General Managers – what are the hot spots causing you and your hotel the greatest challenges today?

Solutions for General Managers – A Short Survey – Please respond by 3/20

Please take the time to answer each question as accurately as you can. We are looking for the areas that you need the most help

https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/GM-Survey  

HE logo

Kathleen Hogan and John Hogan  

480-436-0283           Service@HospitalityEducators.com

John Hogan CHA CMHS CHE CHO and Kathleen Hogan MBA CHO are the co-founders of  HospitalityEducators.com, which was created in 2010 to be a resource for hotel owners and professionals as they sought to improve market share, occupancy, operational efficiency and profitability.  The husband and wife team are transitioning the original membership site concept and evolving the business model today to a focused resource offering consulting, training, and individualized support to both hospitality and other service businesses.   Services include keynote addresses workshops, online support, metrics measurement, marketing and customer service from a group of more than a dozen experienced professionals.   While continuing to serve hospitality, the demand for these types of services is growing and can be personalized.

John Hogan is also the principal of HoganHospitality.com, which provides a range of expert professional services for hotel owners, including professional development for organizations, training, consulting and expert witness services.

Contact information:  Kathleen Hogan  480-436-0283, John Hogan 602-799-5375 orservice@hospitalityeducators.com

Hotel Common Sense – Philosophy #2

HOSPITALITY PRINCIPLES of SUCCESS

Hotel Common Sense –  Philosophy #2

Or, why the Open Door policy no longer works…

Anyone who is familiar with my full-length columns or shorter blogs knows that I  am a fan of Tom Peters.  There was a period when he may have believed his own PR press a bit too much in the mid 1990s, but I have found his messages to be thought provoking with sound counsel that we need to evolve and change or we will not be around much longer.

Peters, in his first major book with co-author Bob Waterman, took the theme of one of the world’s leading computer companies, Hewlett-Packard, and expanded the notion of truly reaching out to the people in our organizations who are responsible for the bulk of customer contact and building customer loyalty.  They challenged us to look at the symbol of the open door, which has ceased to be a meaningful statement.

The Open Door used to mean an associate (better word for employee) could come to us and ask for help in resolving problems with overtime, schedules, a day off or other personal matters.  I maintain that the Open Door policy, once the symbol of the manager or leader who really cared about their staff, is just not effective any more. The reason I state this is I feel we must realize that the hospitality industry has embraced social media and immediate communication exists among our staff as well as our guests.

While the above situations of personal matters still exist, the reality of today’s hectic pace is frequently more complicated. Drugs/alcohol abuse, sexual harassment, extended families and other more complicated issues are realities of today. While some of us might naively prefer to think there are not serious problems in the workplace today, we need only to look online at the latest “headlines” to see the truth.

The hospitality industry is certainly not immune to the pressures of today’s realities. This industry has ample temptations (bedrooms, alcohol, cash, and “power”) and the added stress of long hours and the pressure to be profitable in periods of diminishing returns can be a manager’s nightmare.

Is there a solution?

Consider the OPEN FLOOR contrasted with the OPEN DOOR.  I am not trying to use a simple play on words, but rather I am focusing on the fact that we cannot rely on our “good intentions” of the open door to be really in touch with our staff.  There will always be some people who seek us out as managers, but the truth is we must take to the OPEN FLOOR every day, beginning today as we read this.  By this, I mean setting our priorities on what most of us say and consider to be our most important asset: our staff. The OPEN FLOOR means something as basic as managers and department heads warmly greeting each member of the staff each shift. It means being in the  kitchen, the laundry, the receiving dock, the security patrol, with the sales team on calls and in the parking lot each day with the people whose livelihood takes place in those areas.

Paperwork, reports and online promotions have their place and need to be addressed and submitted on time. Some of it can be (and should be) delegated like many Embassy Suites try to do with their assistant general managers.  All reports should be periodically reviewed to see if they are still useful (to anyone) or if they have become just busywork.

Howard Feiertag, my friend and co-author of LESSONS FROM THE FIELD, once shared his observations of a downtown New York City hotel.  He commented how EVERYONE (general manager, front desk, bell staff, concierge, F&B, etc.) shook hands with their fellow workers and colleagues when they first saw each other daily.

Like they were “friends.”

Imagine that, and in New York City.

I need  to call Howard and ask him if he knows if they still do this.

MBWA – Management by Walking Around – try it!

Hotel Common Sense Philosophy #2 = Learn to listen more, talk less. Management by Walking Around is Priority #1.

Keys to Success Hospitality Tip of the Week:   Focus on MBWA

A challenge to every manager who is responsible for 5 or more people:  measure your in and out of the office time and at the end of the week, see how much time you spent ACTIVELY INTERACTING with your team.

The goal is 70% of your time out of the office – how did you do?

What will you do next week?

HospitalityEducators.com Recommended Reading | The Customer Rules: The 39 Essential Rules for Delivering Sensational Service


Customer Rules

 

The author of this book has been responsible in his career for the customer service at one of the world’s best known service delivery companies -DisneyWorld. He was responsible for 40,000 people in hotels, theme parks, shopping, entertainment and sports centers.

Disney’s often been used as a training center for leadership and guest service and Lee Cockerell’s book on delivering sensational service is right on.

There are 39 chapters or rules in this 179 page book and they are all direct, common sense in approach in logical.

The introduction states simply “be nice”. He says this means being friendly, polite, pleasant, considerate and skilled. He cautions that rules and procedures will not work if you do not have the right people doing the right job. This is more common sense, but we have discovered in so many businesses that common sense is relatively unknown.

Examples of rules include:
Number 1 – customer service is not a department
Number 4 – do not get bored with the basics
Number 12- rehearse, rehearse, rehearse
Number 17- listen up
Number 24- do not make promises, make guarantees
Number 38- keep doing it better

The other 33 are just as direct and understandable, yet they need to be understood.

I have been in the hospitality industry my entire career and I find this a logical, easy-to-follow set of guidelines for anyone providing service to others.

Highly recommended!

John J Hogan CHA CMHS CHE CHO
HospitalityEducators
Hogan Hospitality

Success does not come by accident or chance.

Contact us for assistance.

Hospitality.jpg

Kathleen Hogan Ireland Sept 2013John J. Hogan CHA CHE CHO and Kathleen Hogan  MBA CHO are the  co-founders of  HospitalityEducators.com, which was created in 2010 to be a resource for hotel owners and professionals as they sought to improve market share, occupancy, operational efficiency and profitability.

The husband and wife team are transitioning the original membership site concept and evolving the business model today to a focused resource offering consulting, training, and individualized support to both hospitality and other service businesses.   Services include keynote addresses workshops, online support, metrics measurement, marketing and customer service from a group of more than a dozen experienced professionals.   While continuing to serve hospitality, the demand for these types of services is growing and can be personalized.

John Hogan is also the principal of HoganHospitality.com, which provides a range of expert professional services for hotel owners, including professional development for organizations, training, consulting and expert witness services.

John Hogan Sept 2013DSCN0215

 

 

Contact information:  Kathleen Hogan  480-436-0283,

John Hogan

602-799-5375 or service@hospitalityeducators.com

Workshops Available include: 

From the Chalkboard to the Front Line

What They Don’t Teach You at Hotel School

Focus:

  • Hotel Profitability
  • Hotel Sales
  • Marketing Ideas
  • Hotel Operations

There will always be an ongoing debate on the comparative merits of experience versus the knowledge acquired in formal educational settings.   The best lessons anyone can learn from hotel schools include an awareness of what really occurs on the front line in the actual hospitality setting.  This keynote transitions the academic message to the real world of running a profitable hospitality business.

Click    here   for Keynotes and Workshops Available 

Recommended Reading from HospitalityEducators.com | Five Stars: Putting Online Reviews to Work for Your Business

5 starsAs a consumer, author, and educator who is on the road many weeks each year, I regularly submit online reviews. I try to be fair, honest and helpful to both the business and other consumers.

As a hotelier and professional seminar leader who works with hotel owners and managers in trying to help them improve their ratings, this book makes sense and I intend to recommend parts of it.

I find some of the book logical, but some it very repetitive. Some of the chapters are hard to follow, while others offer very specific suggestions. It has excellent insights for rookies, but some of the messages are a bit too fundamental for many businesses.

Many of the graphics and illustrations are unnecessarily too small to have much value as they are very hard to read.

It is overall a solid primer and good for businesses who are just entering the digital age. The authors do a credible job at explaining how different sites (Google + vs. Yelp vs. TripAdvisor, etc.) work and then offering ideas on how to use different approaches for these sites.

“Five Stars” authors Couzin and Grappone offer some practical answers and possible ways to make online reviews a positive marketing avenue for business.

Recommended!

Dr. John Hogan
Hospitality Educators
Hogan Hospitality

 

John Hogan       Kathleen Hogan

Hospitality.jpg

Kathleen Hogan Ireland Sept 2013John Hogan Sept 2013DSCN0215Dr. John Hogan CHA CMHS CHE CHO and Kathleen Hogan MBA CHO are the co-founders of  HospitalityEducators.com, which was created in 2010 to be a resource for hotel owners and professionals as they sought to improve market share, occupancy, operational efficiency and profitability.  The husband and wife team are transitioning the original membership site concept and evolving the business model today to a focused resource offering consulting, training, and individualized support to both hospitality and other service businesses.   Services include keynote addresses workshops, online support, metrics measurement, marketing and customer service from a group of more than a dozen experienced professionals.   While continuing to serve hospitality, the demand for these types of services is growing and can be personalized.

John Hogan is also the principal of HoganHospitality.com, which provides a range of expert professional services for hotel owners, including professional development for organizations, training, consulting and expert witness services.

Contact information:  Kathleen Hogan  480-436-0283, John Hogan 602-799-5375 or  service@hospitalityeducators.com

Keynotes: 

Recommended Reference from HospitalityEducators.com | Hospitality Law by Stephen Barth

A University textbook is not normally considered light reading, yet a number of them can offer us valuable information and resources.

This is a law book used in university classes. It is very detailed, includes many solid examples and case studies. The Q&A sections at the end reinforce the highlights made throughout each chapter.  The headings of the 15 chapters are self explanatory and offer insights and potential direction.

Hospitality Law

 

  1.  Prevention Philosophy
  2. Government Agencies Affecting Hospitality
  3. Business Structures
  4. Business Contracts
  5. Significant Hospitality Contracts
  6. Legally Managing Property
  7. Legally Selecting Employees
  8. Legally Managing Employees
  9. Your Responsibilities as a Hospitality Operator
  10. Your Responsibilities as a Hospitality Operator to Guests
  11. Your Responsibilities for Guest Property
  12. Your Responsibilities when Serving Food & Beverage
  13. Legal Responsibilities in Travel and Tourism
  14. Safety and Security Issues
  15. Managing Insurance

In addition to this reference book, I would also recommend The 2015 Hospitality Law Conference    http://hospitalitylawconference.com/ , which is not just for lawyers.

From development deals to management agreements, from food and beverage liability to labor and employment, and from claims management to anti-trust issues, the latest cases, trends and challenges in compliance, finance, law, risk, safety, and security are up for exploration at the 13th Annual Hospitality Law Conference, February 9-11, 2015.

The Owner Management Summit, co-located with the Hospitality Law Conference, intersects legal, finance and technology and includes sessions on: who owns the data, who is responsible for the data, development and unwinding management contracts.

I will write a separate column on this next week.

John Hogan       Kathleen Hogan

Hospitality.jpg

Kathleen Hogan Ireland Sept 2013John Hogan Sept 2013DSCN0215Dr. John Hogan CHA CMHS CHE CHO and Kathleen Hogan MBA CHO are the co-founders of  HospitalityEducators.com, which was created in 2010 to be a resource for hotel owners and professionals as they sought to improve market share, occupancy, operational efficiency and profitability.  The husband and wife team are transitioning the original membership site concept and evolving the business model today to a focused resource offering consulting, training, and individualized support to both hospitality and other service businesses.   Services include keynote addresses workshops, online support, metrics measurement, marketing and customer service from a group of more than a dozen experienced professionals.   While continuing to serve hospitality, the demand for these types of services is growing and can be personalized.

John Hogan is also the principal of HoganHospitality.com, which provides a range of expert professional services for hotel owners, including professional development for organizations, training, consulting and expert witness services.

Contact information:  Kathleen Hogan  480-436-0283, John Hogan 602-799-5375 or  service@hospitalityeducators.com

Keynotes: 

Resolving Problems between the Boss and Yourself | Dr. Marc Clark Guest Blog from HospitalityEducators.com

Resolving Problems between the Boss and Yourself

Use the following checklist to assist you when dealing with problems.

When a potential or real problem arises:

  1. Acknowledge that there is a problem. Most problems with a boss are resolved by accommodation
  2. Identify possible solutions in dealing with the problem.
  3. Contact boss about the problem and set up discussion time.

During the meeting:

  1. Inform boss of the problem. Use disarming tactic to reveal the problem: “Boss, I need your help in dealing with a situation.”
  2. Acknowledge the boss’s position of authority in dealing with the problem.
  3. State the problem objectively.
  4. Be mindful of a threatening response. Example: “Are you suggesting that I might be the problem?”
  5. Ask your boss for possible recommendations and solution options in dealing with the problem.
  6. Thank the boss for his or her time, courtesy, and assistance with the matter.

After the meeting:

  • Follow up. Tell the boss how the solution is working.

TIPS TO PONDER:

  1. Do not take the problem personally.
  2. Empathize by putting yourself in your boss’s shoes.
  3. Be an active listener to his or her responses.
  4. Be open-minded.
  5. Don’t attempt to change the subject.
  6. Don’t interrupt; you will get a chance to speak.
  7. Maintain personal integrity.

Dr. Marc Clark, CHA, CHRE, CHE, CHO
President & CEO at SmartBizzOnLine.com

Conflict with your boss is always uncomfortable.  These tips offer tangible ways to address this situation.

Toss Out Useless Paperwork in Hospitality Businesses

Principles for Success

Toss Out Useless Paperwork in Hospitality Businesses

by Dr. John Hogan, CHA CHE CMHS CHO          

Ten possible rules for streamlining office systems, whether they are computer generated or created on paper by individuals

Some potential items for consideration, whether you are the “chief” officer in management, marketing, finances or human resources, might include:

  1. Always question the traditional assumption – “we have always done it that way”. The question becomes “why?
  2. Evaluate the purpose and use of all time sensitive reports. These include forecasts going forward and aging reports looking backward.
  3. Define the problem before deciding a solution – this may sound a bit silly, but determine bottlenecks, and ROI before adding more reports.
  4. Ask the right people the right questions in evaluating the value and use of reports.
  5. Keep paperwork simple and understandable in language and use. If the report topic is complex, the cover sheet should be fundamental.
  6. Information and reports are only of value if people understand their value. That means training, discussion and usefulness.
  7. Enforce the system – the new, simpler reports must be submitted, reviewed and discussed on time. Consistently.
  8. Monitor information systems and always look for improvements.
  9. Remember hospitality is supposed to include and focus on service and high touch. Do not overlook the value of training and service issues in reports and measurement. This should include senior level management proactively interacting
  10. Reports and paperwork are important components of systems, but systems need to be kept in perspective

If you would like more details on this, send a note to john.hogan@hospitalityeducators.com

What are you doing at your hotel, restaurant or hospitality business?

Hospitality Tip of the Week®: “Manage Systems. Lead People. Coach Your Team.

Be a Real Mentor.”       John Hogan, Hotel Common Sense® # 13

Getting the Most out of Your Franchise Investment – Making Hospitality More Profitable Part of the  Keys To Success Workshop Series

KEYS TO SUCCESSis the umbrella title for our programs, hospitality services and columns. This year’s writings focus on a variety of topics for hotel owners, managers and professionalsincluding “HOW TO” articles, HOSPITALITY CONVERSATIONS®, Lessons from the Field®, Hotel Common Sense® and Principles for Success

Feel free to share an idea for a column at anytime or contact me regarding consulting, customized workshops, speaking engagements … And remember – we all need a regular dose of common sense.

John Hogan is a successful hospitality executive, educator, author and consultant and is a frequent keynote speaker and seminar leader at many hospitality industry events. He is Co-Founder of a consortium (www.HospitalityEducators.com) of successful corporate and academic professionals delivering focused and affordable counsel in solving specific challenges facing hospitality today.

www.HospitalityEducators.com is a membership site offering a wide range of information, forms, best practices and ideas designed to help individual hoteliers and hospitality businesses improve their market penetration, deliver service excellence and increase their profitability. Individuals wishing to contribute materials may send themKathleen@HospitalityEducators.com. Special pricing is in effect for a limited time that also includes a complimentary copy of LESSONS FROM THE FIELD- A COMMON SENSE APPROACH TO EFFECTIVE HOTEL SALES.

Consulting Expertise and Research Interest

  1. Sales Management and training
  2. Turn-around and revenue management
  3. Professional Development for the Organization and the Individual
  4. Customer Service
  5. Making Cultural Diversity Real
  6. Developing Academic Hospitality programs
  7. Medical Lodging Consulting

If you need assistance in any of these areas or simply an independent review or opinion on a hospitality challenge, contact me directly for a prompt response and very personalized attention.

www.HoganHospitality.com

Your Hospitality Resource for the Hotel Owner, Innkeeper, Manager and Hospitality Industry Associations

http://www.linkedin.com/in/drjohnhoganchache

CONTACT

Dr. John Hogan, CHE CHA CMHS CHO

United States – Phoenix, Phone: 602-799-5375

www.hoganhospitality.com/ Email: info@hoganhospitality.com

%d bloggers like this: