A really great book on life for anyone – BUT ESPECIALLY FOR THOSE UNDER 50

HOW WILL YOU MEASURE YOUR LIFE

 

200 page book. 3 sections. 10 chapters.

 

Doesn’t sound that different from many others we may have read over the years, does it?

 

Yet, this one is.

 

 

 

This was on one of those lists from a podcast company saying it was one of the most important books ever written and they consolidated it into an 18 minute audio recap.  While I listen to CDs on various topics regularly, I still try to read two books a week to keep my mind active and open to new ideas.

This is not a typical “self-help” book. Many of them have some good points, but just as many focus on a single message, often leading to other products to buy.  Nothing wrong with that.

I have a great deal of respect for many University and college professors and was proud to be affiliated with the Council of Hotel, Restaurant and Institutional Educators (CHRIE) for 6 years with a professional membership. I taught at three different universities and colleges as an adjunct professor over a 20 year period.  An issue I have with a good number of institutions is the requirement for research and studies that do not have much practical application for most of us.

This book and these authors do not take that approach.

The primary author, Clayton Christensen begins with life observations that many of his classmates, despite many achievements, were clearly disappointed with their lives. What faces many of us – failed marriages, issues with family and the weakening of many personal relationships are briefly and well stated as indicators of serious issues that negatively affected lives.

For background, Christensen is not a typical professor.  He has been involved in many different business and industries.  He is an author of substance and practical application.   He recognized issues about success and failure and talks about them

He challenges his graduating students with 3 unassuming questions to examine, measure, and improve their lives after college:

(Note- these are my capsules, not his actual questions)

  1. How do I need to do be to have a successful and happy career?
  2. How do I maintain and strengthen my relationships with my spouse, my children and cherished friends for the benefit of all?
  3. How can I be an ethical person in these changing times of growing duplicity and deceit?

The authors examine how to think about life, what causes what to happen, and why.  There are business case studies throughout the book that demonstrate their points

The authors discuss:

  • priorities – many questions we have asked or should ask ourselves today to find success and happiness in  careers, in  relationships and how to listen to the right inner voice we all hear
  • Motivation and how to assess what is really important to us
  • Money as neither good or bad, but a potential problem when it displaces everything else
  • Assessing job choices and a list of great questions for all of us
  • How-to’s on building and maintaining strong personal relationships
  • Building internal and healthy cultures- business, personal and family
  • Defining our own personal purpose in life

I am a boomer and above that age I mentioned in the title, but I found this book thought provoking and interesting for self-assessment.  I recognized life stages I did very well, and others I wish I had do overs. I saw some stages where I corrected my course and as impotently how I was able to assist others as a mentor, a guide or simply a life friend.

I really enjoyed reading this very different point of view on do-it-yourself analysis.
“How Will You Measure Your Life?”

If you find this review useful, please let Amazon and me know by clicking the helpful button below!

John J Hogan, CHA CMHS CHE CHO

John@Hoganhospitality.com    Office 480-436-0283   Cell 602-799-5375

Hotelier, Speaker, Educator, Author, Expert Witness

 

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.