How does your hotel provide memorable customer service?

Two weeks ago, I wrote a column that highlighted one of the most memorable service codes ever offered in hospitality – the Statler Hotel Service Code.  I included the original wording (penned in 1916) and gave readers the opportunity to receive a training powerpoint I created that is an updated version of the Statler Service Code, using current terms and approaches.

This offer generated close to 100 requests from around the world, in all six continents and from hospitality businesses ranging from a small airline in Scandinavia to tour guide services in South Africa.  Hotels and management companies representing luxury to mid-range brands and independent hotel owners and managers shared their goals and (at times) frustrations with motivating their staff.

Statler created one of the most successful hospitality ventures and it survived his death in 1928 right through the Great Depression, the 2nd World War and into the early 1950s when Conrad Hilton purchased the chain for the largest real estate investment ever made in the world to that time.  While recapping this bit of business background is not meant to be a history lesson, it does illuminate the strength and longevity of Statler’s values as articulated in his Service Code.

I include the historical perspective given above in reaction to comments received from readers of my follow-up column – THERE SHOULD BE NO SUCH THING AS LIMITED SERVICE.  Several people complimented the message, while one retired hospitality executive offered a slightly different viewpoint.  He opined that some travelers were really not interested in “service,” but were looking only for low prices and the minimum.  I disagree with his opinion because service includes such fundamentals as common courtesy and appreciation at every price point.

To illustrate what I mean, let me relate a lunch experience at a national, mid-priced US restaurant chain just last week with these observations:

  1. The hostess sincerely welcomed us
  2. We were offered several options on where we might prefer to sit
  3. We were given the name of our server and were encouraged to ask anyone on     staff for anything needed
  4. Our server asked a number of questions that were likely scripted (were we familiar with their specials, were we on a time constraint, had we ever tried this or that, etc.) but also again reminded us that they operated in serving teams and that several of them would be working to make our meal enjoyable and memorable
  5. The service was attentive, the food was excellent and the check was promptly delivered and handled

A major point of distinction in this experience was at our departure and this remains a major point in Statler’s Service Code.   As we left the restaurant, at least three people on staff who were not part of our service team went out of their way to offer a sincere “thank you, please come again!” Their appreciation of our business had little to do with what we ordered or how much we spent.

I posted a discussion question on several of my Linkedin groups a few days ago and would like to open the topic to readers of this short column:

How does your hotel provide memorable customer service?

How does your hospitality business team provide exceptional and memorable customer service?

Recent blog postings on memorable service standards have prompted high levels of reader interest.  I am reaching out to top hoteliers for examples of how to deliver exceptional service that builds customer loyalty. We all recognize the need to avoid being viewed as a commodity.

Please limit each submission or idea to a paragraph or less and send them no later than September 5, 2010.  I will share your responses with readers in a future column.  Thank you in advance!

Feedback or ideas for future pieces are welcome.  Contact me at info@HoganHospitality.com

Finally,  to additional readers looking for the updated service code, it will be available at no charge until 9/5 in the FREE RESOURCES section of www.HospitalityEducators.com

Blog of Dr. John Hogan CHE CHA MHS 8.30.2010

www.HospitalityEducators.com www.HoganHospitality.com

John Hogan is a successful hospitality executive, educator, author and consultant and is a frequent keynote speaker and seminar leader at many hospitality industry events.  He is Co-Founder of a consortium (www.HospitalityEducators.com) of successful corporate and academic mentors delivering focused and affordable counsel in solving specific challenges facing the hospitality industry. www.HospitalityEducators.com is a membership site offering a wide range of information, forms, best practices and ideas that are designed to help individual hoteliers and hospitality businesses improve their market penetration, deliver service excellence and increase their profitability.   Special introductory pricing is in effect for a limited time that also includes a complimentary copy of LESSONS FROM THE FIELD- A COMMON SENSE APPROACH TO EFFECTIVE HOTEL SALES.  If readers would like to contribute to the site, please submit your material for consideration to Kathleen@hospitalityeducators.com.  We are interested in expanding our global networks and resources as we support our membership.

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There should be no such thing as “limited service” in hotels or hospitality

In the guides published by the American Automobile Association, there are a number of classifications for lodging types.  By AAA definition, they include general descriptions of differing levels of food/beverage outlets, shops, conference/meeting facilities, ranges of recreation, entertainment options.  The descriptions give an overview of size of the properties and an overview of common characteristics.

In general their range of classifications include:

  • Full Service,  with Resorts and Hotels  in this category.
  • Limited Service include Condominiums, Motor Inns, Apartments, Cottage, Motels and Bed and Breakfasts
  • Moderate Service listings include Ranches, Country Inns and Lodges.
  • Further sub-classifications include: Suite, extended stay, historic and classic properties.

We are certainly not trying to challenge AAA overviews, as their intent is to provide meaningful interpretations of so many kinds of options. Their guides further point out the basis of their various diamond ratings.  AAA has done a commendable job trying to explain the differences to the consumer and they do so substantially in product differentiation.

A major problem comes though, in our opinion , in the phrase  “limited service” versus “full service”.  Full service usually implies those hotels with restaurants, lounges,  meeting rooms and other product amenities.

The phrase “lodge” or “bed and breakfast” implies by name alone certain things to certain travelers, yet obviously these phrases alone do not mean enough. For example, by AAA definitions, bed and breakfast establishments are “usually smaller, owner operated establishment emphasizing an “away-from-home feeling”.  A continental or full, hot breakfast is included.

Many ROOMS ONLY establishments also serve breakfast and many have at least smaller meeting space, ranging from suites to meeting areas,  breakfast rooms, etc.  They have van drivers who act as bellman. They have management team members who are outstanding hosts and hoteliers.

Former AH&LA Small Business Specialist Jerrold Boyer used to become very frustrated with managers who embraced the term “limited service.”  He used to remind hoteliers at educational and advisory seminars that the hospitality industry is indeed the SERVICE industry.  His word of caution was that bigger did not necessarily mean better, nor did smaller automatically mean lesser.

There are many smaller, rooms-only properties that offer exceptional personalized attentiveness to their guests.  It is the responsibility of the managers, owners and sales staff of those facilities to “sell” their staff and guests of the quality and extent of their service.  There are many guests  who might prefer smaller properties and staffs who elect to leave food operations to others.

If this industry is to continue to provide exceptional experiences for its guests and meaningful careers for its’ staff, it must be attentive to its commitment to hospitality and not just “renting rooms.”

“Limited service” – let’s leave that image for the self-serve gas stations.

Check http://www.hospitalityeducators.com for more ideas!

Feedback or ideas for future pieces are welcome -contact me at info@HoganHospitality.com

Blog of Dr. John Hogan CHE CHA MHS 8.14.2010        

 www.HospitalityEducators.com, http://www.HoganHospitality.com

 John Hogan is a successful hospitality executive, educator, author and consultant and is a frequent keynote speaker and seminar leader at many hospitality industry events.  He is Co-Founder of a consortium (www.HospitalityEducators.com) of successful corporate and academic mentors delivering focused and affordable counsel in solving specific challenges facing the hospitality industry. www.HospitalityEducators.com is a membership site offering a wide range of information, forms, best practices and ideas that are designed to help individual hoteliers and hospitality businesses improve their market penetration, deliver service excellence and increase their profitability.   Special introductory pricing is in effect for a limited time that also includes a complimentary copy of LESSONS FROM THE FIELD- A COMMON SENSE APPROACH TO EFFECTIVE HOTEL SALES.

One of the most comprehensive and meaningful service codes ever introduced in hospitality

This  series on the “high-touch” side of hospitality has prompted positive reader feedback and ideas from hoteliers and managers who have participated in some of my workshops idea

·         Segment 1 underscored the need for hospitality businesses to deliver unique experience to avoid being viewed as a commodity.

·         Segment 2 focused on identifying ways to encourage hotel staffs to think about the “guest experience” , whether you are an independent hotel or brand affiliated  It offered concrete examples ways to avoid being seen as ordinary or a “commodity” in the critical guest service of SLEEP

·         Segment 3 examined the essential topic of significant value to hotel guests everywhere: BREAKFAST.

·         Segment 4 generated the most reader feedback, with general agreement that calming “an angry customer” gives hotels the chance to win loyalty be demonstrating sincere concern.

No one is proposing that we want to annoy guests, but  there is agreement that a “satisfied” guest is probably not thinking a hotel is very special and that  an “adequate” stay does not likely build loyalty or repeat visits.  Hotels of today must anticipate problem areas and respond immediately when one arises.  This means that hotel owners and managers must allow and insist that their staffs do whatever it takes to meet the customers’ needs and a  number of individual properties, brands and chains have worked to refine their staff responsiveness to these guest annoyances.

In the last column, I promised I would share one of the most comprehensive and meaningful service codes ever introduced. An unusual and perhaps unexpected fact about this service code is that it premiered almost a century ago by one of the most successful hoteliers of all time.

Elsworth Statler has been described and considered one of the most innovative and creative of hoteliers of all time.  He is credited with many of the practices and construction methods that became industry standards.

It was in Buffalo in 1908 that Elsworth Statler, (born into poverty in a West Virginia mining center during the American Civil War), began paying real attention to details that would become trademarks of his genius.  In a 300-room hotel, he was the first to provide a bathroom in each room, which had been unheard of that time.  Rather than force guests that were strangers to share common baths down the hall, he modified the construction practice to build rooms “back-to-back”.   This practice was then able to use common electrical conduit and plumbing shafts (later known as the Statler plumbing shaft), making the bathroom a basic part of every Statler hotel and within a decade in many of the hotels in the industry.

The Buffalo Statler introduced other innovations that evolved into standards at many hotels, including circulating ice water in every room, which was important in the pre-air conditioning heat in many cities,  telephones in every room, a full size closet in every room, lights in every closet and a hook by the mirror in each bathroom that encouraged guests to reuse their towel, thereby saving laundry costs.

Statler understood success was a combination of operations and marketing.  He was perceptive in paying attention to building revenues and anticipated the expansion of conventions and meetings business.  Guest rooms were not decorated in a “cookie cutter” style, but were with the proper balance of colors and design so that bedspreads, draperies and rugs could be interchanged from room to room if need be.

In addition to the physical amenities he stressed and introduced, he recognized that guests had to feel appreciated.   To emphasize his commitment, Statler introduced what he called the STATLER SERVICE CODE.

Statler Service Code

  • It is the business of a good hotel to cater to the public. It is the avowed business of the Hotel Statler to please the public better than any other hotel in the world.
  • Have everyone feel that for his money we want to give him more sincere service than he ever before received at any hotel.
  • Never be perky, pungent or fresh. The guest pays your salary as well as mine. He is your immediate benefactor.
  • Hotel service, that is, Hotel Statler service, means the limit of courteous, efficient attention from each particular employee to each particular guest. It is the object of the Hotel Statler to sell its guest the best service in the world.
  • No employee of this hotel is allowed the privilege of arguing any point with a guest. He must adjust the matter at once to the guest’s satisfaction or call his superior to adjust it. Wrangling has no place in Hotel Statler.
  • In all minor discussions between Statler employees and guests the employee is dead wrong, from the guest’s point of view and from ours.
  • Any Statler employee who is wise and discrete enough to merit tips is wise and discrete enough to render like service whether he is tipped or not.
  • Any Statler employee who fails to give service or who fails to thank the guest who gives him something falls short of Statler standards.

I updated this Service Code and have used it successfully in training programs and operations.  If readers would like a copy of this version in PowerPoint, please send a request for it to john.hogan@hospitalityeducators.com . I can also share with you an amusing  example of teamwork in delivering memorable and personalized customer service in a commercial from SN Brussels Airlines  in you tube format .  http://www.hospitalityeducators.com/articles/20100708

“Life is service. The one who progresses is the one who gives his fellow human being a little more, a little better service.” Elsworth Statler

Feedback or ideas for future pieces are welcome -contact me at info@HoganHospitality.com

Blog of Dr. John Hogan CHE CHA MHS 8.11.2010             www.HospitalityEducators.com

www.HoganHospitality.com

John Hogan is a successful hospitality executive, educator, author and consultant and is a frequent keynote speaker and seminar leader at many hospitality industry events.  He is Co-Founder of a consortium (www.HospitalityEducators.com) of successful corporate and academic mentors delivering focused and affordable counsel in solving specific challenges facing the hospitality industry. www.HospitalityEducators.com is a membership site offering a wide range of information, forms, best practices and ideas that are designed to help individual hoteliers and hospitality businesses improve their market penetration, deliver service excellence and increase their profitability.   Special introductory pricing is in effect for a limited time that also includes a complimentary copy of LESSONS FROM THE FIELD- A COMMON SENSE APPROACH TO EFFECTIVE HOTEL SALES.  If readers would like to contribute to the site, please submit your material for consideration to Kathleen@hospitalityeducators.com.  We are interested in expanding our global networks and resources as we support our membership.

Is there anything better than an angry customer?

Is there anything better than an angry customer?

Or Staff Responsiveness Best Practices on Engaging the “high-touch” side of our business #4

Keys to Success Hospitality Tips

Blog of Dr. John Hogan CHE CHA MHS August 8, 2010

It may sound a bit odd, but it has been proven repeatedly in almost every kind of business:  the most loyal customers are ones that experienced a problem and then were overwhelmed with the corrective action that not only addressed their problem of the moment, but continued to impress them with the concern to make them satisfied to the point where they do not even think of competitive services.

Angry is defined as “feeling extremely annoyed, often about an insult or a wrong”.  As travelers, we understand the frustration of traffic or of flights that are delayed for hours with feeble or no excuses. Our hotel guests can also have this sense of annoyance from the wrong kind of room assignment, from inadequate hot water or air conditioning, from a room not properly cleaned, a missed wake-up call, slow food service, meeting room services not delivered as promised and more.

Am I suggesting we should look for angry customers?   An emphatic YES.  I am not suggesting we should intentionally make mistakes to upset a customer, but the literally hundreds of moments of truth that exist in hotels and hospitality businesses daily often create problems that are upsetting to guests.

The first three segments of this series on the “high-touch” side of our business included feedback and suggestions from hoteliers and managers who participated in some of my workshops.

·         Segment 1 underscored the need for hospitality businesses to deliver a memorable and unique experience or face the likely consequence of being viewed as a commodity.

·         Segment 2 focused on identifying ways to encourage hotel general managers and their staffs to think about the “guest experience” , whether you are an independent hotel or brand affiliated  It offered concrete examples ways to avoid being seen as ordinary or a “commodity” in the area every guest experiences, regardless of hotel location,  room rate or level of service:  SLEEPING.

·         Segment 3 examined another essential topic that is of considerable significance to hotel guests everywhere: BREAKFAST.  Specific suggestions from hoteliers and restaurant managers were highlighted.

This segment addresses staff responsiveness and how effective responses convert those angry guests into loyal fans.

Point #1 – the word “service”. There are “FULL SERVICE” hotels, which include all luxury properties and resorts, most casinos and many HOTELS.    There should be no such thing as “limited service” by title or mind-set.  Hospitality is a service business and industry and in every workshop when this topic was discussed, the consensus was always to provide what the guest needed and wanted.

Point #2 – A satisfied guest does not automatically mean a loyal or repeat guest.  This means that hotels of today must anticipate problem areas and respond immediately when one arises.  This means that hotel owners and managers must allow and insist that their staffs do whatever it takes to meet the customers’ needs.

Point #3 – How should staff respond to a guest’s concern or complaint? The answer from every group was IMMEDIATELY and as completely as possible

As consumers, we personally know that our satisfaction and loyalty is earned much more by responsiveness and trust, than by frequent flyer miles or comp room credits.  There are certain airline and auto rental companies I avoid whenever possible and there are others I always check availability first.

Successes shared included:

  • Managers who personally participate in managers’ receptions have consistently better repeat guest statistics
  • Hotels with staff who make certain their managers know of a problem (regardless of responsibility) tend to perform better, have lower turnover and higher guest reviews and reports
  • Active listening programs like the lobby lizard really do work
  • Hotel owners and managers that reward publicly staff who take it upon themselves to solve guest problems have more repeat guests and a lesser need to find replacement guests for those who will no longer stay with that hotel or brand
  • Hotels that log problems for corrective action and follow-up aggressively have better performing properties
  • Companies and hotels that publicize their staffs’ community activities and responsiveness to guest problems again have higher quality assurance scores, lower turnover, and an easier time when occupancy and rate pressures are in the marketplace

A number of individual properties, brands and chains have worked to refine their staff responsiveness to these guest annoyances.  One of the most comprehensive and meaningful service codes ever introduced premiered almost a century ago by one of the most successful hoteliers of all time.  Details and the code will be in the next column.

Feedback or ideas for future pieces are welcome – contact me at info@HoganHospitality.com

Blog of Dr. John Hogan CHE CHA MHS 8.8.2010

HospitalityEducators.com, HoganHospitality.com

John Hogan is a successful hospitality executive, educator, author and consultant and is a frequent keynote speaker and seminar leader at many hospitality industry events.  He is Co-Founder of a consortium (www.HospitalityEducators.com) of successful corporate and academic mentors delivering focused and affordable counsel in solving specific challenges facing the hospitality industry.

www.HospitalityEducators.com is a membership site offering a wide range of information, forms, best practices and ideas that are designed to help individual hoteliers and hospitality businesses improve their market penetration, deliver service excellence and increase their profitability.   Special introductory pricing is in effect for a limited time that also includes a complimentary copy of LESSONS FROM THE FIELD- A COMMON SENSE APPROACH TO EFFECTIVE HOTEL SALES.

Keys to Success Hospitality Tip: Breakfast Best Practices on Engaging the “high-touch” side of our business #3

Blog of Dr. John Hogan CHE CHA MHS August 5, 2010

The full title of this series is Engaging the “high-touch” side of our business by instilling passion in our people and reader comments and feedback on the first two segments has been positive.   Segment 1 emphasized the authentic requirement for hospitality businesses to provide a unique experience or face the probable penalty of being viewed as a commodity.

Segment 2 defined in some detail the experience of today, whether you are an independent hotel or brand affiliated.   It also focused on identifying ways to encourage hotel general managers and their staffs to think about the “guest experience” and offered concrete examples from workshop attendees’ ideas on ways to avoid being seen as ordinary or a “commodity” in the area every guest experiences, regardless of hotel location,  room rate or level of service:  SLEEPING. Practical ideas addressing all five of the human senses were shared.

This segment examines another area that I have written on previously and that is of considerable significance to hotel guests everywhere: BREAKFAST.[1] I am recapping feedback and suggestions from hoteliers and restaurant managers who participated in some of my workshops.

FULL SERVICE HOTELS

  1. The competition from the Rooms Only Hotels in your marketplace is increasing and many of the mid scale chains provide complimentary breakfast. Providing an exceptional breakfast offering that makes potential guests decide to select your property is important.
  2. Breakfast is a chance to shine, as more guests and salespeople are viewing breakfast as an ideal time to “do” business, as well as the guests who are looking to start their day on a positive note. Hotel restaurants are frequently busier at breakfast than at other meals, unless your hotel is an upscale property with a high demand for business lunches. Shouldn’t your sales team show a restaurant that appears to be well used and popular?
  3. Time spent at breakfast is viewed by many as more useful than other meals, because all participants view this as a time for productive business for all parties. There is less likely to be quite as much warm-up banter, as everyone wants to get down to business.
  4. Breakfast at full service restaurants remains a best value, when compared to other meals. In challenging economies, this can be a deciding factor for hotel selection.

ROOMS ONLY HOTELS

  1. Many rooms’ only properties offer very attractive continental breakfasts. Managers and sales team can impress potential clients with a breakfast presentation that will be part of their guests’ stay.
  2. While many brands have clear guidelines, extra efforts in breakfast offerings have demonstrated returns for operators and satisfaction for guests.
  3. Remember that McDonalds’, Wendy’s, Subway and many other fast food restaurants recognized the value of breakfast in the last 5 to 15 years and turned formerly closed hours into periods of substantial profitability by meeting the needs of people who were looking for a quick, perceived value option for breakfast. For many family restaurants such as Denny’s or International House of Pancakes, breakfast remains their highest and most profitable volume period.

Participants who shared these observations also commented on several other high touch points in both full service and rooms only properties:

  1. Breakfast is the ideal time to interact with guests.  General Managers can learn a great deal about the guest experience by chatting with guests and active listening.
  2. Sales staff can make excellent contacts at breakfast.
  3. Menus and food offerings should change, either with the season or by some other plan.  Regular guests appreciate the basics, but also value some variety.  Rotating decorations that complement food specials does not need cost a great deal, and the variety can motivate the staff as well.

The next segment of this blog topic will share best practices on staff responsiveness to a guest’s concern or complaint, which can decide a guest’s satisfaction and loyalty.

Feedback or ideas for future pieces are welcome -contact me at info@HoganHospitality.com

Blog of Dr. John Hogan CHE CHA MHS 8.5.2010         HospitalityEducators.com, HoganHospitality.com

John Hogan is a successful hospitality executive, educator, author and consultant and is a frequent keynote speaker and seminar leader at many hospitality industry events.  He is Co-Founder of a consortium (www.HospitalityEducators.com) of successful corporate and academic mentors delivering focused and affordable counsel in solving specific challenges facing the hospitality industry. www.HospitalityEducators.com is a membership site offering a wide range of information, forms, best practices and ideas that are designed to help individual hoteliers and hospitality businesses improve their market penetration, deliver service excellence and increase their profitability.


[1] Principles for success – Understanding the Value and Power of Breakfast (two part series) and A Baker’s Dozen of Strategies for Hotel Restaurant Managers

Share Best Practices on Engaging the “high-touch” side of our business #2

The full title of the previous blog reinforced the emphasis of the series : Engaging the “high-touch” side of our business by instilling passion in our people and I appreciate reader response and feedback.   Segment 1 introduced an understanding of a genuine need for the hospitality industry to provide a unique experience or face the potential consequences of our hotel, restaurant, retail service or attraction being viewed as very ordinary or in other words, a commodity.

This second segment of the series further defines the experience of today, whether you are an independent hotel or brand affiliated.  In segment one, I shared some insights from Tennessee hotelier Johnny Walker of Nashville. He has been actively engaged in the hospitality industry for more than 35 years and is one of the region’s most experienced tour operators.  As a hotel owner/operator with multiple brands, he offered a number of ideas he felt were important for hotel managers today, including the message that “every room rental/stay must be viewed as an experience”

In a number of interactive workshops over the past two years, I have focused on identifying ways to  encourage hotel general managers and their staffs to think about the “guest experience” and how we might build that commitment of “high touch” into the mindset of every employee for every guest.

Recognizing the danger of becoming a “Commodity”, and seeking specific ways to avoid becoming ordinary, I focused on three areas in these workshops and am pleased to share some best practices from managers and owners of both branded and independent properties.

The first topic discussed is one that every guest experiences, regardless of hotel location,  room rate or level of service:  SLEEPING

These workshops were held across North America and participants had wonderful ideas and best practices of how to make the “sleeping” experience positive, memorable and unique.  The best ideas I heard included addressing all five of the human senses

  1. Sight – the guest room and the bed must be inviting.  This means neatly prepared beds, using pillows as décor and a sense of freshness to the eye as one enters the room.
  2. Smell – the fragrance discussion in hospitality is not new.  We all likely have fond memories of entering a bakery or a certain restaurant, yet too many hotels do not address this sensation.  Care must be taken in cleaning products used, and there are packaged scents available that can be subtly present in the guest room, which enhances the overnight experience of sleep.
  3. Sound – Rooms must be reasonably constructed or designed to block out street noise or external sound, as well as addressing the sounds of ice machines and elevators.  Suggestions by attendees included ways to identify and then deal with those noises.  A number of properties today include a CD player (with brand or hotel provided CDs)  and/or a higher quality radio that offers additional calming effects conducive for sleeping
  4. Taste – the general manager’s reception, fresh popcorn in the lobby, homemade cookies or other treats can be positive interactions for guests as they retire to their rooms. These can reinforce situations they have at home, and therefore find positive when traveling.
  5. Touch – as in #1 Sight above, the guest room and bedding must be inviting.  Well maintained, comfortable bed coverings with quality linens complete the five senses for a guest who is on the road every week or for those who travel only on vacations.

Participants who shared these observations also commented that the entire housekeeping and front office teams must be part of understanding that delivery of a good’s night’s sleep means each member of the staff contributing their own personal touches, smiles and appreciation of the individual guest staying at their hotel.

The next two segments of this blog will share best practices on breakfast and staff responsiveness to a guest’s concern or complaint.

Feedback or ideas for future pieces are welcome -contact me info@HoganHospitality.com

Blog of Dr. John Hogan CHE CHA MHS  7.29.10         HospitalityEducators.com, HoganHospitality.com

John Hogan is a successful hospitality executive, educator, author and consultant and is a frequent keynote speaker and seminar leader at many hospitality industry events.  He is Co-Founder of a consortium (www.HospitalityEducators.com ) of successful corporate and academic mentors delivering focused and affordable counsel in solving specific challenges facing the hospitality industry.   Services are designed to help individual hoteliers and hospitality businesses improve their market penetration, deliver service excellence and increase their profitability.