoughtful look, he responded that he did not think my business plan was going to be successful, as he thought I first needed more career experience. He then picked up the phone and after a brief chat handed it to me – it was a chance to interview for a job as the Director of Training for the Caribbean Hotel Association! Although it was a great opportunity, I turned down the job interview offer and thanked Tony for his advice, even though I was disappointed. On the way out he said encouragingly, “You are not the first person I told their plan wouldn’t work, and about 1 in 10 prove me wrong. Good luck in doing that young man!” 

About 10 years later when I had 45 employees working for my hotel training company I had another meeting with Tony to remind him that I proved him wrong, and he was very happy that I had done so!  Tony was a true hospitality superstar in every way.


Howard Feiertag, CHA CMP CHME Instructor at Virginia Tech and Higher Education Consultant Roanoke, VA (540) 231-9459 (mobile)  howardf@vt.edu  

Howard and Tony wrote feature columns in HMM for more than 20 years and they often appeared at the same brand, association or management company programs.   Tony had more than 400 columns over a 25 year period. Howard continues to publish his messages today and has more than 500 columns to date.

Tony was the best contributing editor of all the business trade publications as he was doing a monthly column for Hotel Motel Management magazine. He was always very articulate and humorous with his writings as well as with his speeches which he made frequently for the hotel industry. 

A wonderful person who is very much missed from all who knew him in our industry.


Rocco M. Angelo Associate Dean & E.M. Statler Professor Alumni Relations 

Florida International University, North Miami, FL 305.919.4500 angelor@fiu.com

Where do I begin with stories about Anthony Glade Marshall?

First Tony worked for me, then I for him as a faculty member at FIU’s School of Hotel Food and Travel Services, as it was known at first. When he became Dean of the School I was made Associate Dean & Chair. When he retired from FIU and joined the Educational Institute of the American Hotel & Lodging Association, publishers of my textbook, he became my publisher. Our business association and friendship spanned almost 35 years.

Shortly after Tony graduated from the University of Syracuse Law school, he was hired by the accounting and consulting firm Laventhol Horwath (L & H) where I was the manager of the hospitality consulting division in the New York City office. Some of the consulting assignments had a legal dimension that Tony was expected to address. It was one of my duties to familiarize him with the consulting practice by involving him in various assignments for which I was responsible. Our experiences together could fill a book; a cost study of the food service at a 1000 bed mental hospital, a study of food service at a University where we experienced a drug bust in the dormitory where we were quartered, among others.

As the L&H consulting business expanded so did the staff. In order to find the best and the brightest young candidates, we sent our consultants to the major hotel schools. Although I am a Cornell alumnus, I assigned Tony to the Cornell Hotel School and arranged for him to lecture in a class. Tony had established already his famous speaking style and I suggested to Dean Robert Beck that he sit in on the lecture. Dean Beck had to be out of town so he asked Assistant Dean Gerald Lattin to attend the class. Thus began the series of events that would bring Tony to Florida International University when Gerald Lattin became the founding Dean of the hospitality school and hired Tony to be his assistant.


Skip Stearns Co-Founder and Principal, Hotel Experts. LLC    http://www.thehotelexpertsllc.com/ Greater Boston Area 603-778-0110 Skip@THEHOTELEXPERTSLLC.com

Skip was a career hotelier with Dunfey (now Omni Hotels) before he and his brother Steve co-founded the Hotel Experts, LLC in 2002. The group works with experienced hotel experts (associate offices in six states) providing hospitality and hotel consulting, litigation support and impartial hotel expert witness research, reports and testimony.

Hi John:

What a great idea! I did not know Tony personally, but like many hoteliers of our time, I looked forward to every issue of H&MM. 

“At Your Risk” was usually the first place I turned to find the topic of the current issue, and the last article I read because I always enjoy saving the best for last.  

Tony’s experiences, lessons, humor and communications skills were fantastically relevant in an era when risk management was phenomenally undervalued. As hotel experts who focus on safety and security today, we find his column and textbooks still relevant, and wishing that more operators were familiar with Tony’s fabulous educational rants.


Al Hodge Implementation Project Lead at ADP Orlando, FL alhodge129@gmail.com  https://www.linkedin.com/in/al-hodge-4bb92a12  

Al was on the staff of the AH&LA Educational Institute for more than 20 years, servicing military education and major hotel brands in sales and support services.

Yes, I have a couple of Tony Marshall stories.

Tony was always more than just the President of EI – he genuinely cared about each member of his team.

After finishing the work at hand, he would draw us into his office for discussions on books and authors, ranging from the Harry Potter books to CS Lewis the author and he would, as usual, argue which were the better ones and why!

Many of the conversations we had were about life as opposed to work, which made me appreciate him as a human being.


Robert Rauch, CHA Chief Executive Officer RAR Hospitality San Diego, CA 858-239-1800 rauch@hotelguru.com www.rarhospitality.com   

John, I was a student at FIU when Tony Marshall was both Associate Dean of Hotel and Restaurant Management and Professor of Hospitality Law.

He convinced me to sign up and transfer from the University of Illinois in 1974 and was arguably my most influential professor through both undergraduate and graduate school though I had many great professors. He literally “lit the classroom on fire” to show us how quickly a restaurant can be destroyed by not taking “reasonable care” when serving table-side with a burner.

 His exams were difficult and required rigorous study. I learned so much from his class that despite not being an attorney, I taught Hospitality Law earlier in my teaching career, my long time parallel universe to being a hotelier. 

In my 40+ years in the hotel industry, there has not been one person who I have met who could more effectively capture an audience better than Tony Marshall. Many years ago, I almost had the guts to tell him, “Tony, I wish you did not smoke.” I always worried that he would get lung cancer. He will be missed for years and years.

 Bob


William D. Frye, Ph.D., CHE, CHO, CHIA Associate Professor and Program Coordinator – College of Hospitality & Tourism Management at Niagara University, New York                     Niagara University, New York 716-984-8274       wfrye@niagara.edu   

One of the classes Frye teaches is hospitality law @ Niagara.

He commented that “…YES I knew him, but not close. We interacted on several occasions and while we did not have a friendship, (more professional acquaintances), he was a GIANT of a man without a doubt.”


Steve Belmonte, CHA   CEO Vimana Franchise Systems, LLC Windermere, FL                      (407) 654-5540 Steve@VimanaFS.com www.VimanaFS.com    

As a former chairman of the Educational Institute and a long-time involved member of the AH&LA, I knew Tony Marshall very well. He had a genuine passion for what he did and had a grounded belief in the power of education. 

Tony and I would often discuss an issue which remains prevalent today. We, in the hospitality industry, do not get our fair share of the bright young people out there; they are simply going to other industries. So many young people look at the hospitality industry as a dead-end job.

I would like to propose this. A formal college education may not be in the stars for everyone for various reasons, however, the hotel and restaurant industries are the last of the giant industries in which a formal education is not a prerequisite for success. A man or woman can achieve enormous success through hard work and perseverance.

What we need to do more as an industry is to tell our story to the young people. The owners, general managers and hospitality executives need to let the young people know they were not born with a silver spoon in their mouth. A substantial number of successful hospitality people today started at the very bottom and worked their way up.

Many, many general managers crossed over from management into ownership at some point. That is an incredible and motivating story to tell. If you need an example, look no further than myself. I did not graduate from college. I started on Mannheim Road in Chicago at the age of 16 as a desk clerk for $2.20 an hour. I moved up to assistant manager, eventually director of food & beverage, then as the youngest general manager in the history of Holiday Inn when I become the general manager of the Holiday Inn O’Hare Airport. Through hard work, creative marketing and building solid relationships with my employees, I continued to grow and eventually became president and CEO of one of the top ten management companies in the nation and then president and CEO of the Ramada brand and now currently CEO and owner of Vimana Franchise Systems which owns the Centerstone Hotel brand, the Key West Inn brand, and the Independent Collection by Vimana.

Love for the industry, passion, hard work, will take you to places you could not imagine. The hotel and restaurant industry is alive and well. We just need more leaders to get out and tell their story.


    This hospitality law book is one of the most used in hotel schools in the US. It is co-authored by UMASS professor Norman Cournoyer (my undergraduate advisor), Anthony Marshall and Karen Morris who has the final story about Tony.

Karen Morris Professor of Law at Monroe Community College Judge, Brighton Town Court https://www.linkedin.com/in/karen-morris-7281041b    

Tony Marshall was one-of-a kind. A consummate story teller and presenter, his style was nothing short of flamboyant, mesmerizing, great fun, and very effective. Audience members did not soon forget his message. Here’s one of my favorite examples. 

Tony was everyone’s favorite speaker at annual conferences of the Council on Hotel Restaurant and Institutional Education (CHRIE), a national gathering of Hospitality Professors to explore new developments in the field. One year the title of Tony’s presentation was reported in the conference program as, “Don’t Mow Your Lawn on Friday Afternoon.” Attendees scratched their heads – what could he possibly be planning to discuss?? After much buzz, the date and time for the speech arrived. With curiosity peaked, the audience was in his palm before he even began. 

Turns out, the topic was exactly what the title described. He was concerned that professors have a bad reputation because their job is viewed by many as cushy with sweetheart hours. He knew the reputation was not accurate. While the hours are indeed long for the research portion of the job, they are somewhat flexible which can be misleading. Tony, as a true admirer of both the hospitality field and hospitality education, sought to avoid any taint to either. The speech discouraged any action that would smirch either profession, including conduct by practitioners that suggests an abundance of leisure time that makes on-looking neighbors envious. Save those household chores for weekends and evenings.

I have long admired Tony’s commitment to advancing the field of hospitality evidenced so exquisitely in that speech. Love you Tony!  


 

Marshall’s professional contributions to the industry continue to be noted with an annual award given at the Hospitality Law Conference held each year in Houston, this year April 24-26, 2017. http://hospitalitylawyer.com/conference-awards/

The Anthony G. Marshall Hospitality Law Award is given in recognition of pioneering and lasting contributions to the field of hospitality law. HospitalityLawyer.com Founder, Stephen Barth, says, “We honor Anthony Marshall for his pioneering and continued contributions to the field of hospitality law. He was the first to define reasonable care in a way that the average hotel manager, who is not a lawyer, could understand.”


Closing thought:

Tony proved he could communicate to hoteliers effectively through his writings and workshops, but he wanted to prove to the industry and academia that professors could actually run profitable hospitality businesses.

It was for this reason, Tony shared with me one time, that he actively sought the Presidency and leadership role of the AH&LA Educational Institute.   During his time there from the 1990s through 2005, his leadership significantly reduced EI’s debt, increased the revenue stream and created new and updated products by actively working with industry both domestically and internationally.

The number of people who specifically remember him diminishes with time, yet Marshall left a legacy that continues to positively impact us.  His active mentoring and supporting others, whether they were students, business team mates, brand executives or personal friends, made a difference.

I recall one of his favorite sayings was “You’re a good man (woman), and he’d use your name!”

Thank you for your lessons and wisdom, Tony, and you were a very good man!


All rights reserved by John Hogan and this column may be included in an upcoming book on hotel management. This article may not be reproduced without the expressed permission of the author.

The opinions expressed in this article are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the views of this publication.

Tags: tony marshallanthony marshallanthony marshall award

About John J. Hogan

John J. Hogan   John J. Hogan, CHA CMHS CHE CHO[2] is a successful hospitality executive, educator, author and consultant and is a frequent keynote speaker and seminar leader at many hospitality industry events. He is Co-Founder and Chief Learning Officer of HospitalityEducators.com, which was founded in 2010 as a solutions center for hotel owners and managers. He is also the Principal of HoganHospitality.com, which offers hotel expert witness services and hospitality consulting.

He is currently working with his partner Kathleen Hogan and others on several new projects including the HOTELIERMASTERMIND series, an eBook series with Howard Feiertag on hotel sales, two new web sites and a fresh set of Keynote and Workshop programs, hospitality services and columns.


[2] Certified Hotel Administrator (CHA), Certified Master Hotel Supplier (CMHS), Certified Hospitality Educator (CHE), Certified Hotel Owner (CHO)

Contact: John Hogan John@HoganHospitality.com / 602-799-5375

An Open Invitation to Share Your Best Stories About One of Hospitality’s Most Unique and Interesting Personalities!

By John Hogan

The hotel industry is one that involves a serious financial commitment that is complemented by the fact this is a people business requiring 24 hours a day of attention.  In businesses that never close, there are many issues that involve following legal statutes and codes, brand standards, industry best practices and even common sense.

Tony Marshall was the embodiment of an educator who crossed the line from Academic Educator to Corporate Conscience in the ways he helped define the common sense approach to reasonable care by his ongoing work.

Marshall was best known for his involvement initially as Dean of the School of Hospitality Management at Florida International University in Miami for more than two decades. During this tenure, he became well known to many hoteliers as a columnist and keynote speaker.  It was in his communication venues to industry that he shared diverse ideas that assisted many hotels try to focus on the everyday challenges.

Wanting to demonstrate that an academic could succeed in business, Marshall successfully addressed the financial and practical issues facing AH&LA’s Educational Institute as CEO in the early 2000s.

There are 1000s of students and graduates of the FIU program who likely remember his lectures or assignments.  I personally know he wrote more than 400 columns for one of the major hospitality magazine over a 20 year period and two books.  He delivered hundreds of workshops to industry and academic groups, with a balance of wit and some sarcasm but always with the goal of helping each of us to individually increase their knowledge and success.

Marshall passed away ten years ago (December 2006).   As one who recalls the impact of his messages, I invite readers of this online service who either personally knew Tony, or was impacted by his work or who simply has a personal story to share to do so.

Hospitality is natural home for storytelling.  Please share your Tony Marshall story with me by 12/20/16, so we can all have one more collective smile.   We hope to compile them for publication by 12/29/16.

Please send them to John.Hogan@HospitalityEducators.com.


All rights reserved by John Hogan and this column may be included in an upcoming book on hotel management. This article may not be reproduced without the expressed permission of the author.

The opinions expressed in this article are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the views of this publication.

About John J. Hogan

John J. Hogan, CHA CMHS CHE CHO[1] is a successful hospitality executive, educator, author and consultant and is a frequent keynote speaker and seminar leader at many hospitality industry events.  He is Co-Founder and Chief Learning Officer of HospitalityEducators.com, which was founded in 2010 as a solutions center for hotel owners and managers. He is also the Principal of HoganHospitality.com, which offers hotel expert witness services and hospitality consulting.

He is currently working with his partner Kathleen Hogan and others on several new projects including the HOTELIERMASTERMIND series, an eBook series with Howard Feiertag on hotel sales, two new web sites and a fresh set of Keynote and Workshop programs, hospitality services and columns.


[1] Certified Hotel Administrator (CHA), Certified Master Hotel Supplier (CMHS), Certified Hospitality Educator (CHE), Certified Hotel Owner (CHO)

Contact: John Hogan

John@HoganHospitality.com / 602-799-5375

Do you know what is very likely your biggest problem area in your hotel?

Do you know how to deal with your biggest point of pain?

Working with a select group of hospitality professionals this past year, we found out the answers to both questions. The Hotelier Mastermind formed in early 2016 to identify and resolve problem areas facing hoteliers today. At it’s core, the Hotelier Mastermind includes John Hogan, Kathleen Hogan, Tim Danyo and Jon Albano.

John and Kathleen are the Co-Founders of HospitalityEducators.com, a hotel consulting resource for hospitality professionals focused on making hotels more profitable. Kathleen is the CEO and John is the Chief Learning Officer. Among other things, Hospitality Educators is the creator and facilitator of the AAHOA Leadership Gold CHO Program. John is a expert witness and industry resource.

Tim is a film maker, an educator, and an entrepreneur, and he’s the Founder and CEO of the video production company ImaginationMedia.tv.

Jon Albano is the Founder and CEO of the LodgingMetrics dashboard for hotels, and host of the the Lodging Leaders podcast. For more than 13 years, Jon defined Membership Services for AAHOA, with more than 15,000 members owning more than 20,000 hotels that total $128 billion in property value. As Vice President of Membership, he oversaw Membership, Education, Public Relations & Communications, and Information Technology departments.

At the beginning of this year, the four of us partnered together to form the Hotelier Mastermind – a carefully selected “think tank” of leading hospitality professionals – to help us identify the biggest challenges hoteliers face today, and utilize the collective intelligence of the group to solve them.

We Talk About …

  • The mastermind process, what a mastermind group is, and the criteria we used to carefully select the right participants to help us.
  • The problem we uncovered of finding and keeping quality hotel associates, how we went about validating it, and what we learned about the cause.
  • How to source top talent
  • How to winnow the list of candidates
  • How to effectively interview
  • How to on-board and orient your new hires
  • How to keep the A Players for the long haul

If you’ve listened to previous Lodging Leaders podcasts, then you know they constantly offer practical, actionable advice to listeners, and The Hotelier Mastermind agreed to share a lot of what was learned for FREE.

Over the next couple of weeks, The Hotelier Mastermind will be sharing a FREE 3-VIDEO TRAINING COURSE, including downloads, and details for upcoming webinars.

We’re going to start sending out the content this coming Monday, October 31, and it won’t be available anyplace else, so go ahead and sign up now…..you won’t be disappointed.

Eight Gifts (of Value) You Can Give Away, Which Will Not Cost You a Cent | Guest Blog – HospitalityEducators.com

Eight Gifts (of Value) You Can Give Away,  Which Will Not Cost You a Cent

1. THE GIFT OF LISTENING 
But you must REALLY listen.
No interrupting, no daydreaming, no planning your response. Just listen.

2. THE GIFT OF AFFECTION 
Be generous with appropriate hugs, kisses, pats on the back and handholds. Let these small actions demonstrate the love you have for family and friends.

3. THE GIFT OF LAUGHTER 
Clip cartoons. Share articles and funny stories.
Your gift will say, “I love to laugh with you.”

4. THE GIFT OF A WRITTEN NOTE 
It can be a simple “Thanks for the help” note or a full sonnet. A brief, handwritten note may be remembered for a lifetime, and may even change a life.
 

5. THE GIFT OF A COMPLIMENT 
A simple and sincere, “You look great in red,” “You did a super job,” or “That was a wonderful meal,” can make someone’s day.

6. THE GIFT OF A FAVOR 
Every day, go out of your way to do something kind.

7. THE GIFT OF SOLITUDE 
There are times when we want nothing better than to be left alone. Be sensitive to those times and give the gift of solitude to others.
 

8. THE GIFT OF A CHEERFUL DISPOSITION 
The easiest way to feel good is to extend a kind word to someone. Really it’s not that hard to say “Hello”  or “Thank You.”


Friends are rare jewels indeed. 

  They make you smile and encourage you to succeed. 

They lend an ear, share a word of praise, and always want to open their hearts.

 

Dr. Marc Clark, CHA, CHRE, CHE, CHO,
President & CEO at SmartBizzOnLine.com

Hotel Owners Linking Higher Yield from More Personalized, Direct Selling – The Best of David Brudney

While some things change in hotels, certain fundamentals remain intact.

Enjoy this Guest blog re-posting from the BEST OF DAVID BRUDNEY

Hotel Owners and Operators Expecting Higher Yield from Increases in More Personalized, Direct Selling Expenses


REPOSTED JULY 2016

While sales and marketing-related labor costs have experienced moderate growth and advertising has declined, more dollars are being directed to “Selling” expenses, according to a recent article by PKF Consulting (“Focus of Hotel Sales Personnel to Shift from Selling Room Nights to Capturing More Dollars”, by Robert Mandelbaum and Viet Vo).

 “If you’re selling a service, you’re selling a relationship”
Harry Beckwith

“Selling” expenses – – trade shows, travel, and prospect and client entertainment – – grew 9.2 percent in 2006, by far the largest increase of all major cost categories for sales and marketing departments, according to the PKF article.

What this information suggests is that maybe hotel owners and operators have rediscovered the importance and value of more personalized direct selling as a means to increasing revenue through higher average daily rates.

And doesn’t it suggest also that after investing millions of dollars in new technology, embracing state-of-the-art CRM, Sales and catering software and group database programs, managing the Internet distribution channels better and creating powerful, interactive websites and blogs, focus may be shifting now from technology based selling back to relationship based selling?

If so, hallelujah!  A primary message repeated in so many past articles of mine has been the concern I have over an entire new generation of hospitality sales professionals that have mastered the art of technology based selling while forsaking the timeless skills required in relationship based selling.

“Only a computer wants to do business with another computer.  People respond to people”   Harvey Mackay  

We’ve created a generation that prefers e-mails over phone calls, text messaging over personal sales calls and computer time over trade shows and travel.

E-mails and text messaging have become a necessity in all of our business and social lives.  No argument here.

But today’s direct sales teams must be adept at leveraging the value and impact of all of these communication and data exchange tools – – technology and relationship based – –  and understand when and where best to employ each.

Now that hotels have re-staffed their sales force “in an effort to capture group business and implement yield management strategies,”  according to PKF, I believe that owners, asset managers and operators will be looking to the direct sales teams to drive even higher group room rates in 2008.

This will pose no small challenge now with supply having caught up with demand and meeting planners, eager for the pendulum to swing back to more of a buyers’ market, having grown tired of paying top rates with fewer options.

 

Owners and operators’ expectations will be high and scrutiny will be intense.  There will be little, if any, patience or tolerance for direct sales teams that continue discounting practices to book group business.

Will direct sales teams respond to the challenge?  Have too many become too comfortable during the prolonged sellers’ market of recent years?  Have too many become too reactive and less proactive?  Have too many lost that selling “edge”?

The true test might be which sales departments have the experience and skills required to capture higher rates?  Which sales teams have benefitted from management’s commitment to advanced professional sales training during the recent span of high profits?

Let the real selling begin.

 

By David M. Brudney, ISHC, December 2007

© Copyright 2007

David M. Brudney, ISHC, a nationally recognized spokesman for hotels and a veteran with four decades of experience, is the principal of David Brudney & Assoc. of Carlsbad, CA

David Brudney & Associates- Hospitality Marketing Consultants

 

Nothing Changes Until You Do

Good lessons – recommended reading over a two week period, in small tastes and taking time to sink in.   This book is a series of contrasts.

 

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The contrasts are an evolution of time and are generally positive and to the point.

I am not familiar with the career of Mike Robbins as a ballplayer, but it can be interesting to see the world from a different profession than our own. Some can say that most readers don’t really care about his ego and success in baseball, yet we all care about our life story and that is what we know about.

The author’s writings style uses an easy to read format and the chapters are short and bite sized. This is a book from Hay House publishing and one can see the values and approach that many of their authors use.

In particular, I like the following chapters
* Chapter one – focus on what really matters
* Chapter six – ask for help
* Chapter seven – don’t get caught in the trap of comparison
* Chapter 10 – don’t take yourself too seriously
* Chapter 13 – give yourself permission to make mistakes
* Chapter 17 – remember that it’s not the circumstances, it’s you
* Chapter 18 – appreciate people
* Chapter 20 – give yourself permission to cry
* Chapter 24 – practice gratitude
* Chapter 27 – remember that you are much more than what you do
* Chapter 31 – be easily amazed
* Chapter 37 – focus on what you can control
* Chapter 40 – live like you’re going to die (because you are someday)

I read two books a week, with one novel and one for something to expand my mind in a different direction. I doubt if there is much information in this book that many of us have not been exposed to previously, yet we all realize that we must keep repeating the lessons that are hard for us to learn if we are to gain from their strength.

This is a good book and a recommended reading over a two week period, in small tastes and taking time to sink in.

John Hogan, CHA CHMS CHE CHO
HospitalityEducators
Hogan Hospitality

11 Lessons in Leadership from the Greatest Winner in the 20th Century

The 2016 NBA championship has concluded and the Cleveland Cavaliers have been able to bring home a “best of category” for the 1st time in sports in five decades. The Minnesota Lynx are the current WNBA champions.

Russell Rules This book was written by a professional who is the Greatest Team Champion in the 20th Century in ALL sports.

The messages are all about: Team, Leadership and Accountability

RECOMMENDED READING – RUSSELL RULES

Sports have a certain effect on people everywhere in the world. This effect can include excitement and enjoyment when our team wins, and frustration and disappointment if the outcome is not what we hoped for.

Bill Russell became a sports icon with reason. He is an original, with more championships than any other team player as evidenced by his recognition in being named the 20th century’s greatest team player by Sports Illustrated and HBO called him the greatest winner in the 20th century. He was the 1st African American to coach a professional sports team and won two championships as a player/coach without even an assistant coach. He won championships in the NCAA, the Olympics and an NBA championship  all in the same year (1956).

The book, RUSSELL RULES is a collection of basketball and personal examples from Russell’s career. The balance between sports, business and personal integrity is clear, easy to follow and is genuinely interesting, whether one likes sports or not.

The 11 lessons address commitment, team decision processes, accountability, change, discipline, the need for the desire to win and a number of how-to business examples. These lessons include easy to follow messages on ego management, active listening, setting standards and meeting them, seeking and encouraging perfection, building mutual trust, positive control, using imagination to to enhance performance, leadership by establishing and reinforcing discipline, as well as earned delegation and finally, always looking for the win, whatever the odds.

Russell has not been an active part of the Celtics in recent years, but in a 2008 televised interview with the current center, Kevin Garnett, one could hear that his public words of counsel and planning reflected what must have been said in private between the two men of different generations. Russell expressed that he felt the current Celtic team could win two or three championships if they played as a team. Those exchanges were meaningful to me as part of team, leadership and accountability in every day examples of life.

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On a related note (after this book was written), in February of 2011, US President Barack Obama awarded Bill Russell with the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the United States’ highest civilian award. This recognition is given to men and women who have “made an especially meritorious contribution to (1), the security or national interests of the United States, or (2) world peace, or (3) cultural or other significant public or private endeavors.” The White House issued the following statement regarding Russell’s honor.

Bill Russell is the former Boston Celtics’ Captain who almost single-handedly redefined the game of basketball. Russell led the Celtics to a virtually unparalleled string of eleven championships in thirteen years and was named the NBA’s Most Valuable Player five times. The first African American to coach in the NBA–indeed he was the first to coach a major sport at the professional level in the United States–Bill Russell is also an impassioned advocate of human rights. He marched with Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., and has been a consistent advocate of equality.

The book epilogue has an outstanding message ” making CELTIC PRIDE work for you. I urge you to read this resource and enjoy!

As always, feedback or comments are welcome
John Hogan CHA CHE CMHS CHO
HoganHospitality
HospitalityEducators com