How to Use Hospitality Consultants Effectively

My greatest strength as a consultant is to be ignorant and ask a few questions”
Peter F. Drucker, (1909- 2005) American Educator and Author

While Peter Drucker was not specifically a hospitality consultant, his contributions to both the “people and the process “components of business consulting are enormous and lasting, as evidenced by his significant works and books.

In a  column  I wrote several years ago, I shared a number of observations I made while I was conducting a multi-city series of programs on optimizing meetings success for Meetings Quest , when it was owned and managed by co-founder Barbara Cox-Dunn. http://www.meetingsquest.com/ . Today it is owned and managed by  Schneider Publishing

The observations I shared were about the stimulating and interactive discussions held on ways to optimize meeting success from various perspectives of professional meeting planners and hotels. Almost 50% of the time for the program was committed to small group discussions on problems facing all of these professionals in the same industry, but that have slightly different roles and responsibilities. Attendees comprise professional meeting planners from corporations and associations of every size, hotel managers and sales teams, representatives from convention and visitors’ bureaus, suppliers that serve all of the previous groups and independent professionals in the hospitality business.

I wrote the column, titled “5 Reasons Using A Qualified Consultant Could Make a Huge Difference in Your Hospitality Business” because there was such extensive cross-fertilizing of ideas and solutions among participants in the discussions mentioned above.

I also received a number of emails on the column, including this one: “ Having been both an exec using advice from consultants and now a consultant myself, I can only fully subscribe John Hogan’s comments and five reasons for a (good and qualified) consultant. I would like to add a sixth reason: The consultant is not emotionally involved and can thus provide very objective reasoning for a specific business situation.  John F. Edmaier CMM.”

Comments from other readers and attendees at the above-mentioned sessions generally complimented the potential value of consultants, but there was also caution sheared that consultants could also be a source of negativity if not used properly and effectively, as evidenced in this tongue in cheek “motivational message” from http://www.despair.com.

Consulting
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This message paints the negative image of consulting, as that of people who “hang around until” it may be too late. When a project nears completion, new troubles seem to inexplicably appear. Those challenges could be in staffing, communication, technology, equipment or distribution of global reservations. Each challenge extends the consultant’s assignment and before you know it, the financial and time costs for the consultant’s services affect your income statement in an unexpected way.

To avoid this danger, I offer the following : Five Considerations in Hiring a Hospitality Consultant.

I don’t believe in just ordering people to do things. You have to sort of grab an oar and row with them.”   Harold S. Geneen, American Executive and CEO (1959-1977) of ITT, then parent company of Sheraton Hotels

I was a management trainee at the 1500 room Sheraton Boston Hotel near the end of Geneen’s affiliation with Sheraton. He was known as a taskmaster, but he also had the reputation for involvement with identifying problems and solutions.

1. Involve key staff. Staff buy in is critical when deciding to engage the services of a consultant The danger of failure grows enormously unless key associates are involved in the decision making process of hiring a consultant. I have seen organizations that did not take this proactive approach, and the resentment or negativity can torpedo the project before it really begins.

2. Set specific and clear expectations. Responding to RFPs and making effective presentations is one thing, but those proposals may not include measurable outcomes or results. Expectations should have clear and defined deliverables, including time and expense details.

3. Establish Accountability for each phase of a consultant’s time and interaction. Consultants may research, discuss and seek to get buy-in on solutions, but they cannot execute the final plan for an organization. It is therefore essential to identify those steps and actions the consultant is responsible and accountable for.

4. Define levels of authority. A consultant according to Drucker’s quote is one who asks questions and then shares counsel. Hospitality businesses, hotels and restaurants can receive exceptional counsel from consultants, but one should not allow them to run your hospitality business unless that was part of the expectations and accountability mentioned above. They probably do not know your hospitality business as well as or better than you do. They may have recommendations that can help you and your team, but senior management and/or ownership should stay involved in the process if you retain a consultant.

5. Match your needs with the specific consultant for your assignment. By this, I mean to be certain you retain the correct individual, as well as company (if applicable). Someone with exceptional credentials as a chef may not be able to design your dining room layout. Success as a sales manager in select markets may not translate into global marketing planning. Running accounting department receivables does not mean the same thing as effectively managing cash flow in tough economic times. If applicable, you might ask questions such as:

  •  What were the largest revenues they personally oversaw?
  •  how many people were on their staff?
  •  What was the turnover rate?
  •  Were they ever entrepreneurs who had to meet their own payroll?
  •  Did they ever have to pay their own business and property taxes, or did they rely on others?
  •  Other questions unique to your situation

There are advantages to both specialists and generalists in consultants, attorneys, doctors and other professionals. We are probably familiar with the expression to “walk the talk”. For purposes of this discussion, this means having personally handled similar challenges facing your hospitality business. My personal experience in retaining or serving as a consultant is to understand and match situations on a case by case situation.

Most consultants have some hospitality industry background but may have never owned their own business. They may have never owned or sold their own hospitality business prior to becoming consultants and do not understand the stress and pressures of operating a family owned business, as are so many hospitality businesses.

Consultants can be excellent resources. Use them effectively, by choosing wisely.

Keys to Success Hospitality Tip of the Week: Focus on Continuous Learning
Hotel Common Sense Philosophy #11 “DARE TO FAIL!”
John J. Hogan, CHA CHE CMHS CHO

part of the 15 Timeless Philosophies In Hospitality, A Keynote Address and Workshop

KEYS TO SUCCESS is the umbrella title for my current programs, hospitality services and columns. This year’s writings will focus on a wide variety of topics for hotel owners, managers and professionals including both my “HOW TO” articles and HOSPITALITY CONVERSATIONS. My segments Lessons from the Field, Hotel Common Sense and Principles for Success will be featured at appropriate times in the year as well.

Success does not come by accident or chance.

Contact us for assistance.

Hospitality.jpg

Kathleen Hogan Ireland Sept 2013John J. Hogan CHA CHE CHO and Kathleen Hogan  MBA CHO are the  co-founders of  HospitalityEducators.com, which was created in 2010 to be a resource for hotel owners and professionals as they sought to improve market share, occupancy, operational efficiency and profitability.

The husband and wife team are transitioning the original membership site concept and evolving the business model today to a focused resource offering consulting, training, and individualized support to both hospitality and other service businesses.   Services include keynote addresses workshops, online support, metrics measurement, marketing and customer service from a group of more than a dozen experienced professionals.   While continuing to serve hospitality, the demand for these types of services is growing and can be personalized.

John Hogan is also the principal of HoganHospitality.com, which provides a range of expert professional services for hotel owners, including professional development for organizations, training, consulting and expert witness services.

John Hogan Sept 2013DSCN0215

Contact information:  Kathleen Hogan  480-436-0283,

John Hogan

602-799-5375 or service@hospitalityeducators.com

Workshops Available include: 

From the Chalkboard to the Front Line

What They Don’t Teach You at Hotel School

Focus:

  • Hotel Profitability
  • Hotel Sales
  • Marketing Ideas
  • Hotel Operations

There will always be an ongoing debate on the comparative merits of experience versus the knowledge acquired in formal educational settings.   The best lessons anyone can learn from hotel schools include an awareness of what really occurs on the front line in the actual hospitality setting.  This keynote transitions the academic message to the real world of running a profitable hospitality business.

 Click    here   for Keynotes and Workshops Available 

http://www.HoganHospitality.com
Your Hospitality Resource for Hotel Owners, Innkeepers, Managers and Associations

Pete Drucker Books

Prepared by the Office of Marketing & Communications at Claremont Graduate University 165 E. Tenth St., Claremont, Calif. 91711 909-621-8028

 The End of Economic Man – 1939
 The Future of Industrial Man – 1942
 Concept of the Corporation – 1946
 The New Society – 1950
 The Practice of Management – 1954
 America’s Next Twenty Years – 1957
 Landmarks of Tomorrow – 1957
 Managing for Results – 1964
 The Effective Executive – 1966
 The Age of Discontinuity – 1968
 Technology, Management and Society – 1970
 Men, Ideas and Politics – 1971Management: Tasks, Responsibilities, Practices – 1973
 The Unseen Revolution – 1976 (reissued in 1996 as The Pension Fund Revolution)
 People and Performance: The Best of Peter Drucker on Management – 1977
 An Introductory View of Management – 1977
 Adventures of a Bystander – 1978 (autobiography)
 Song of the Brush: Japanese Painting from the Sanso Collection – 1979
 Managing in Turbulent Times – 1980
 Toward the Next Economics and Other Essays – 1981
 The Changing World of the Executive – 1982
 The Last of All Possible Worlds – 1982 (novel)
 The Temptation to Do Good – 1984 (novel)
 Innovation and Entrepreneurship – 1985
 Frontiers of Management – 1986
 The New Realities: in Government and Politics, in Economics and Business, in Society and World View – 1989
 Managing the Nonprofit Organization: Principles and Practices – 1990
 Managing for the Future – 1992
 The Ecological Vision – 1993Post-Capitalist Society – 1993
Managing in a Time of Great Change – 1995
 Drucker on Asia: A Dialogue between Peter Drucker and Isao Nakauchi –1997
 Peter Drucker on the Profession of Management – 1998
 Management Challenges for the 21st Century – 1999
 The Essential Drucker – 2001
 Managing in the Next Society – 2002
 A Functioning Society – 2002
 The Daily Drucker – 2004
 The Effective Executive In Action – 2006

WHAT’S THE PROBLEM™ with hospitality training today? A question from HospitalityEducators.com

WHAT’S THE PROBLEM™ with hospitality training today? A question from HospitalityEducators.com

A survey from the American Society of Training and Development several years ago found four top attributes or qualifications employers stated they wanted their associates to have:

  1. the ability to learn
  2. the ability to listen and effectively communicate information
  3. innovative problem-solving skills
  4. the knowledge on how to get things done

While this was a survey subject to changes in values and perspectives, these four qualities certainly have substance in today’ s hospitality world remain intact.

How do you as a manager match up to the list? What about the associates who report to you?

  1. Does your hotel, restaurant, club, spa or store provide the incentive for learning?
  2. Does your hospitality business develop active listening skills? How do you measure effective communication to guests? Among staff?
  3. How do approach problems? While it is tactful to call problems “challenges”, resolving situations to the delight of guests is a real issue.
  4. As in innovative problem-solving, knowing “how” to address situations is essential. Does you staff know how to handle overbooked nights? Or unacceptable entrees? Or noise complaints? Or issues about pricing? The list can be long.

We can help.

WHAT’S THE PROBLEM™? @ www.HospitalityEducators.com  addresses specific hospitality problems.  It  features specific problems submitted by members and readers or identified from HospitalityEducators.com associates’ consulting.  The problem will be stated in industry terms and there will be at least one potential solution discussed. WHAT’S THE PROBLEM™?  Is open to visitors and members.

The key to success here is training, associate engagement and management that cares enough to take the additional step to listen and learn on their own.

Dr. John Hogan interacting with program attendees

John J Hogan CHA CMHS CHE CHE working with clients @ Fairmont Copley Plaza, Boston MA 

Feel free to share an idea for a column at john@hoganhospitality.com anytime or contact me regarding consulting, customized workshops, speaking engagements … And remember – we all need a regular dose of common sense.

John Hogan is a successful hospitality executive, educator, author and consultant and is a frequent keynote speaker and seminar leader at many hospitality industry events.  He is Co-Founder of a consortium (www.HospitalityEducators.com) of successful corporate and academic professionals delivering focused and affordable counsel in solving specific challenges facing hospitality today. www.HospitalityEducators.com offers a wide range of information, forms, best practices and ideas designed to help individual hoteliers and hospitality businesses improve their market penetration, deliver service excellence and increase their profitability. Individuals wishing to contribute materials may send them Kathleen@HospitalityEducators.com

Dr. John Hogan, CHE CHA CMHS CHO         United States – Phoenix,

Phone: 602-799-5375
www.hoganhospitality.com/

Heaven, by Hotel Standards | Observations from a New England Hotelier

People are drawn to hotels.  There’s something about the center of activity in a busy, full service hotel that attracts people from all walks of life globally..

The Parker House hotel in Boston Massachusetts has been open continuously since 1855, and is arguably the oldest continually operating hotel in the United States.

Mark Twain stayed here for a month  in 1877 and he is but one of literally hundreds of celebrities to have made this hotel very well known and appreciated.

Heaven, by Hotel Standards is a book about the history of the Omni Parker House, with information compiled by Susan Wilson.  On page eight of this book,  there’s a wonderful welcome letter from the current general manager, John Murtha, CHA. I had the privilege of meeting John, who is a gracious hotelier.   His letter is sincere and genuine, and  the information about the service of the general managers from 1927 until today helps to demonstrate a longevity and quality of what you seldom find in most brands or hotels today.

In addition to Mark Twain, this book identifies a Who’s Who of celebrities who have been patrons of this hotel   From the age of literature there are writers like Emerson, Thoreau, Hawthorn and Longfellow.  From baseball, there are some well known names ranging from Babe Ruth to Ted Williams to Carl Yastrzemski to David Ortiz.  The hotel has been a center of  of activity in politics with people ranging from Ulysses S Grant, Mayor James Michael Curley, Franklin Delano Roosevelt, John F. Kennedy, Colin Powell, Bill Clinton and most recently, and former Governor Deval Patrick as guests.  Boston has a strong theatrical presence in the theater district and hosted a wide range of prominent actors including John Wilkes Booth (of Lincoln assassination infamy)  Sarah Bernhardt, as well as more contemporary entertainers as Joan Crawford, Judy Garland, James Dean, Stevie Nicks, Yo Yo Ma , Rachel Raye and Ben Affleck.

The hotel itself was built by Harvey Parker, who relocated from his family farm in Maine.  The Parker family arrived in America in the 1630s and Harvey did not want to remain in agriculture.  After number of years in Paris, he arrived in Boston and began his first venture into the hospitality business with a restaurant.  The book does a balanced review, explaining the evolution of the family from the restaurant business and to finding a location for and building what became the Parker house.

The Parker House has had a long time reputation for food and hospitality.  It is credited with creating or perfecting Boston Cream pie, lemon meringue pie, Boston Scrod and of course, the Parker House Rolls.  The book shares an anecdote about Eleanor Roosevelt looking and her request for the recipe, which had been a well kept secret until that request in 1933.

Celebrity chefs at this hotel have included television personalities Emeril Lagasse, Bobby Flay and Martha  Stewart who all wanted to link their reputation with that of the well-known Parker House.  There are stories in the book of organic farming from local farms, orchards and dairies 100 years before organic cooking became popular in the rest of the world.

The Saturday Club was a literary discussion group and included Henry David Thoreau, Henry Longfellow, John Greenleaf Whittier, diplomat Charles Francis Adams, Dr. Oliver Wendell Holmes and many others, who enjoyed the culinary service and hospitality of the Parker house once a month for a number of years.  Charles Dickens resided in the Parker house during his 1867-68 lecture tour.

The Parker house is located  across the street from the old Boston City Hall and  is two blocks from the state capitol.  Every US president from Grant to Clinton stayed at this hotel at some point during their presidency.  The book and movie the Last Hurrah was based on the experiences and activities of longtime mayor James Michael Curley.  The Kennedy family were regular visitors to the hotel and former Speaker of the House, Tip O’Neal is pictured in the book’s preface.

There are interesting interviews with longtime staff and stories about the wonderful jazz greats who performed at this hotel over the years. Some of the staff during the  mid 20th century  included Malcolm X and Ho Chi Min, who worked in the kitchens.

The book also discusses the business aspects of the hotel.  In the chapter called Architecturally Speaking, there are detailed explanations of the transitions and how the hotel evolved and maintained its presence.  There were major changes in operations and styles, with a series of owners over a 50 year period.  Downtown Boston today is very successful for hotels, but hotels were not considered to have a good location downtown in the late 1950s through mid seventies and the Parker House suffered. It did recover with the New England Dunfey family acquisition and management, The Parker House today is an example of exceptional hotel keeping with the Omni name and ownership.

Many grand old hotels today have reputations of ghosts, and the Parker House is no exception.  There are amusing stories of possible sightings from hotel founder Harvey Parker to Charles Dickens. We will have to decide for ourselves if this is fact or fiction.

Pages 105 to 107 lists of dozens of well-known names who enjoyed the hospitality of the Parker House from Mohammed Ali to the Who.

——————————————————————————————————————–

I began my career as a New England hotelier, working in Vermont and Massachusetts, including at the 1500 room Sheraton Boston.   I worked for the Dunfey Hotels when they owned the Parker House and was interviewed for the #2 manager position.   A crisis at the Dunfey Hotel I was managing in Atlanta prevented that transfer, but I do recall the elegance and history of this fine hotel.  I would have enjoyed being part of the history of this fine hotel.

The title of the book is Heaven, By Hotel Standards, and it is certainly an interesting snapshot of successful and innovative Boston hotel keeping over three centuries

Strongly recommended.

John J Hogan CHA CMHS CHE CHO

HospitalityEducators
Hogan Hospitality

Success does not come by accident or chance.

Contact us for assistance.

Hospitality.jpg

Kathleen Hogan Ireland Sept 2013John J. Hogan CHA CHE CHO and Kathleen Hogan  MBA CHO are the  co-founders of  HospitalityEducators.com, which was created in 2010 to be a resource for hotel owners and professionals as they sought to improve market share, occupancy, operational efficiency and profitability.

The husband and wife team are transitioning the original membership site concept and evolving the business model today to a focused resource offering consulting, training, and individualized support to both hospitality and other service businesses.   Services include keynote addresses workshops, online support, metrics measurement, marketing and customer service from a group of more than a dozen experienced professionals.   While continuing to serve hospitality, the demand for these types of services is growing and can be personalized.

John Hogan is also the principal of HoganHospitality.com, which provides a range of expert professional services for hotel owners, including professional development for organizations, training, consulting and expert witness services.

John Hogan Sept 2013DSCN0215

Contact information:  Kathleen Hogan  480-436-0283,

John Hogan

602-799-5375 or service@hospitalityeducators.com

Workshops Available include: 

From the Chalkboard to the Front Line

What They Don’t Teach You at Hotel School

Focus:

  • Hotel Profitability
  • Hotel Sales
  • Marketing Ideas
  • Hotel Operations

There will always be an ongoing debate on the comparative merits of experience versus the knowledge acquired in formal educational settings.   The best lessons anyone can learn from hotel schools include an awareness of what really occurs on the front line in the actual hospitality setting.  This keynote transitions the academic message to the real world of running a profitable hospitality business.

 Click    here   for Keynotes and Workshops Available 

What does it mean to “do right” ? Ask Mark Twain


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What does it mean to “do right” ?

Mark Twain was the Will Rogers or Jon Stewart of his time.  He was both witty and sarcastic in much of his writing, yet he almost always made one smile.

This framed quote by Twain was one of two personal items kept on the desk of Harry S. Truman, the 33rd US President.  Truman, we recall, had never sought the office and he was pressured into accepting the Vice President spot in 1944.   Unlike today when literally dozens of candidates work for years to even gain a nomination, Truman became an unintentional President.

If you were to read David McCullough’s Pulitzer winning book called simply TRUMAN, you would see that this individual had to deal with literally dozens of issues of the times. Segregation, McCarthyism, the Iron Curtain, the war in Korea, the recognition of Israel, the approval of the United Nations and much more were just some of the controversies he faced. Congress was just as disruptive or partisan as today, or perhaps even more so.

Truman’s approval rating when he left office was near the lowest recorded, yet 50 years later, he is now acknowledged as one of the greatest Presidents. (see footnotes)

What does it mean to “do right” to you? 

In business or politics, there is usually an instinct that is founded on values.  Many of us tend to mistrust politicians, as too many of them have proven to be self serving.

Do the business practices of some airlines seem as ethical as others?    Why have so many of them been forced into bankruptcy when others prosper?

Do the business practices of some retailers, hotel companies, phone or cable companies meet the Twain quote?   You must decide on them, as well as for our own businesses.

Truman may or may not have been appreciated in his career, but his legacy remains intact and actually stronger.

How do we want to be remembered? What are we doing about it to make that happen?

 

John J Hogan CHA CMHS CHE CHO

HospitalityEducators.com
Hogan Hospitality  

Success does not come by accident or chance.

Contact us for assistance.


John J. Hogan CHA CHE CHO and Kathleen Hogan  MBA CHO are the  co-founders of  HospitalityEducators.com, which was created in 2010 to be a resource for hotel owners and professionals as they sought to improve market share, occupancy, operational efficiency and profitability.

The husband and wife team are transitioning the original membership site concept and evolving the business model today to a focused resource offering consulting, training, and individualized support to both hospitality and other service businesses.   Services include keynote addresses workshops, online support, metrics measurement, marketing and customer service from a group of more than a dozen experienced professionals.   While continuing to serve hospitality, the demand for these types of services is growing and can be personalized.

John Hogan is also the principal of HoganHospitality.com, which provides a range of expert professional services for hotel owners, including professional development for organizations, training, consulting and expert witness services.

Contact information:  Kathleen Hogan  480-436-0283,

John Hogan 602-799-5375 or service@hospitalityeducators.com

Workshops Available include: 

From the Chalkboard to the Front Line

What They Don’t Teach You at Hotel School

Focus:

  • Hotel Profitability
  • Hotel Sales
  • Marketing Ideas
  • Hotel Operations

There will always be an ongoing debate on the comparative merits of experience versus the knowledge acquired in formal educational settings.   The best lessons anyone can learn from hotel schools include an awareness of what really occurs on the front line in the actual hospitality setting.  This keynote transitions the academic message to the real world of running a profitable hospitality business.

 Click    here   for Keynotes and Workshops Available 

 

footnotes

Fathers and Coaches can have a great deal in common| A FATHERS DAY MESSAGE

Things do not always turn out the way we hope…..

When my children were young, I was an involved Dad who coached his children in baseball and softball for more than 15 seasons.  I personally have little athletic prowess, so it was not for me to relive glory days.  It was also not to give my kids a heads up on position, batting order or anything like that.

It was a way for this Dad to connect with his kids, to build some lifetime memories and as it turned out, it was a way for me share some of my coaching skills with both my kids and their team-mates.

Those memories are mixed – each of my children had a championship season, each had at least one year in last place and most of the time we were in the  middle.   Sounds like life, doesn’t it?

It also showed me the need to try the less talented players in different positions. Some they succeeded at, and many did not.

A memory I have, though, is almost every youngster who could returned to our team every year they were eligible.   Some helped the team, others did not, but it was their team and the collective memories are worth the efforts for all of us.

Back to the intro –   Things do not always turn out the way we hope…..

This is a short message about a world class athlete and his experience.

This father – coach was there when his son needed him the most.

I have been in the hospitality industry my entire career and I find coaching is an essential and enjoyable tool to use on the road to success!

John J Hogan CHA CMHS CHE CHO

HospitalityEducators
Hogan Hospitality

Success does not come by accident or chance.

Contact us for assistance.

Hospitality.jpg

Kathleen Hogan Ireland Sept 2013John J. Hogan CHA CHE CHO and Kathleen Hogan  MBA CHO are the  co-founders of  HospitalityEducators.com, which was created in 2010 to be a resource for hotel owners and professionals as they sought to improve market share, occupancy, operational efficiency and profitability.

The husband and wife team are transitioning the original membership site concept and evolving the business model today to a focused resource offering consulting, training, and individualized support to both hospitality and other service businesses.   Services include keynote addresses workshops, online support, metrics measurement, marketing and customer service from a group of more than a dozen experienced professionals.   While continuing to serve hospitality, the demand for these types of services is growing and can be personalized.

John Hogan is also the principal of HoganHospitality.com, which provides a range of expert professional services for hotel owners, including professional development for organizations, training, consulting and expert witness services.

John Hogan Sept 2013DSCN0215

 

 

Contact information:  Kathleen Hogan  480-436-0283,

John Hogan

602-799-5375 or service@hospitalityeducators.com

Workshops Available include: 

From the Chalkboard to the Front Line

What They Don’t Teach You at Hotel School

Focus:

  • Hotel Profitability
  • Hotel Sales
  • Marketing Ideas
  • Hotel Operations

There will always be an ongoing debate on the comparative merits of experience versus the knowledge acquired in formal educational settings.   The best lessons anyone can learn from hotel schools include an awareness of what really occurs on the front line in the actual hospitality setting.  This keynote transitions the academic message to the real world of running a profitable hospitality business.

Click    here   for Keynotes and Workshops Available 

Recommended Reading from A Founding Associate of HospitalityEducators.com : A Father’s Word to His Children

         

In these days of information overload, it is a pleasure to find a book that seeks to share calm, insights and a moment for reflection.

For those looking for a gift of inspiration in both words and photographs of nature ‘s flowers, “A Father’s Word to His Children”  should be near the top for serious consideration.  Filled with short, thought provoking insights and beautiful photography, this book can be for personal meditation or a thoughtful gift for any occasion  (birthdays, anniversaries, graduations, weddings or just because).

In this book, Kentucky author Dr. Marc Clark guides fathers on how to show their children love in ways they can understand.   He believes that when fathers speak, their words create impressions, pictures, expectations, and dreams. He hopes fathers will make the most of the connections they can build and the positive influence they can have through the pages in this book.

Dr. Clark has been interacting with groups of people in hospitality management, training and education for the past 30+ years, in more than 20 countries.  He has lectured around the world and this book reminds me in some ways of the Father’s Wisdom series by Jackson Brown a number of years ago or others like it.  It would make a great desk top book and should appeal to the heart of all people, cultures and age groups.

Published by Tate Publishing and Enterprises, the book is available through bookstores nationwide, from the publisher or by visiting Barnes & Noble or Amazon com.

This is also an eLIVE title, meaning each book contains a code redeemable for a free audio book version from TatePublishing       eLIVE – Listen, Imagine, View, and Experience!

Dr. Clark lives in Franklin, Kentucky with his wife, Penny. He has six children and ten grandchildren.  He attributes his success to faith, family, and friends.

He begins the book in his personal way of communication – respect for everyone and a higher being.

The content of my book, “A Father’s Word to His Children” comes from my heart.  I hope you enjoy reading and pondering it as much as I did creating it. 

Respectfully   Dr. Marc Clark, PS 63:7

Dr. and Mrs. Marc Clark at a Book Signing.

For signed copies from the author, hard cover or soft cover, go to his site ,www.smartbizzonline.com, click on books & gallery tab and follow the prompts

HospitalityEducators.com Recommended Reading | The Customer Rules: The 39 Essential Rules for Delivering Sensational Service


Customer Rules

 

The author of this book has been responsible in his career for the customer service at one of the world’s best known service delivery companies -DisneyWorld. He was responsible for 40,000 people in hotels, theme parks, shopping, entertainment and sports centers.

Disney’s often been used as a training center for leadership and guest service and Lee Cockerell’s book on delivering sensational service is right on.

There are 39 chapters or rules in this 179 page book and they are all direct, common sense in approach in logical.

The introduction states simply “be nice”. He says this means being friendly, polite, pleasant, considerate and skilled. He cautions that rules and procedures will not work if you do not have the right people doing the right job. This is more common sense, but we have discovered in so many businesses that common sense is relatively unknown.

Examples of rules include:
Number 1 – customer service is not a department
Number 4 – do not get bored with the basics
Number 12- rehearse, rehearse, rehearse
Number 17- listen up
Number 24- do not make promises, make guarantees
Number 38- keep doing it better

The other 33 are just as direct and understandable, yet they need to be understood.

I have been in the hospitality industry my entire career and I find this a logical, easy-to-follow set of guidelines for anyone providing service to others.

Highly recommended!

John J Hogan CHA CMHS CHE CHO
HospitalityEducators
Hogan Hospitality

Success does not come by accident or chance.

Contact us for assistance.

Hospitality.jpg

Kathleen Hogan Ireland Sept 2013John J. Hogan CHA CHE CHO and Kathleen Hogan  MBA CHO are the  co-founders of  HospitalityEducators.com, which was created in 2010 to be a resource for hotel owners and professionals as they sought to improve market share, occupancy, operational efficiency and profitability.

The husband and wife team are transitioning the original membership site concept and evolving the business model today to a focused resource offering consulting, training, and individualized support to both hospitality and other service businesses.   Services include keynote addresses workshops, online support, metrics measurement, marketing and customer service from a group of more than a dozen experienced professionals.   While continuing to serve hospitality, the demand for these types of services is growing and can be personalized.

John Hogan is also the principal of HoganHospitality.com, which provides a range of expert professional services for hotel owners, including professional development for organizations, training, consulting and expert witness services.

John Hogan Sept 2013DSCN0215

 

 

Contact information:  Kathleen Hogan  480-436-0283,

John Hogan

602-799-5375 or service@hospitalityeducators.com

Workshops Available include: 

From the Chalkboard to the Front Line

What They Don’t Teach You at Hotel School

Focus:

  • Hotel Profitability
  • Hotel Sales
  • Marketing Ideas
  • Hotel Operations

There will always be an ongoing debate on the comparative merits of experience versus the knowledge acquired in formal educational settings.   The best lessons anyone can learn from hotel schools include an awareness of what really occurs on the front line in the actual hospitality setting.  This keynote transitions the academic message to the real world of running a profitable hospitality business.

Click    here   for Keynotes and Workshops Available 

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