Recommended Reading – Great American Hoteliers: Pioneers of the Hotel Industry

Great American Hoteliers   Stanley Turkel has spent his career with a number of well-known companies in management roles.  These include Loews, Sheraton and Americana.  He consulted with Dunfey (now Omni) and found his permanent home in his favorite city – New York.  Turkel is well-known in the hotel industry, from his writing, his hotel consulting practice, his expert witness service in hotel-related cases, as well as asset management and hotel franchising consultation. He is certified as a Master Hotel Supplier Emeritus by the Educational Institute of AH&LA.

At times, Stan can be sometimes controversial in his monthly editorials NOBODY ASKED ME, BUT… yet without a doubt he has left his mark on the industry with his insights, his shared knowledge, the questions he asks and in his writing.

Turkel loves to share insights and stories about the history of hospitality.  He was designated as the Historian of the Year in both 2014 and 2015 by Historic Hotels of America, which is the official venue of the National Trust for Historic Preservation. This honor is presented to an individual for making a unique contribution in the research and presentation of hotel history and whose work has encouraged a wide discussion and a greater understanding and enthusiasm for American History.

I just finished a book I meant to read years ago and wish I had done so earlier. Great American Hoteliers: Pioneers of the Hotel Industry is a fascinating and interesting refresher of where much of our industry found its foundation.

At a time when the industry is soaring and ownership is as widespread as it has ever been, it is appropriate to look at where some of that success originated.

Turkel considered 16 hospitality professionals he ranked as significant. Alphabetically, they are:

  1. John Bowman – founder of the Biltmore Hotels brand
  2. Carl Fisher – the developer of Miami Beach
  3. Henry Flagler – the multi-industry entrepreneur who developed much of eastern Florida through railroads and hotels
  4. John Q. Hammons – an early Holiday Inn franchisee who developed his own systems and destiny
  5. Frederich Harvey – a turn of the century western developer who innovated national parks and service delivery
  6. Ernest Henderson – a real estate developer who accidently created the Sheraton Hotel brand and came to enjoy some of the facets of hospitality
  7. Conrad Hilton – a name recognized by most, but with stories that are worth reading about how he came to unintentionally make hotels his niche
  8. Howard Johnson – a restaurateur now mainly forgotten, but who made interstate food and lodging an essential part of American travel
  9. Willard Marriott – the father of better known Bill Marriott, Jr, this pioneer had to be convinced to change his beliefs and switch from food service in many facets to hotels
  10. K M Patel – one of the early innovators from India who found inn keeping as a bridge to success for his and many other Indian immigrants who found being a hotelier an honorable profession
  11. Henry Plant – a lesser known developer who developed the Gulf Coast of Florida
  12. George Pullman – not usually thought of as a hotelier, this innovator created hotels on wheels. This is a mixed story of success and unpleasant actions, in my estimation
  13. A M Sonnanbend – creator of a family business that managed many of New York and America’s better known eastern hotels as well as creating several brands
  14. Ellsworth Statler – I admit to a bias here, in that I know a great deal about one of the most innovative and creative hoteliers America has ever known. While he passed away in 1928, his legacy remains in construction, service, training, profitability, marketing and value for both guest and hotel owner.
  15. Juan Trippe – known primarily as an airline executive, this Pan Am innovator partnered travel with both hotels and air travel
  16. Kemmons Wilson – a construction builder, Wilson used his personal family travel challenges to create a family friendly hotel that grew to one of the world’s largest and best known brands

A book worth reading for a University level program, or for those who are looking to understand how the past influences the future.

HIGHLY RECOMMENDED

Respectfully

John J Hogan, CHA CHMS CHE CHO

John Hogan 10.16 no.6 John J. Hogan, CHA CMHS CHE CHO[1] is a career hotelier, author and educator who has held senior leadership with responsibility in several organizations involving operational, academic and entrepreneurial enterprise. He has been affiliated in management roles with Sheraton, Hilton, Dunfey (now Omni), Park Suite (now Embassy Suites), Med Center Inns of America, Best Western world headquarters and independent properties. He taught as an adjunct professor for more than 20 years at 3 different colleges and conducted more than 5,000 classes and workshops in his career as of 2016.

He is Co-Founder and Chief Learning Officer of HospitalityEducators.com, which was founded in 2010 as a solutions center for hotel owners and managers.  HospitalityEducators.com completely updated and has been facilitating the Certified Hotel Owners program for AAHOA since 2012, with a participant approval rating of over 97% and more than 1400 certifications to date.

As the principal of Hogan Hospitality, he has provided litigation support, hotel expert witness services and hotel owner support services. He holds a number of industry certifications and is a past recipient of the American Hotel & Lodging Association’s Pearson Award for Excellence in Lodging Journalism, as well as operational and marketing awards from international brands. He has served as President of both city and state hotel associations and as an elected Chair of a major brand Hotel Owners Council.

Specific new services, workshops and keynote topics can be found at johnjhogan.com, including

  • WHAT THEY DON’T TEACH YOU AT HOTEL SCHOOL
  • IT’S THE SIZE OF YOUR IDEA, NOT THE SIZE OF YOUR BUDGET
  • 2017 HOT TOPICS ON SAFETY, SECURITY AND LEGAL ISSUES FACING HOTEL OWNERS AND MANAGERS THIS YEAR
  • 15 TIMELESS STRATEGIES FOR TODAY’S LEADERS

 

He is currently working with his partner Kathleen Hogan and others on several new projects including the HOTELIERMASTERMIND series, an eBook series with Howard Feiertag on hotel sales, two new web sites and a fresh set of Keynote and Workshop programs, hospitality services and columns.

He writes regular columns for a number of global online services, has published 500 columns and 225 blogs for industry publications. He co-authored (with Howard Feiertag, CHA CMP) LESSONS FROM THE FIELD – a COMMON SENSE APPROACH TO EFFECTIVE HOTEL SALES as well co-authoring the Supervisory Skill Builders from the Educational Institute. Hogan’s professional experience includes over 43 years in operations, service, sales & marketing, training, management development and asset management on both a single and multi-property basis.

He has supported numerous industry boards that deal with education and/or cultural diversity for more than 15 years. He served on the AH&LA Certification Commission of the Educational Institute and as brand liaison to the NAACP and AAHOA with his long term involvement in the Certified Hotel Owner program.

 

Contact: John Hogan John.Hogan@HospitalityEducators.com                 602-799-5375

https://www.linkedin.com/in/drjohnhoganchache/

 

[1] Certified Hotel Administrator (CHA), Certified Master Hotel Supplier (CMHS), Certified Hospitality Educator (CHE), Certified Hotel Owner (CHO)

 

 

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Recommended Reading : Hotel Mavens – A solid rating on the founders and history of one of old New York’s great hotels, and more…

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With the change in ownership and the re-purposing of one of America’s best known hotels, I am re-posting a review of a very different book than the others I have read by Stanley Turkel.   While it follows much of his same incredible attention to detail on the history of hotels (including a continuing commitment to accuracy) , this book focuses almost entirely on a very focused period of time, on a few people who made a difference in American hotel keeping and on one very famous hotel in the largest city in America.

1st of all, Turkel defines what a “maven” is, which is an expert who passes on knowledge to others. Turkel identifies three people he describes as mavens. While these are not household names to most people (even in the hospitality business), they played an important role in certain development of styles and protocols in American hotels
  1.  Lucius Boomer was chairman of the Waldorf-Astoria Corporation. Turkel explains in great detail about his noted career of managing or overseeing a number of major hotels in the northeast part of the USA from the early part of the 20th century through the 1940s.
  2. George Boldt is a lesser known, but important player in American hospitality and Turkel highlights the emphasis on service, grooming, standards and systems that Boldt introduced and maintained in his time (through 1916).
  3. Oscar Tschirky, or Oscar of the Waldorf as he was mainly known, is perhaps the best known of the three to the consumer or non-hotelier, as his tenure and flair at the famous hotel for a half century was well chronicled at the time and later via several food dishes named in his honor.

Turkel is an acknowledged authority on the history of New York City hotels, including both those that remain in existence today and those that have been converted or demolished. I considered it a sincere privilege to read and review Turkel’s earlier book Built To Last: 100+ Year-Old Hotels in New York , which was a fascinating read for anyone interested in history, building design and hospitality. The collection of historic properties that Turkel chose for that book featured 32 distinctively different properties. Some of them are well known such as the Plaza and the St Regis hotels, but most of them are less well known but just as interesting as they evolved from their original design and market positioning.Author Turkel was designated as the 2014 Historian of the Year National Trust for Historic Preservation and Historic Hotels of America in October, 2014 at their Awards Conference at the Hotel Hershey, Hershey, Pa. , for his zealous devotion to communicating the role of hotels in American business and life.

Hotel Mavens continues Turkel’s thorough sharing of this information through documented details about many well known American hotels – the Lenox in Boston, the Bellevue Stratford in Philadelphia, the Willard in Washington DC and many in New York City including the Claridge, the Sherry Netherland, the Plaza (briefly) and more. He explains how the Intercontinental Hotel Corporation came to be and how so many famous people and hotels came and went over a 50 year period.

In some places, this book is not always easy to read, and that is due to the evolution of language used 100 years ago that is included in this book.

There are diagrams and communications from the early Waldorf-Astoria days and a good number of black and white photos that bring the stories to life. He shares anecdotes and real-life stories that became standards in the industry, while others became dated and did not have staying power.

The section on “Staff News” about the original Waldorf-Astoria in February 1928 was written by hotel employees. Facts about the construction of the current Waldorf-Astoria were written by Lucius Boomer’s office in 1935 (three years after opening)

The Epilogue section of the book comes directly from the Waldorf-Astoria archives. As far as author Turkel knows, it has never been publicly reported before. Historically, it reveals unique material about the operation of the original and current Waldorf-Astoria hotels. For anyone interested in hotel operations from 85 years ago, it is chock full of revealing and fascinating material.

Hotel Mavens includes a good amount of material that is presented as and when it was written, which was sometimes a century ago. It refers to the attention given to foreign royalty and celebrities of the day at the Waldorf-Astoria and other hotels to the point of almost “drooling” over their importance. The condensed chronology from 1890-1929 includes information regarding the guests, famous and infamous who attended various functions at the hotel. One might think this dated, yet the social media and paparazzi of today do the same things with the names and faces in the news today.

The stories of how hotels were built, leased, sold, changed in function and more show how many of today’s business practices evolved.

I should also add an observation that in some places, the time line sequences do not flow easily to even a reader such as myself who is aware of at least some of the hotels’ histories or people. To someone who does not have a background in the industry, it might appear unintentionally vague or a bit confusing in places. Story lines and communication taken from the early days of the Waldorf-Astoria sometimes do not translate clearly in meaning as the language used today, which may cause a reader to be a bit puzzled at times.

Hotel Mavens is definitely worth reading and I recommend it to anyone who has an interest in the history of old New York, of how the hotel industry in America was influenced by big city hoteliers and investors and to anyone just interested in how life in New York City might have been before air travel, interstate highways, conventions, casinos and during Prohibition.

Good reading!

John J. Hogan CHA CHMS CHE CHO
Hospitality Educators
Hogan Hospitality

A solid rating on the founders & history of one of old New York’s great hotels, and how the hotel industry in America was influenced by big city hoteliers and investors
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About John J. Hogan

John J. Hogan, CHA CMHS CHE CHO[1] is a career hotelier, author and educator who has held senior leadership with responsibility in several organizations involving operational, academic and entrepreneurial enterprise. He has been affiliated in management roles with Sheraton, Hilton, Dunfey (now Omni), Park Suite (now Embassy Suites), Med Center Inns of America, Best Western world headquarters and independent properties. He taught as an adjunct professor for more than 20 years at 3 different colleges and conducted more than 5,000 classes and workshops in his career as of 2016.

He is Co-Founder and Chief Learning Officer of HospitalityEducators.com, which was founded in 2010 as a solutions center for hotel owners and managers.  HospitalityEducators.com   completely updated and has been facilitating the Certified Hotel Owners program for AAHOA since 2012, with a participant approval rating of over 97% and more than 1400 certifications to date.

As the principal of Hogan Hospitality, he has provided litigation support, hotel expert witness services and hotel owner support services. He holds a number of industry certifications and is a past recipient of the American Hotel & Lodging Association’s Pearson Award for Excellence in Lodging Journalism, as well as operational and marketing awards from international brands. He has served as President of both city and state hotel associations and as an elected Chair of a major brand Hotel Owners Council.

Specific new services, workshops and keynote topics can be found at johnjhogan.com, including

  • WHAT THEY DON’T TEACH YOU AT HOTEL SCHOOL
  • IT’S THE SIZE OF YOUR IDEA, NOT THE SIZE OF YOUR BUDGET
  • 2017 HOT TOPICS ON SAFETY, SECURITY AND LEGAL ISSUES FACING HOTEL OWNERS AND MANAGERS THIS YEAR
  • 15 TIMELESS STRATEGIES FOR TODAY’S LEADERS

 

He is currently working with his partner Kathleen Hogan and others on several new projects including the HOTELIERMASTERMIND series, an eBook series with Howard Feiertag on hotel sales, two new web sites and a fresh set of Keynote and Workshop programs, hospitality services and columns.

He writes regular columns for a number of global online services, has published 500 columns and 225 blogs for industry publications. He co-authored (with Howard Feiertag, CHA CMP) LESSONS FROM THE FIELD – a COMMON SENSE APPROACH TO EFFECTIVE HOTEL SALES as well co-authoring the Supervisory Skill Builders from the Educational Institute. Hogan’s professional experience includes over 43 years in operations, service, sales & marketing, training, management development and asset management on both a single and multi-property basis.

He has supported numerous industry boards that deal with education and/or cultural diversity for more than 15 years. He served on the AH&LA Certification Commission of the Educational Institute and as brand liaison to the NAACP and AAHOA with his long term involvement in the Certified Hotel Owner program.

Contact: John Hogan John.Hogan@HospitalityEducators.com                 602-799-5375

https://www.linkedin.com/in/drjohnhoganchache/

[1] Certified Hotel Administrator (CHA), Certified Master Hotel Supplier (CMHS), Certified Hospitality Educator (CHE), Certified Hotel Owner (CHO)

 

Insights of 10 Hospitality Professionals: Mentors and Counselors Come in All Sizes and Shapes

For those of us who have been in hospitality for more than 15 years or attended hotel school, the name Tony Marshall has familiarity to us in the area of hospitality law. His reputation as an effective communicator and keynote speaker introduced many of us to understanding what reasonable care meant and his unique brand of humor made him one of the industry’s most recognized names in the last 25 years of the 20th century.

Marshall passed away 10 years ago (December 2006), yet his work and memory linger with many. If one does an internet search on his name[1], the business side of his legacy remains evident.

This column is different, in that I asked the industry for some personal insights on Tony and how he affected them. I personally knew Tony in several ways: we both worked in the same small hotel (Bonnie Oaks Resort in Fairlee, VT) about 20 years apart and one of his best friends was Professor Steve Fletcher who was the department chair of the Hotel & Restaurant program at my alma mater, the University of Massachusetts. While Tony was almost always boisterous in public, I saw first-hand his human side when he was encouraging Steve Fletcher in the mid-1990s as he and his family were dealing with the final stages of Lou Gehrig disease.

[1] Remembering Tony Marshall, The Messenger of “Reasonable Care …http://www.hotel-online.com/News/PR2007_1st/Mar07_TMarshall.html


Thank you to Hotel Online, which originally shared this story on 1/4/17   https://hotel-online.com/press_releases/release/mentors-and-counselors-come-in-all-sizes-and-shapes 

Enjoy these examples of how Tony impacted others:

Doug Kennedy Kennedy Training Network www.KennedyTrainingNetwork.com Hollywood, FL 954.558.4777 doug.kennedy@kennedytrainingnetwork.com   

I will never forget the day I met Tony Marshall. At the time he was the Dean of the FIU School of Hospitality Management and also wrote a column for Hotel & Motel Management magazine. I was a 20 something entrepreneur with not much more than a wild dream to start a hotel training company.   A mentor of mine told me to reach out to prominent people in the industry to ask for advice, so I wrote a letter to Dr. Marshall. 

 A few days later I called his office. At the time most executives had gatekeepers and it was very hard to reach someone directly, but not Tony! He took my call on the first try. I asked if he might have a few moments in the near future to meet with me and he said “How about right now? Come on down.” I jumped in my car and drove down to his office on campus. 

I was SO nervous meeting such a prominent figure, but Tony right away made me feel at ease by joking around. When he came out into the waiting area I extended my hand but instead he grabbed my tie, turned it around to look at the label and said “Not bad, but you need to start buying better ties if you are going to make it in a hospitality career!” (This is advice that served me well I should add.)

Tony took nearly an hour out of his busy schedule to hear about my vision and review my carefully constructed business. After giving a long and thoughtful look, he responded that he did not think my business plan was going to be successful, as he thought I first needed more career experience. He then picked up the phone and after a brief chat handed it to me – it was a chance to interview for a job as the Director of Training for the Caribbean Hotel Association! Although it was a great opportunity, I turned down the job interview offer and thanked Tony for his advice, even though I was disappointed. On the way out he said encouragingly, “You are not the first person I told their plan wouldn’t work, and about 1 in 10 prove me wrong. Good luck in doing that young man!” 

About 10 years later when I had 45 employees working for my hotel training company I had another meeting with Tony to remind him that I proved him wrong, and he was very happy that I had done so!  Tony was a true hospitality superstar in every way.


Howard Feiertag, CHA CMP CHME Instructor at Virginia Tech and Higher Education Consultant Roanoke, VA (540) 231-9459 (mobile)  howardf@vt.edu  

Howard and Tony wrote feature columns in HMM for more than 20 years and they often appeared at the same brand, association or management company programs.   Tony had more than 400 columns over a 25 year period. Howard continues to publish his messages today and has more than 500 columns to date.

Tony was the best contributing editor of all the business trade publications as he was doing a monthly column for Hotel Motel Management magazine. He was always very articulate and humorous with his writings as well as with his speeches which he made frequently for the hotel industry. 

A wonderful person who is very much missed from all who knew him in our industry.


Rocco M. Angelo Associate Dean & E.M. Statler Professor Alumni Relations 

Florida International University, North Miami, FL 305.919.4500 angelor@fiu.com

Where do I begin with stories about Anthony Glade Marshall?

First Tony worked for me, then I for him as a faculty member at FIU’s School of Hotel Food and Travel Services, as it was known at first. When he became Dean of the School I was made Associate Dean & Chair. When he retired from FIU and joined the Educational Institute of the American Hotel & Lodging Association, publishers of my textbook, he became my publisher. Our business association and friendship spanned almost 35 years.

Shortly after Tony graduated from the University of Syracuse Law school, he was hired by the accounting and consulting firm Laventhol Horwath (L & H) where I was the manager of the hospitality consulting division in the New York City office. Some of the consulting assignments had a legal dimension that Tony was expected to address. It was one of my duties to familiarize him with the consulting practice by involving him in various assignments for which I was responsible. Our experiences together could fill a book; a cost study of the food service at a 1000 bed mental hospital, a study of food service at a University where we experienced a drug bust in the dormitory where we were quartered, among others.

As the L&H consulting business expanded so did the staff. In order to find the best and the brightest young candidates, we sent our consultants to the major hotel schools. Although I am a Cornell alumnus, I assigned Tony to the Cornell Hotel School and arranged for him to lecture in a class. Tony had established already his famous speaking style and I suggested to Dean Robert Beck that he sit in on the lecture. Dean Beck had to be out of town so he asked Assistant Dean Gerald Lattin to attend the class. Thus began the series of events that would bring Tony to Florida International University when Gerald Lattin became the founding Dean of the hospitality school and hired Tony to be his assistant.


Skip Stearns Co-Founder and Principal, Hotel Experts. LLC    http://www.thehotelexpertsllc.com/ Greater Boston Area 603-778-0110 Skip@THEHOTELEXPERTSLLC.com

Skip was a career hotelier with Dunfey (now Omni Hotels) before he and his brother Steve co-founded the Hotel Experts, LLC in 2002. The group works with experienced hotel experts (associate offices in six states) providing hospitality and hotel consulting, litigation support and impartial hotel expert witness research, reports and testimony.

Hi John:

What a great idea! I did not know Tony personally, but like many hoteliers of our time, I looked forward to every issue of H&MM. 

“At Your Risk” was usually the first place I turned to find the topic of the current issue, and the last article I read because I always enjoy saving the best for last.  

Tony’s experiences, lessons, humor and communications skills were fantastically relevant in an era when risk management was phenomenally undervalued. As hotel experts who focus on safety and security today, we find his column and textbooks still relevant, and wishing that more operators were familiar with Tony’s fabulous educational rants.


Al Hodge Implementation Project Lead at ADP Orlando, FL alhodge129@gmail.com  https://www.linkedin.com/in/al-hodge-4bb92a12  

Al was on the staff of the AH&LA Educational Institute for more than 20 years, servicing military education and major hotel brands in sales and support services.

Yes, I have a couple of Tony Marshall stories.

Tony was always more than just the President of EI – he genuinely cared about each member of his team.

After finishing the work at hand, he would draw us into his office for discussions on books and authors, ranging from the Harry Potter books to CS Lewis the author and he would, as usual, argue which were the better ones and why!

Many of the conversations we had were about life as opposed to work, which made me appreciate him as a human being.


Robert Rauch, CHA Chief Executive Officer RAR Hospitality San Diego, CA 858-239-1800 rauch@hotelguru.com www.rarhospitality.com   

John, I was a student at FIU when Tony Marshall was both Associate Dean of Hotel and Restaurant Management and Professor of Hospitality Law.

He convinced me to sign up and transfer from the University of Illinois in 1974 and was arguably my most influential professor through both undergraduate and graduate school though I had many great professors. He literally “lit the classroom on fire” to show us how quickly a restaurant can be destroyed by not taking “reasonable care” when serving table-side with a burner.

 His exams were difficult and required rigorous study. I learned so much from his class that despite not being an attorney, I taught Hospitality Law earlier in my teaching career, my long time parallel universe to being a hotelier. 

In my 40+ years in the hotel industry, there has not been one person who I have met who could more effectively capture an audience better than Tony Marshall. Many years ago, I almost had the guts to tell him, “Tony, I wish you did not smoke.” I always worried that he would get lung cancer. He will be missed for years and years.

 Bob


William D. Frye, Ph.D., CHE, CHO, CHIA Associate Professor and Program Coordinator – College of Hospitality & Tourism Management at Niagara University, New York                     Niagara University, New York 716-984-8274       wfrye@niagara.edu   

One of the classes Frye teaches is hospitality law @ Niagara.

He commented that “…YES I knew him, but not close. We interacted on several occasions and while we did not have a friendship, (more professional acquaintances), he was a GIANT of a man without a doubt.”


Steve Belmonte, CHA   CEO Vimana Franchise Systems, LLC Windermere, FL                      (407) 654-5540 Steve@VimanaFS.com www.VimanaFS.com    

As a former chairman of the Educational Institute and a long-time involved member of the AH&LA, I knew Tony Marshall very well. He had a genuine passion for what he did and had a grounded belief in the power of education. 

Tony and I would often discuss an issue which remains prevalent today. We, in the hospitality industry, do not get our fair share of the bright young people out there; they are simply going to other industries. So many young people look at the hospitality industry as a dead-end job.

I would like to propose this. A formal college education may not be in the stars for everyone for various reasons, however, the hotel and restaurant industries are the last of the giant industries in which a formal education is not a prerequisite for success. A man or woman can achieve enormous success through hard work and perseverance.

What we need to do more as an industry is to tell our story to the young people. The owners, general managers and hospitality executives need to let the young people know they were not born with a silver spoon in their mouth. A substantial number of successful hospitality people today started at the very bottom and worked their way up.

Many, many general managers crossed over from management into ownership at some point. That is an incredible and motivating story to tell. If you need an example, look no further than myself. I did not graduate from college. I started on Mannheim Road in Chicago at the age of 16 as a desk clerk for $2.20 an hour. I moved up to assistant manager, eventually director of food & beverage, then as the youngest general manager in the history of Holiday Inn when I become the general manager of the Holiday Inn O’Hare Airport. Through hard work, creative marketing and building solid relationships with my employees, I continued to grow and eventually became president and CEO of one of the top ten management companies in the nation and then president and CEO of the Ramada brand and now currently CEO and owner of Vimana Franchise Systems which owns the Centerstone Hotel brand, the Key West Inn brand, and the Independent Collection by Vimana.

Love for the industry, passion, hard work, will take you to places you could not imagine. The hotel and restaurant industry is alive and well. We just need more leaders to get out and tell their story.


    This hospitality law book is one of the most used in hotel schools in the US. It is co-authored by UMASS professor Norman Cournoyer (my undergraduate advisor), Anthony Marshall and Karen Morris who has the final story about Tony.

Karen Morris Professor of Law at Monroe Community College Judge, Brighton Town Court https://www.linkedin.com/in/karen-morris-7281041b    

Tony Marshall was one-of-a kind. A consummate story teller and presenter, his style was nothing short of flamboyant, mesmerizing, great fun, and very effective. Audience members did not soon forget his message. Here’s one of my favorite examples. 

Tony was everyone’s favorite speaker at annual conferences of the Council on Hotel Restaurant and Institutional Education (CHRIE), a national gathering of Hospitality Professors to explore new developments in the field. One year the title of Tony’s presentation was reported in the conference program as, “Don’t Mow Your Lawn on Friday Afternoon.” Attendees scratched their heads – what could he possibly be planning to discuss?? After much buzz, the date and time for the speech arrived. With curiosity peaked, the audience was in his palm before he even began. 

Turns out, the topic was exactly what the title described. He was concerned that professors have a bad reputation because their job is viewed by many as cushy with sweetheart hours. He knew the reputation was not accurate. While the hours are indeed long for the research portion of the job, they are somewhat flexible which can be misleading. Tony, as a true admirer of both the hospitality field and hospitality education, sought to avoid any taint to either. The speech discouraged any action that would smirch either profession, including conduct by practitioners that suggests an abundance of leisure time that makes on-looking neighbors envious. Save those household chores for weekends and evenings.

I have long admired Tony’s commitment to advancing the field of hospitality evidenced so exquisitely in that speech. Love you Tony!  


 

Marshall’s professional contributions to the industry continue to be noted with an annual award given at the Hospitality Law Conference held each year in Houston, this year April 24-26, 2017. http://hospitalitylawyer.com/conference-awards/

The Anthony G. Marshall Hospitality Law Award is given in recognition of pioneering and lasting contributions to the field of hospitality law. HospitalityLawyer.com Founder, Stephen Barth, says, “We honor Anthony Marshall for his pioneering and continued contributions to the field of hospitality law. He was the first to define reasonable care in a way that the average hotel manager, who is not a lawyer, could understand.”


Closing thought:

Tony proved he could communicate to hoteliers effectively through his writings and workshops, but he wanted to prove to the industry and academia that professors could actually run profitable hospitality businesses.

It was for this reason, Tony shared with me one time, that he actively sought the Presidency and leadership role of the AH&LA Educational Institute.   During his time there from the 1990s through 2005, his leadership significantly reduced EI’s debt, increased the revenue stream and created new and updated products by actively working with industry both domestically and internationally.

The number of people who specifically remember him diminishes with time, yet Marshall left a legacy that continues to positively impact us.  His active mentoring and supporting others, whether they were students, business team mates, brand executives or personal friends, made a difference.

I recall one of his favorite sayings was “You’re a good man (woman), and he’d use your name!”

Thank you for your lessons and wisdom, Tony, and you were a very good man!


All rights reserved by John Hogan and this column may be included in an upcoming book on hotel management. This article may not be reproduced without the expressed permission of the author.

The opinions expressed in this article are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the views of this publication.

Tags: tony marshallanthony marshallanthony marshall award

About John J. Hogan

John J. Hogan   John J. Hogan, CHA CMHS CHE CHO[2] is a successful hospitality executive, educator, author and consultant and is a frequent keynote speaker and seminar leader at many hospitality industry events. He is Co-Founder and Chief Learning Officer of HospitalityEducators.com, which was founded in 2010 as a solutions center for hotel owners and managers. He is also the Principal of HoganHospitality.com, which offers hotel expert witness services and hospitality consulting.

He is currently working with his partner Kathleen Hogan and others on several new projects including the HOTELIERMASTERMIND series, an eBook series with Howard Feiertag on hotel sales, two new web sites and a fresh set of Keynote and Workshop programs, hospitality services and columns.


[2] Certified Hotel Administrator (CHA), Certified Master Hotel Supplier (CMHS), Certified Hospitality Educator (CHE), Certified Hotel Owner (CHO)

Contact: John Hogan John@HoganHospitality.com / 602-799-5375

An Open Invitation to Share Your Best Stories About One of Hospitality’s Most Unique and Interesting Personalities!

By John Hogan

The hotel industry is one that involves a serious financial commitment that is complemented by the fact this is a people business requiring 24 hours a day of attention.  In businesses that never close, there are many issues that involve following legal statutes and codes, brand standards, industry best practices and even common sense.

Tony Marshall was the embodiment of an educator who crossed the line from Academic Educator to Corporate Conscience in the ways he helped define the common sense approach to reasonable care by his ongoing work.

Marshall was best known for his involvement initially as Dean of the School of Hospitality Management at Florida International University in Miami for more than two decades. During this tenure, he became well known to many hoteliers as a columnist and keynote speaker.  It was in his communication venues to industry that he shared diverse ideas that assisted many hotels try to focus on the everyday challenges.

Wanting to demonstrate that an academic could succeed in business, Marshall successfully addressed the financial and practical issues facing AH&LA’s Educational Institute as CEO in the early 2000s.

There are 1000s of students and graduates of the FIU program who likely remember his lectures or assignments.  I personally know he wrote more than 400 columns for one of the major hospitality magazine over a 20 year period and two books.  He delivered hundreds of workshops to industry and academic groups, with a balance of wit and some sarcasm but always with the goal of helping each of us to individually increase their knowledge and success.

Marshall passed away ten years ago (December 2006).   As one who recalls the impact of his messages, I invite readers of this online service who either personally knew Tony, or was impacted by his work or who simply has a personal story to share to do so.

Hospitality is natural home for storytelling.  Please share your Tony Marshall story with me by 12/20/16, so we can all have one more collective smile.   We hope to compile them for publication by 12/29/16.

Please send them to John.Hogan@HospitalityEducators.com.


All rights reserved by John Hogan and this column may be included in an upcoming book on hotel management. This article may not be reproduced without the expressed permission of the author.

The opinions expressed in this article are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the views of this publication.

About John J. Hogan

John J. Hogan, CHA CMHS CHE CHO[1] is a successful hospitality executive, educator, author and consultant and is a frequent keynote speaker and seminar leader at many hospitality industry events.  He is Co-Founder and Chief Learning Officer of HospitalityEducators.com, which was founded in 2010 as a solutions center for hotel owners and managers. He is also the Principal of HoganHospitality.com, which offers hotel expert witness services and hospitality consulting.

He is currently working with his partner Kathleen Hogan and others on several new projects including the HOTELIERMASTERMIND series, an eBook series with Howard Feiertag on hotel sales, two new web sites and a fresh set of Keynote and Workshop programs, hospitality services and columns.


[1] Certified Hotel Administrator (CHA), Certified Master Hotel Supplier (CMHS), Certified Hospitality Educator (CHE), Certified Hotel Owner (CHO)

Contact: John Hogan

John@HoganHospitality.com / 602-799-5375

Recommended Reading/Viewing from John J Hogan|Stories Of The Women and Men Lost On September 11

By John Hogan, CHA CMHS CHE CHO
September 10, 2015

2001-2015 = 14 years of memories, lessons learned and values appreciated

9-11 marked the first time the USA had been successfully attacked on its own soil in an undeclared war by terrorists and it changed the country forever in many ways. Innocent civilians of all religions, professions, ages and activities were affected in ways not imagined before.

I was with a  major hotel company on that day and my team and I were delivering a workshop out of state. The 100% closing of all airports nationwide, of some roads, and of many government and business centers was an eerie sensation for the week that followed.

In the years since that day, on those times when I am interacting with groups and others on September 11th, I make sure we take that moment of silence to remember and reflect.

I encourage you to watch the following You Tube and then read the short recap of real people’s lives that follow.

When the World Stopped Turning: A 9/11 tribute

Remember and Reflect

While this blog first was published last year,  the lessons we learned from each other and about inner strengths are worth another look.

American Lives: The Stories Of The Men And Women Lost On September 11

I have had this book for several years now – I found it at a used book sale. I almost passed it by, but was genuinely moved by the collection of personal stories complied by the staff of Newsday and the Tribune Company.   If you choose to pass on the book, I understand – it is not easy to keep returning to such a memory, but I strongly recommend you read the brief collection of thoughts below.

This is a mini-biography of some of the women and men who lost their lives on that day.  Some of what really moved me were the titles in the stories.  You will understand without even reading the full story:

  • Robert, there’s another plane coming
  • Dad, I gotta go. There’s smoke in here now
  • Take care of my kids
  • She still lives in his dreams
  • She opened up his world
  • A recovered ring completes a circle of life
  • He made every day a party
  • That day, she learned she was pregnant
  • After 20 years, they still held hands
  • A hero by any definition
  • He ignored his own order to flee
  • Firefighting was all he talked about
  • He dreamed of a school for autistic kids
  • She beat Hodgkin’s and eased others pains
  • Her family’s first college graduate
  • Death in a place of prayer
  • They knew what was important
  • She kept going back in
  • A rescuer who wouldn’t be stopped
  • A coach who brought out kid’s potential
  • Her husband watched her disappear
  • She tried to block the cockpit
  • The man who said “let’s roll”
  • He stayed to check on an elderly colleague
  • A cool army vet who helped others evacuate
  • He saved his wife, but not himself
  • A son is born as a father is mourned
  • and probably 200 more headings and stories

The book is only 200 pages in a slightly oversize format.  The five sections are to the point:

Little Brother, You’re MVP in our hearts, and as sub-sections includes
1. last phone calls
2. love stories
3. FDNY and
4. lost promises

The first into heaven
5. they died together
6. rescuers
7. mothers, fathers, sisters, brothers
8. on the planes

A Husband is Missing No More
9. High Finance
10. New Americans
11. In the Pentagon

A Man of Unusual Disposition
12. free spirits
13. tower people
14. legacies

The List of the Lost
World Trade Center Occupants
Pentagon
Emergency/Rescue Personnel
American Airline Flight #11 -WTC North Tower
United Airliners Flight #175 -WTC South Tower
American Airlines Flight # 77 – Pentagon
United Airlines Flight #93 – Pennsylvania

HospitalityEducators.com was created to help hospitality businesses address problems via a training and information resource site to help you increase your Hotel’s revenue, market share and profitability.   This site can help you solve your problems now!      Read More 

  Success does not come by accident or chance.

Contact us for assistance – John.Hogan@HospitalityEducators.com or 602-799-5375

A New Look at Family Business, the American Dream and Hospitality

By John J. Hogan, CHA CMHS CHE CHO

This should be either a required or recommended reading for hospitality and business development courses in Universities, as it sheds a different perspective on what should be important to define and achieve success.

Each of us feels we walk our own path and face our own individual struggles in life, and it is startling at times to realize how much we as people have in common regardless of our place of birth, our religion and our livelihood.

This 236 page book by Dr. Bharat Shah covers approximately 50 years in his journey and is an excellent example of the many life challenges we all face, whether the same or similar.

AMERICA – MY DESTINY contains a series of surprising contrasts in one family’s journey in India and the United States as they worked diligently to identify and embrace the best of both countries. The story takes place during a time when letter writing was the normal method of communication. Email, texting and cell phones were all in the future. The loneliness endured through separation of time and distance is expressed with such emotion as to be palpable for the reader.

Stories of the father’s successes and failures in business are detailed with examples of the bribery and corruption that was part of the everyday business world in the 1940s and 50s in India. The detailed descriptions of education in both countries reflect the sometime extreme efforts in learning new languages and new subject matter. The author shares the experience of adapting from a small village to a large city with the difficulties of trying to fit in. Education often comes from the classroom, but the author shares the life knowledge acquired in the street while moving to new cities, new states and finally a new country.

Discrimination is unfortunately real throughout the world, and the author relates heartfelt stories of intolerance felt at times in both countries. Some of the prejudice was based on religion, some on race; some appeared in business while other incidents were more personal.

The book offers insights on how life and personal relationships based on trust, integrity and honor were built over time. Dr. Shah explains how he came to study in America, because his bachelor’s degree earned in India was not enough of a basis for continued Indian education to become an engineer or doctor (the preferred paths for Indian men at the time). His stories of interacting and gaining knowledge about life in the US are touching and filled with many ups and downs as he first earned a Master’s Degree at the University of Tennessee in Knoxville and then a PhD at the University of Utah in Logan.

The story continues in the late 1960s when the Vietnam War is still ramping up, jobs are scarce and the American dream is not quite as clear. Dr. Shah is recruited by Nabisco and sent to Parsippany New Jersey where he uses his degrees in food science . Several years later, he moves to Winston Salem NC to work for RJ Reynolds Foods where he continues his professional development in research and quality assurance.

Dr. Shah shares human interest stories of cross country drives to new jobs in a 1954 Pontiac or a 1971 Plymouth Duster – both without a radio or air conditioning, as these were options not in the budget. He tells of his three year courtship, which was conducted totally by mail. The reader can feel the challenges of religion and finances that the two families had to address, which was not easy in the 1960s in India.

The author’s father had an entrepreneurial spirit in India, and Dr. Shah apparently inherited it. He shares stories over a ten year period of ventures from gift shops to imported shoes. Some involved life time friends, while others unfortunately included partners who became greedy and broke the trust. Dr. Shah did not lose faith in himself or America, but continued to grow professionally. He did not want to enter the motel business as his brother-in- law did, but he did earn a commercial realtor license in North Carolina. This led to his first unintentional entry into the lodging industry, which became a life changing event.

He discusses learning about the workings of the political systems in North Carolina and how he discovered that business people can make a difference in their communities and states regardless of their place of birth.

Bharat is quite open about the mistakes he and his wife Milan made in their early days in hospitality, and how their belief in themselves combined with a focused dream gave them strength to move forward as they fine-tuned their business skills. They dabbled in apartment ownership, but recognized that working with honest partners could allow them to acquire or develop profitable hotels and achieve successes not possible in India.

Many businesses in America are family businesses and Dr. Shah describes how his family business came to include his two sons. Today, the Noble Investment Group is an exceptional example of how to achieve this on a larger scale. There are more than two dozen photographs in the book – some of family, some of business and all contribute to the flow of the stories shared.

Bharat devotes several chapters on the value of leadership and communication. He shares the values he found in working with others as an early leader in the Asian American Hotel Owners Association (AAHOA), which was created to provide Indian hotel owners a united voice in the industry. His stories of the early days with no staff, donated office space and an uncertain future all contribute to the overall story of how many Indians sought to overcome obstacles by cooperative efforts rather than confrontation. His comments on the insights and values provided by Mike Leven (then president of Days Inns) add to the authenticity of the 25 year history of AAHOA in 2014.

There are narratives of sibling sickness and contrasting healthcare systems. Dr. Shah relates personal medical issues that he has dealt with in the last 15 years without complaining, but solely to help readers appreciate the evolution of medical care over time.

The final chapter is directed at the new generations of Indians whose families have migrated to America. He offers his insights on family, education, leadership and values to those who may or may not be involved in what became his industry.

While I did not work directly with Bharat, I have met him several times and had the opportunity to interact with him about his journey. His family’s story is one of courage, of being able to adapt and of self belief.

Highly recommended!

Success does not come by accident or chance.

Contact us for assistance.

Hospitality.jpg

Kathleen and John Hogan    #2    DSCN0412John J. Hogan CHA CHE CHO and Kathleen Hogan  MBA CHO are the  co-founders of  HospitalityEducators.com, which was created in 2010 to be a resource for hotel owners and professionals as they sought to improve market share, occupancy, operational efficiency and profitability.

The husband and wife team are transitioning the original membership site concept and evolving the business model today to a focused resource offering consulting, training, and individualized support to both hospitality and other service businesses.   Services include keynote addresses workshops, online support, metrics measurement, marketing and customer service from a group of more than a dozen experienced professionals.   While continuing to serve hospitality, the demand for these types of services is growing and can be personalized.

John Hogan is also the principal of HoganHospitality.com, which provides a range of expert professional services for hotel owners, including professional development for organizations, training, consulting and expert witness services.

Contact information:  Kathleen Hogan  480-436-0283,

John Hogan   602-799-5375 or service@hospitalityeducators.com

 

Heaven, by Hotel Standards | Observations from a New England Hotelier

People are drawn to hotels.  There’s something about the center of activity in a busy, full service hotel that attracts people from all walks of life globally..

The Parker House hotel in Boston Massachusetts has been open continuously since 1855, and is arguably the oldest continually operating hotel in the United States.

Mark Twain stayed here for a month  in 1877 and he is but one of literally hundreds of celebrities to have made this hotel very well known and appreciated.

Heaven, by Hotel Standards is a book about the history of the Omni Parker House, with information compiled by Susan Wilson.  On page eight of this book,  there’s a wonderful welcome letter from the current general manager, John Murtha, CHA. I had the privilege of meeting John, who is a gracious hotelier.   His letter is sincere and genuine, and  the information about the service of the general managers from 1927 until today helps to demonstrate a longevity and quality of what you seldom find in most brands or hotels today.

In addition to Mark Twain, this book identifies a Who’s Who of celebrities who have been patrons of this hotel   From the age of literature there are writers like Emerson, Thoreau, Hawthorn and Longfellow.  From baseball, there are some well known names ranging from Babe Ruth to Ted Williams to Carl Yastrzemski to David Ortiz.  The hotel has been a center of  of activity in politics with people ranging from Ulysses S Grant, Mayor James Michael Curley, Franklin Delano Roosevelt, John F. Kennedy, Colin Powell, Bill Clinton and most recently, and former Governor Deval Patrick as guests.  Boston has a strong theatrical presence in the theater district and hosted a wide range of prominent actors including John Wilkes Booth (of Lincoln assassination infamy)  Sarah Bernhardt, as well as more contemporary entertainers as Joan Crawford, Judy Garland, James Dean, Stevie Nicks, Yo Yo Ma , Rachel Raye and Ben Affleck.

The hotel itself was built by Harvey Parker, who relocated from his family farm in Maine.  The Parker family arrived in America in the 1630s and Harvey did not want to remain in agriculture.  After number of years in Paris, he arrived in Boston and began his first venture into the hospitality business with a restaurant.  The book does a balanced review, explaining the evolution of the family from the restaurant business and to finding a location for and building what became the Parker house.

The Parker House has had a long time reputation for food and hospitality.  It is credited with creating or perfecting Boston Cream pie, lemon meringue pie, Boston Scrod and of course, the Parker House Rolls.  The book shares an anecdote about Eleanor Roosevelt looking and her request for the recipe, which had been a well kept secret until that request in 1933.

Celebrity chefs at this hotel have included television personalities Emeril Lagasse, Bobby Flay and Martha  Stewart who all wanted to link their reputation with that of the well-known Parker House.  There are stories in the book of organic farming from local farms, orchards and dairies 100 years before organic cooking became popular in the rest of the world.

The Saturday Club was a literary discussion group and included Henry David Thoreau, Henry Longfellow, John Greenleaf Whittier, diplomat Charles Francis Adams, Dr. Oliver Wendell Holmes and many others, who enjoyed the culinary service and hospitality of the Parker house once a month for a number of years.  Charles Dickens resided in the Parker house during his 1867-68 lecture tour.

The Parker house is located  across the street from the old Boston City Hall and  is two blocks from the state capitol.  Every US president from Grant to Clinton stayed at this hotel at some point during their presidency.  The book and movie the Last Hurrah was based on the experiences and activities of longtime mayor James Michael Curley.  The Kennedy family were regular visitors to the hotel and former Speaker of the House, Tip O’Neal is pictured in the book’s preface.

There are interesting interviews with longtime staff and stories about the wonderful jazz greats who performed at this hotel over the years. Some of the staff during the  mid 20th century  included Malcolm X and Ho Chi Min, who worked in the kitchens.

The book also discusses the business aspects of the hotel.  In the chapter called Architecturally Speaking, there are detailed explanations of the transitions and how the hotel evolved and maintained its presence.  There were major changes in operations and styles, with a series of owners over a 50 year period.  Downtown Boston today is very successful for hotels, but hotels were not considered to have a good location downtown in the late 1950s through mid seventies and the Parker House suffered. It did recover with the New England Dunfey family acquisition and management, The Parker House today is an example of exceptional hotel keeping with the Omni name and ownership.

Many grand old hotels today have reputations of ghosts, and the Parker House is no exception.  There are amusing stories of possible sightings from hotel founder Harvey Parker to Charles Dickens. We will have to decide for ourselves if this is fact or fiction.

Pages 105 to 107 lists of dozens of well-known names who enjoyed the hospitality of the Parker House from Mohammed Ali to the Who.

——————————————————————————————————————–

I began my career as a New England hotelier, working in Vermont and Massachusetts, including at the 1500 room Sheraton Boston.   I worked for the Dunfey Hotels when they owned the Parker House and was interviewed for the #2 manager position.   A crisis at the Dunfey Hotel I was managing in Atlanta prevented that transfer, but I do recall the elegance and history of this fine hotel.  I would have enjoyed being part of the history of this fine hotel.

The title of the book is Heaven, By Hotel Standards, and it is certainly an interesting snapshot of successful and innovative Boston hotel keeping over three centuries

Strongly recommended.

John J Hogan CHA CMHS CHE CHO

HospitalityEducators
Hogan Hospitality

Success does not come by accident or chance.

Contact us for assistance.

Hospitality.jpg

Kathleen Hogan Ireland Sept 2013John J. Hogan CHA CHE CHO and Kathleen Hogan  MBA CHO are the  co-founders of  HospitalityEducators.com, which was created in 2010 to be a resource for hotel owners and professionals as they sought to improve market share, occupancy, operational efficiency and profitability.

The husband and wife team are transitioning the original membership site concept and evolving the business model today to a focused resource offering consulting, training, and individualized support to both hospitality and other service businesses.   Services include keynote addresses workshops, online support, metrics measurement, marketing and customer service from a group of more than a dozen experienced professionals.   While continuing to serve hospitality, the demand for these types of services is growing and can be personalized.

John Hogan is also the principal of HoganHospitality.com, which provides a range of expert professional services for hotel owners, including professional development for organizations, training, consulting and expert witness services.

John Hogan Sept 2013DSCN0215

Contact information:  Kathleen Hogan  480-436-0283,

John Hogan

602-799-5375 or service@hospitalityeducators.com

Workshops Available include: 

From the Chalkboard to the Front Line

What They Don’t Teach You at Hotel School

Focus:

  • Hotel Profitability
  • Hotel Sales
  • Marketing Ideas
  • Hotel Operations

There will always be an ongoing debate on the comparative merits of experience versus the knowledge acquired in formal educational settings.   The best lessons anyone can learn from hotel schools include an awareness of what really occurs on the front line in the actual hospitality setting.  This keynote transitions the academic message to the real world of running a profitable hospitality business.

 Click    here   for Keynotes and Workshops Available