A really great book on life for anyone – BUT ESPECIALLY FOR THOSE UNDER 50

HOW WILL YOU MEASURE YOUR LIFE

 

200 page book. 3 sections. 10 chapters.

 

Doesn’t sound that different from many others we may have read over the years, does it?

 

Yet, this one is.

 

 

 

This was on one of those lists from a podcast company saying it was one of the most important books ever written and they consolidated it into an 18 minute audio recap.  While I listen to CDs on various topics regularly, I still try to read two books a week to keep my mind active and open to new ideas.

This is not a typical “self-help” book. Many of them have some good points, but just as many focus on a single message, often leading to other products to buy.  Nothing wrong with that.

I have a great deal of respect for many University and college professors and was proud to be affiliated with the Council of Hotel, Restaurant and Institutional Educators (CHRIE) for 6 years with a professional membership. I taught at three different universities and colleges as an adjunct professor over a 20 year period.  An issue I have with a good number of institutions is the requirement for research and studies that do not have much practical application for most of us.

This book and these authors do not take that approach.

The primary author, Clayton Christensen begins with life observations that many of his classmates, despite many achievements, were clearly disappointed with their lives. What faces many of us – failed marriages, issues with family and the weakening of many personal relationships are briefly and well stated as indicators of serious issues that negatively affected lives.

For background, Christensen is not a typical professor.  He has been involved in many different business and industries.  He is an author of substance and practical application.   He recognized issues about success and failure and talks about them

He challenges his graduating students with 3 unassuming questions to examine, measure, and improve their lives after college:

(Note- these are my capsules, not his actual questions)

  1. How do I need to do be to have a successful and happy career?
  2. How do I maintain and strengthen my relationships with my spouse, my children and cherished friends for the benefit of all?
  3. How can I be an ethical person in these changing times of growing duplicity and deceit?

The authors examine how to think about life, what causes what to happen, and why.  There are business case studies throughout the book that demonstrate their points

The authors discuss:

  • priorities – many questions we have asked or should ask ourselves today to find success and happiness in  careers, in  relationships and how to listen to the right inner voice we all hear
  • Motivation and how to assess what is really important to us
  • Money as neither good or bad, but a potential problem when it displaces everything else
  • Assessing job choices and a list of great questions for all of us
  • How-to’s on building and maintaining strong personal relationships
  • Building internal and healthy cultures- business, personal and family
  • Defining our own personal purpose in life

I am a boomer and above that age I mentioned in the title, but I found this book thought provoking and interesting for self-assessment.  I recognized life stages I did very well, and others I wish I had do overs. I saw some stages where I corrected my course and as impotently how I was able to assist others as a mentor, a guide or simply a life friend.

I really enjoyed reading this very different point of view on do-it-yourself analysis.
“How Will You Measure Your Life?”

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John J Hogan, CHA CMHS CHE CHO

John@Hoganhospitality.com    Office 480-436-0283   Cell 602-799-5375

Hotelier, Speaker, Educator, Author, Expert Witness

 

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A 19th century quote that influenced a 20th Century President

I posted a version of this in 2010 – it is interesting to assess what directions society continues to turn to almost a decade later.

Are we following this message?

Image result for truman framed quote "always do right"

This framed quote was one of two personal items kept on the desk of Harry S. Truman

 

 

John J Hogan, CHA CMHS CHE CHO

John@Hoganhospitality.com    Office 480-436-0283   Cell 602-799-5375

Hotelier, Speaker, Educator, Author, Expert Witness

For your reading consideration: Thoughtful and a Bit of Business History

For your reading consideration: Thoughtful and a Bit of Business History –             MAKING THE WORLD BETTER -the ideas that shaped a company & a century

I was surprised to see so many IBM retired and former employees reviewing and quoted in this book, but on reflection that makes sense. IBM for the past 100 years now has played a major role in the evolution of both US and global business history.

The book at times is a bit too anecdotal for the person who may not be a techie or who may not care about the details of some of the IBM story but overall it hits the mark.

In the three major sections, they cover:

1. The science – this is the pioneering segment of how to move from the incredible basics to the foundations of meaningful technology for the every day person.

2. Thomas Watson Sr had adopted the slogan “THINK” in 1911 and section 2 addresses the evolution of creating economic value from knowledge. IBM did not do everything “right” but they did help to create the concept of the modern corporation.

3.Making the World Better completes the circle and shares global stories of balancing business, values, ethics and profitability while dealing with governments and greed.

Regardless of how one feels about certain kinds of computers or high tech, this is worth the read.

As always, feedback is appreciated.

John J Hogan, CHA CMHS CHE CHO

John@Hoganhospitality.com    Office 480-436-0283   Cell 602-799-5375

Hotelier, Speaker, Educator, Author, Expert Witness

What is your assessment of the Gillette message: The Best Men Can be?

Watch this 90 second video & share your insights why there are 40% more negative than positive responses to this message about “The Best Men Can Be”?

 

🙏🏼 PLEASE HIT THE LIKE BUTTON IF YOU FOUND THIS ARTICLE HELPFUL

 

As always, feedback is appreciated.

John J Hogan, CHA CMHS CHE CHO

John@Hoganhospitality.com    Office 480-436-0283   Cell 602-799-5375

Hotelier, Speaker, Educator, Author, Expert Witness

Christmas Gift Suggestions

TWO SLIGHTLY DIFFERENT LISTS WITH THE SAME INTENTIONS

John J Hogan, CHA CMHS CHE CHO

John@Hoganhospitality.com    Office 480-436-0283   Cell 602-799-5375

Hotelier, Speaker, Educator, Author, Expert Witness

 

Guest Blog message from Stanley Turkel- The Pineapple as a Symbol of Hospitality, Fanciful Travel Predictions & Definition of “Turnpike”,

Hotel History: Fanciful Prediction – In the September 1912 issue of American Homes & Gardens, futurist Harold D. Eberlein presented his predictions of the impact of air travel on American cities.  Eberlein foresaw a proliferation of roof gardens on top of large hotels to provide pleasing views for guests.  He also predicted that travelers could expect to find “clerks and bellboys posted on the top floor ready to attend to the immediate wants of tourists who have just arrived by airplane. Aerial taxicabs will circle like vultures over the hotel waiting for a doorman to signal one of them to alight and pick up a departing guest.” The creation of drones and self-driven vehicles shows just how close we are to fulfilling Eberlein’s fanciful prediction of the future. Google’s efforts to build delivery drones and internet-beaming balloons are no longer just science projects.

Definition of “Turnpike” – It came from the practice of placing a pike or staff across a toll road. One side of the pike was imbedded with spikes. When the toll was paid, the pike was turned spikes down so the traveler could pass. The first turnpike was built between Philadelphia and Lancaster in 1792.

The Pineapple as a Symbol of Hospitality – In order to understand how the pineapple became the symbol for hospitality, we must return to Newport, Rhode Island in the 17th century. It was founded in 1639 by settlers seeking religious freedom. Newport’s majestic schooners participated in the infamous Triangle trade:  ships would sail to western Africa to pick up slaves, continue to the Caribbean to trade the slaves for sugar, molasses and sugar and then back to New England. Along with these commodities, captains would bring home pineapples whose exotic shape and sweetness made them a rare delicacy in the colonies.  Before emails or cellphones, sea captains would place the pineapples on their gate posts or over their doorways to inform neighbors that they had returned.  Colonial hostesses would set a fresh pineapple as a centerpiece of their dining table when visitors joined their families in their homes.  Later, carved wooden pineapples were placed over the doorways of inns and hotels to represent hospitality.  The practice has continued to the present and frequently one sees the pineapple icon in hotels, restaurants and homes to signal an atmosphere of hospitality and welcome.

Hokusai, the great Japanese master printmaster, once wrote:

“From the age of six, I had a passion for copying the form of things and since the age of fifty I have published many drawings. Yet of all I drew by my seventieth year there is nothing worth taking into account. At seventy-three years I partly understood the structure of animals, birds, insects and fishes, and the life of grasses and plants. And so, at eighty-six I shall progress further; at ninety I shall even further penetrate their secret meaning, and by one hundred I shall perhaps truly have reached the level of the marvelous and divine. When I am one hundred and ten, each dot, each line will possess a life of its own.”

My Published Books

All of these books can be ordered from AuthorHouse by visiting www.stanleyturkel.com and clicking on the book’s title.

About Stanley Turkel 

Stanley Turkel was designated as the 2014 and the 2015` Historian of the Year by Historic Hotels of America, the official program of the National Trust for Historic Preservation. This award is presented to an individual for making a unique contribution in the research and presentation of hotel history and whose work has encouraged a wide discussion and a greater understanding and enthusiasm for American History.

Turkel is a well-known consultant in the hotel industry. He operates his hotel consulting practice serving as an expert witness in hotel-related cases, provides asset management and hotel franchising consultation. He is certified as a Master Hotel Supplier Emeritus by the Educational Institute of the American Hotel and Lodging Association.

All of his books can be ordered from the publisher (AuthorHouse) by visiting www.stanleyturkel.com and clicking on the book title.

Contact: Stanley stanturkel@aol.com / 917-628-8549

Please Take Note   Effective June 5, 2018, my new address is:

Stanley Turkel, CMHS,   5000 Fairbanks Avenue #321,      Alexandria, Virginia 22311

______________________________________________________________

John J Hogan, CHA CMHS CHE CHO

John@Hoganhospitality.com    Office 480-436-0283   Cell 602-799-5375

Hotelier, Speaker, Educator, Author, Expert Witness

A very good introduction for those looking to find the value of “mindfulness.”​

 Get Some Headspace: How Mindfulness Can Change Your Life in Ten Minutes a Day

My son lived in Korea for five years and had communicated a number of Eastern beliefs and practices from his time there and I therefore had a fundamental awareness of the topic of mindfulness through meditation.

The title of this book intrigued me because like many Westerners, I felt a void in certain areas and felt “head space” could be a positive. The author, Andy Puddicombe, is a former Buddhist monk and is recognized as an important mindfulness meditation expert in the UK.

The introduction seems a bit drawn out, but it actually dispels some myths about meditation and introduces the reader to the reasons behind the concepts in the book. It addresses the values and principles of meditation, and the author’s personal experiences.

The book is in sections

1. ‘The Approach’

2. The Practice’

3. ‘The Integration’,

Each of these move the reader from background and general interest to preparing to meditate and then to incorporating the concept of mindfulness into your life.

Along the way are a series of short exercises one can do while reading, which is really a good introduction.

The book is manageable and easy to follow. Personal examples and stories are blended throughout the book and make the topics easier to follow as he is describing them.

He tries to balance the value of meditation between focus and relaxation, which makes the comments on mindfulness more understandable. The focus of “Get Some Headspace” is a greater awareness and understanding of ourselves and those we interact with. It focuses on finding our inner self, choosing how we see life and how we communicate and communicate with others

Puddicombe declares that meditating just ten minutes a day increases productivity, clarity and focus, reduces stress and anxiety, and helps with weight loss, improves sleep and personal relationships. He quotes research on increased blood flow and physical changes in the part of the brain that helps to control emotions and behavior and that mindfulness training can effectively treat certain addictions and eating disorders. There are claims of enhanced performance, in making sleep easier, and in a series of other improvements in cognitive skills and reducing the intensity of negative emotions, anxiety and harmful stress.

In reading books that claim to be life changing, it is always a challenge to write a meaningful and early review until one gets to judge the lasting benefits. The author’s website includes 10 free audio mediation sessions, which are supportive in trying to learn the how and why of the 10 minute habit.

I rate a 4 Star, and feel that “Get Some Headspace” is a very good introduction for beginners those looking to find the value of “mindfulness.”

John J Hogan, CHA CMHS CHE CHO    John@Hoganhospitality.com

Office 480-436-0283   Cell 602-799-5375

Hotelier, Speaker, Educator, Author, Expert Witness

John J. Hogan, CHA CMHS CHE CHO

Speaker, Author, Expert Witness, Hotelier,Educator