Recommended Reading from HospitalityEducators.com | The Rules of Management : A Definitive Code for Managerial Success

 The Rules of Management, Expanded Edition: A Definitive Code for Managerial Success

: A Definitive Code for Managerial Success

by Richard Templar
Recommended
Comment:“A Great Resource for the Rising Professional and Mid-Level Manager of Today!
I hope readers of this review will not take my title to mean this is only for the rising professional- it can be a great refresher for any level of manager, but I find it to be a top notch resource for those who are on their way up.

A recap
* 227 pages , divided into two main sections:
1 – Managing Your Team and 2- Managing Yourself

* 106 “rules” dealing with hiring, motivating, disciplining, training, coaching and all that a manager should be doing regularly

* “Words of Wisdom” at the end of each of the two pages of “rules” that has a reflective quote or observation

I could expand my comments but I have discovered that brevity sometimes hits the mark better. This is a 5 Star Rating recommendation and its direct and to the point messages are well crafted and of real value.

As always, comments and feedback are welcome

John J Hogan, Ph.D. CHA CHE CMHS         Mobile 602-799-5375
Hotelier, Speaker, Educator, Columnist

2011 Keys to Success Programs are results driven sessions, aimed at building competitive advantage.   Details can be found at both sites.

Program # 2      
Step by Step Operational Solutions – Making the Correct Decisions (Keynote)

Program # 10     How to Stop Your Profit Drain (Interactive Workshop)

These sessions were created to encourage middle-level managers and rising professionals the insights to make better decisions in every day hospitality situations.

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From A Baker’s Dozen of Strategies to Make Your Hotel More Profitable Now| Tip #1 – Create or participate in a sales blitz campaign with your brand, regional partners, co-op or local Convention and Visitors’ Bureau (CVB)

A Baker’s Dozen of Strategies to To Make Your Hotel More Profitable
1.  Create or participate in a sales blitz campaign with your brand, regional partners, co-op or local Convention and Visitors’ Bureau (CVB)

In this day of global choices and at times illogical discounting, the need to keep your hospitality business name and identity visible and fresh in the minds of existing and
potential customers. Working with others in a collaborative effort will increase your market presence and will allow you to promote your business in professional and synergistic ways.

Sales blitzes are often supported by online, mail and advertising efforts as well.

A Baker’s Dozen of Strategies to To Make Your Hotel More Profitable

The full list of tips is available @   HospitalityEducators.com

This resource began with definitions of the words “profits” and “profitability. ” Those words and sentiments are not for hotel owners and managers alone.  The HospitalityEducators.com site has segments specifically dealing with this topic and all 13 strategies.

    Dr. John Hogan, CHE CHA working with attendees at the award winning TH&LA Short Course

Feel free to share an idea for a column at info@hoganhospitality.com anytime or contact me regarding consulting, customized workshops, speaking engagements … And remember – we all need a regular dose of common sense.

John Hogan is a successful hospitality executive, educator, author and consultant and is a frequent keynote speaker and seminar leader at many hospitality industry events.  He is Co-Founder of a consortium (www.HospitalityEducators.com) of successful corporate and academic professionals delivering focused and affordable counsel in solving specific challenges facing hospitality today. www.HospitalityEducators.com is a membership site offering a wide range of information, forms, best practices and ideas designed to help individual hoteliers and hospitality businesses improve their market penetration, deliver service excellence and increase their profitability. Individuals wishing to contribute materials may send them Kathleen@HospitalityEducators.com.    

Special   pricing is in effect for a limited time that includes a complimentary copy of LESSONS FROM THE FIELD- A COMMON SENSE APPROACH TO EFFECTIVE HOTEL SALES, one-on-one consulting and an eBook.

Dr. John Hogan, CHE CHA CMHS          United States – Phoenix, Phone: 602-799-5375
www.hoganhospitality.com/ Email: info@hoganhospitality.com.

HospitalityEducators.com shares: “Best Practice Ideas from A Major Hospitality Association : Go Green Tips”

Hospitality Associations play a major role in the industry.  I have been personally involved in many city and state associations, as well as serving on a number of commissions and councils for the American Hotel & Lodging Association.    I was honored to have served as the elected President of both the Nashville Hotel Association and the Tennessee Hospitality Association.
I am pleased to share with our readers and members this information from the web site of The Tennessee Hospitality Association.       John Hogan

“Go Green” Tip of the Week                  Tennessee Hospitality Association

The Association is committed to sharing as many ideas and best practices as possible . Below you will find some “Go Green” Tip of the Week. We would appreciate any feedback you would be willing to provide. Please reply to this Discussion Board post with comments and suggestions.  FYI  – Tennessee Hospitality Association – TnHA.   We changed the tip name from “Go Green” to “TN Green” to coincide with our Tennessee Green Hospitality initiative. Please check out http://www.tnhospitality.net/ for more details.

Joy Miller, TnHA/GNHA          Phone: (615) 385-9970
Email: joy@tnhospitality.net

  • “Go Green” Tip #1: Form an Environmental Committee to develop an Environmental Green Plan for energy, water, & solid waste use.
  • “Go Green” Tip #2: Monitor electric, gas, water, & waste usage on a monthly & annual basis.
  • “Go Green” Tip #3: Use compact fluorescent lamps instead of incandescent lamps when possible.
  • “Go Green” Tip #4: Install digital thermostats in guestrooms & throughout property.
  • “Go Green” Tip #5: Implement a towel and/or linen reuse program.
  • “Go Green” Tip #6: Install 2.5 gallons/minute shower heads or less in all guestroom baths and any employee shower areas.
  • “Go Green” Tip #7: Observe Earth Hour. Tennessee is an official Earth Hour state and will turn off the lights at the state capitol building.
  • In 2009, 2010 and 2011, hundreds of millions of people around the world showed their support by turning off their lights for one hour. Earth Hour will continue to be a global call to action to every individual, every business, and every community. Observing Earth Hour is a way to stand up, to show leadership, and to be responsible for our future.
  • “Go Green” Tip #8: Install 1.6-gallon toilets in all guestrooms.
  • TN Green Tip #9: Implement a recycling program, including public spaces, to the full extent available. Document your efforts.
  • TN Green Tip #9.5: Attend Nashville’s Annual Earth Day Festival at Centennial Park .                    Visit http://www.nashvilleearthday.org/index.php?p=1 for more information.
  • TN Green Tip #10: Implement a recycling program for hazardous materials found in fluorescent bulbs, batteries, and lighting ballasts through licensed service providers.
  • TN Green Tip #11: Celebrate Earth Day April 22nd! 🙂
  • TN Green Tip #12: Purchase Energy Star labeled appliances and equipment.
  • TN Green Tip #13: Paper products should have 20% or more post consumer recycled content.
  • TN Green Tip #14: Large operations should work with energy/engineering consultants regarding their needs.
  • TN Green Tip #15: Pay attention to off-hour systems, and make sure they are functioning correctly.
  • TN Green Tip #16: In kitchen prep sinks, use spray-nozzles that automatically close to rinse dishes.
  • TN Green Tip #17: Control irrigation using a rain gauge or soil moisture sensor.
  • TN Green Tip #18: The priority in solid waste management is Reduce, Reuse, & Recycle.
  • TN Green Tip #19: Install sub-meters on water lines serving cooling towers, swimming pools, & irrigation systems.
  • TN Green Tip #20: Implement a guestroom recycling program.
  • TN Green Tip #21: Eliminate or substantially reduce the use of individual bottles of water for meetings and breakout service. Replace individual bottles with either larger refillable bottled water dispensers or with tap or filtered water table top dispensers similar to those used to dispense other cold beverages such as lemonade or iced tea.

Fast Facts About Tennessee’s Hospitality Industry:

1) In 2008, Tennessee tourism generated a $14.4 billion economic impact to the state’s economy.
2) More than 182,300 Tennesseans are now employed in the state’s tourism industry.
3) Payroll generated by direct travel spending reached $5.3 billion in 2008.
4) Tennessee’s overnight and day-trip visitors provided $1.2 billion in state and local sales tax revenues, which accounts for another billion dollars in tax revenues for the second consecutive year.
5) The Tennessee Hospitality Association consists of 300 hotels representing 40,000 rooms and over 700 restaurants statewide.
6) TnHA also represents over 200 additional businesses that are preferred vendors and associate members.

The hospitality industry provides important business revenue, jobs, and tax dollars, and without the hospitality industry, either significant tax increases or deep budget cuts would need to be made.  It is important to have instant access to state statistics to share with our industry partners, business leaders, and elected officials.

These detailed facts can be found at http://tnvacation.com/industry/marketing/ under the 2008 Impact Study, and Appendix A reveals a county by county study of the impact of the hospitality industry, as well.  The information above has been provided by the TN Department of Tourist Development and the Tennessee Hospitality Association.

KEYS TO SUCCESS is the umbrella title for our 2011 programs, hospitality services and columns. This year’s writings focus on a variety of topics for hotel owners, managers and professionals including both my “HOW TO” articles, HOSPITALITY CONVERSATIONS™, Lessons from the Field™, Hotel Common Sense™ and Principles for Success  

 Feel free to share an idea for a column at john.hogan@hospitalityeducators.com anytime or contact me regarding consulting, customized workshops, speaking engagements … And remember – we all need a regular dose of common sense.

John Hogan is a successful hospitality executive, educator, author and consultant and is a frequent keynote speaker and seminar leader at many hospitality industry events. He is Co-Founder of a consortium (www.HospitalityEducators.com) of successful corporate and academic professionals delivering focused and affordable counsel in solving specific challenges facing hospitality today.

www.HospitalityEducators.com is a membership site offering a wide range of information, forms, best practices and ideas designed to help individual hoteliers and hospitality businesses improve their market penetration, deliver service excellence and increase their profitability. Individuals wishing to contribute materials may send them Kathleen@HospitalityEducators.com. Special pricing is in effect for a limited time that also includes a complimentary copy of LESSONS FROM THE FIELD- A COMMON SENSE APPROACH TO EFFECTIVE HOTEL SALES.

If you need assistance or simply an independent review or opinion on a hospitality challenge, contact me directly for a prompt response and very personalized attention.

www.HoganHospitality.com : Your Hospitality Resource for the Hotel Owner, Innkeeper, Manager and Hospitality Industry Associations

http://www.linkedin.com/in/drjohnhoganchache

CONTACT      Dr. John Hogan, CHE CHA CMHS

United States – Phoenix, Phone: 602-799-5375

www.hoganhospitality.com/ Email: info@hoganhospitality.com

“Questions I Wish You Would Ask Me™| Abed Mishtawy, a multi-faceted food service professional

“Questions I Wish You Would Ask Me™” includes interviews such as those found in our HOSPITALITY CONVERSATIONS,  and and it also allows industry professional the opportunity to share their perspectives, values and opinions on additional areas and subjects that may not have been part of the planned discussion.  This segment includes a wide range of hospitality professionals from all portions of the industry, with participants answering at least five of the listed nine questions.  Their responses will interest, sometimes amuse and definitely inspire you to consider how YOU might answer.

  This response comes from Abed Mishtawy, a multi-faceted food service professional. Currently in the Tampa, St. Petersburg Florida area, Abed has spent the last tweny plus years in a variety of management and senior partnership roles with several companies, most notably as District Manager at Checkers Drive in Restaurants, as Director of Operations at Ponderosa Steak and Buffet Franchise Company and as Franchise Business Consultant at Ponderosa Steakhouses Metromedia

  • What is your favorite charity or cause?                                                                           The Red Cross, they are always there…
  • Name your pet service peeve, why and any ideas you may have to address it. 

When I ask: “What is good on the menu?” and the server answers “everything”

  •  Who was the most important mentor in your life and why? In the last five years, what has been your memorable

David Evans , Senior VP of Human Resource at Mattress Giant. When facing a tough question, he is my moral compass and gets me to answer my own questions

  • In the last five years, what has been your most memorable meeting or convention experience and why?  

Our convention in Vegas at the Paris. The Agenda was not jam packed, we had a chance to mingle and meet other participants

  • What is the one piece of advice you would offer to a graduating student with a hospitality degree?

Regardless to where you are, Check your EGO at the door. Ego has no place in hospitality

  • What is the one question do you wish someone would ask you in an interview today?

What does the word balance mean to you? And how do you achieve it ?” And, What do you value the most in life and why?

____________________________________

We have asked dozens of people involved in hospitality businesses around the world to answer up to nine questions in this special section of HospitalityEducators.com.  If you would like to participate, please contact   John.Hogan@HospitalityEducators.com 

 Feel free to share an idea for a column at info@hoganhospitality.com anytime or contact me regarding consulting, customized workshops, speaking engagements … And remember – we all need a regular dose of common sense.

Dr. John Hogan, Crowne Plaza Chicago, MeetingsQuest Oct 2010

John Hogan is a successful hospitality executive, educator, author and consultant and is a frequent keynote speaker and seminar leader at many hospitality industry events.  He is Co-Founder of a consortium (www.HospitalityEducators.com) of successful corporate and academic professionals delivering focused and affordable counsel in solving specific challenges facing hospitality today. www.HospitalityEducators.com is a membership site offering a wide range of information, forms, best practices and ideas designed to help individual hoteliers and hospitality businesses improve their market penetration, deliver service excellence and increase their profitability. Individuals wishing to contribute materials may send them Kathleen@HospitalityEducators.com. Special pricing is in effect for a limited time that also includes a complimentary copy of LESSONS FROM THE FIELD- A COMMON SENSE APPROACH TO EFFECTIVE HOTEL SALES.

Dr. John Hogan, CHE CHA CMHS          United States – Phoenix, Az

Phone: 602-799-5375

www.hoganhospitality.com/ Email: info@hoganhospitality.com.

PREVIEW of RENEGADE MARKETING FOR THE HOSPITALITY INDUSTRY

PREVIEW

RENEGADE MARKETING

FOR THE HOSPITALITY INDUSTRY

A COLLECTION

OF PRACTICAL IDEAS

AND SOLUTIONS

 by

John J. Hogan

This is in the final review stages and will be offered in

  1. an interactive workshop
  2. hopefully an online webinar @ www.HospitalityEducators.com
  3. and in eBook form

Please feel free to ask any questions now or send me a note if there are other topics you would like to have addressed.

RENEGADE MARKETING FOR THE HOSPITALITY INDUSTRY:

Part One : Understanding the Basics!

 A COLLECTION OF PRACTICAL IDEAS AND SOLUTIONS FOR THE HOSPITALITY INDUSTRY : RENEGADE MARKETING IN ACTION !

 Definitions of the word RENEGADE include:

Nonconformist , independent, self-reliant, individualist and more

Renegade Marketing in the ever-changing world of hospitality means understanding the values and past successes of existing programs, while at the same time reaching out and dealing with the current trends of customer preferences and needs.

In today’s expensive advertising market, most of us cannot afford to waste our marketing dollars or time. This program focuses on ways that properties and hospitality businesses of all sizes can extend their effectiveness in ways that are unique, innovative and fun to implement.

The World of Hospitality

  • A. Lodging
  • B. Food and Beverage Services
  • C. Transportation Services
  • D. Retail
  • E. Entertainment venues
  • F. Activities, events

Understanding Sales and Marketing in the Hospitality Industry

A. Sales is primarily a series of efforts to sell the property or business services by direct personal contact, telephone and mailings.

It emphasizes direct contact and deskwork to sell primarily to the end user (the consumer) directly, but also can include intermediate agencies such as travel agents, tour companies, wholesalers, etc.

__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

B. Marketing is the selection of desired (and attainable) target markets and enticing the market to use the property’s services. It includes research, direct sales, and strategies to meet the needs of the market, advertising, publicity,

Please feel free to ask any questions now or send me a note if there are other topics you would like to have addressed.

 All rights reserved – John Hogan, CHA CHE CMHS PhD

A Reminder from HospitalityEducators.com|New Requirements For Claiming Tip Credit in USA

A Reminder from HospitalityEducators.com:

New Requirements For Claiming Tip Credit in USA
Tipped Employees Under the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA)

Under a U.S. Department of Labor rule, which went into effect May 5, 2011, employers must comply with specific procedures if they seek to claim a tip credit for wages paid to employees who receive tips in addition to a cash wage.

How it Works
Every employee for whom a tip credit is applied as part of his or her wages, must be notified of the following:

  • The cash wage being paid to him/her, which must be at least $2.13 an hour (or higher depending on state law)
  • The tip credit amount, which may not be greater than the difference between the minimum wage and the cash wage or the actual amount of tips received by the employee up to $5.12 per hour (or less depending on state law)
  •  All tips must be retained by the employee, except in the case of a valid tip-pooling arrangement
  • The credit will not apply to any employee who has not been informed of this information

Although the rule states that employers do not necessarily need to provide this information in writing, it strongly advises employers to do so in case they are called upon to prove they have complied.

Questions? The Department of Labor has produced a fact sheet on the new rules.

U.S. Department of Labor
Fact Sheet #15: Tipped Employees Under the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA)

This fact sheet provides general information concerning the application of the FLSA to employees who receive tips.Wage and Hour Division http://www.dol.gov/whd/regs/compliance/whdfs15.pdf (Revised March 2011)

Characteristics

Tipped employees are those who customarily and regularly receive more than $30 per month in tips. Tips are the property of the employee. The employer is prohibited from using an employee’s tips for any reason other than as a credit against its minimum wage obligation to the employee (“tip credit”) or in furtherance of a valid tip pool. Only tips actually received by the employee may be counted in determining whether the employee is a tipped employee and in applying the tip credit.

Tip Credit : Section 3(m) of the FLSA permits an employer to take a tip credit toward its minimum wage obligation for tipped employees equal to the difference between the required cash wage (which must be at least $2.13) and the federal minimum wage. Thus, the maximum tip credit that an employer can currently claim under the FLSA is $5.12 per hour (the minimum wage of $7.25 minus the minimum required cash wage of $2.13).

Tip Pool : The requirement that an employee must retain all tips does not preclude a valid tip pooling or sharing arrangement among employees who customarily and regularly receive tips, such as waiters, waitresses, bellhops, counter personnel (who serve customers), bussers, and service bartenders. A valid tip pool may not include employees who do not customarily and regularly received tips, such as dishwashers, cooks, chefs, and janitors.

Requirements

The employer must provide the following information to a tipped employee before the employer may use the tip credit:

1) the amount of cash wage the employer is paying a tipped employee, which must be at least $2.13 per hour;

2) the additional amount claimed by the employer as a tip credit, which cannot exceed $5.12 (the difference between the minimum required cash wage of $2.13 and the current minimum wage of $7.25);

3) that the tip credit claimed by the employer cannot exceed the amount of tips actually received by the tipped employee;

4) that all tips received by the tipped employee are to be retained by the employee except for a valid tip pooling arrangement limited to employees who customarily and regularly receive tips; and

  1. that the tip credit will not apply to any tipped employee unless the employee has been informed of these tip credit provisions. The employer may provide oral or written notice to its tipped employees informing them of items 1-5 above. An employer who fails to provide the required information cannot use the tip credit provisions and therefore must pay the tipped employee at least $7.25 per hour in wages and allow the tipped employee to keep all tips received.

Employers electing to use the tip credit provision must be able to show that tipped employees receive at least the minimum wage when direct (or cash) wages and the tip credit amount are combined. If an employee’s tips combined with the employer’s direct (or cash) wages of at least $2.13 per hour do not equal the minimum hourly wage of $7.25 per hour, the employer must make up the difference.

Retention of Tips : A tip is the sole property of the tipped employee regardless of whether the employer takes a tip credit. The FLSA prohibits any arrangement between the employer and the tipped employee whereby any part of the tip received becomes the property of the employer. For example, even where a tipped employee receives at least $7.25 per hour in wages directly from the employer, the employee may not be required to turn over his or her tips to the employer.

Tip Pooling : As noted above, the requirement that an employee must retain all tips does not preclude a valid tip pooling or sharing arrangement among employees who customarily and regularly receive tips. The FLSA does not impose a maximum contribution amount or percentage on valid mandatory tip pools. The employer, however, must notify tipped employees of any required tip pool contribution amount, may only take a tip credit for the amount of tips each tipped employee ultimately receives, and may not retain any of the employees’ tips for any other purpose.

Dual Jobs : When an employee is employed by one employer in both a tipped and a non-tipped occupation, such as an employee employed both as a maintenance person and a waitperson, the tip credit is available only for the hours spent by the employee in the tipped occupation. The FLSA permits an employer to take the tip credit for some time that the tipped employee spends in duties related to the tipped occupation, even though such duties are not by themselves directed toward producing tips. For example, a waitperson who spends some time cleaning and setting tables, making coffee, and occasionally washing dishes or glasses is considered to be engaged in a tipped occupation even though these duties are not tip producing. However, where a tipped employee spends a substantial amount of time (in excess of 20 percent in the workweek) performing related duties, no tip credit may be taken for the time spent in such duties. .

Service Charges : A compulsory charge for service, for example, 15 percent of the bill, is not a tip. Such charges are part of the employer’s gross receipts. Sums distributed to employees from service charges cannot be counted as tips received, but may be used to satisfy the employer’s minimum wage and overtime obligations under the FLSA. If an employee receives tips in addition to the compulsory service charge, those tips may be considered in determining whether the employee is a tipped employee and in the application of the tip credit.

Credit Cards : Where tips are charged on a credit card and the employer must pay the credit card company a percentage on each sale, the employer may pay the employee the tip, less that percentage. For example, where a credit card company charges an employer 3 percent on all sales charged to its credit service, the employer may pay the tipped employee 97 percent of the tips without violating the FLSA. However, this charge on the tip may not reduce the employee’s wage below the required minimum wage. The amount due the employee must be paid no later than the regular pay day and may not be held while the employer is awaiting reimbursement from the credit card company.

Youth Minimum Wage : The 1996 Amendments to the FLSA allow employers to pay a youth minimum wage of not less than $4.25 per hour to employees who are under 20 years of age during the first 90 consecutive calendar days after initial employment by their employer. The law contains certain protections for employees that prohibit employers from displacing any employee in order to hire someone at the youth minimum wage.

Typical Problems

Minimum Wage Problems :

  1. Where an employee does not receive sufficient tips to make up the difference between the direct (or cash) wage payment (which must be at least $2.13 per hour) and the minimum wage, the employer must make up the difference.
  2. Where an employee receives tips only and is paid no cash wage, the full minimum wage is owed.
  3. Where deductions for walk-outs, breakage, or cash register shortages reduce the employee’s wages below the minimum wage, such deductions are illegal. Where a tipped employee is paid $2.13 per hour in direct (or cash) wages and the employer claims the maximum tip credit of $5.12 per hour, no such deductions can be made without reducing the employee below the minimum wage (even where the employee receives more than $5.12 per hour in tips).
  4. Where a tipped employee is required to contribute to a tip pool that includes employees who do not customarily and regularly receive tips, the employee is owed all tips he or she contributed to the pool and the full $7.25 minimum wage.

Overtime Problems :

  1. Where the employer takes the tip credit, overtime is calculated on the full minimum wage, not the lower direct (or cash) wage payment. The employer may not take a larger tip credit for an overtime hour than for a straight time hour (i.e., $4.00 tip credit per hour for the nonovertime hours and $5.12 tip credit per hour for overtime hours).
  2.  Where overtime is not paid based on the regular rate including all service charges, commissions, bonuses, and other remuneration.

Where to Obtain Additional Information

For additional information, visit the Wage and Hour Division Website: http://www.wagehour.dol.gov and/or call our toll-free information and helpline, available 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. in your time zone, 1-866­4USWAGE (1-866-487-9243).

This publication is for general information and is not to be considered in the same light as official statements of position contained in e regulations.

U.S. Department of Labor      Frances Perkins Building 200 Constitution Avenue, NW Washington, DC 202101-866-4-USWAGE             TTY: 1-866-487-9243

State Laws

Employers must also comply with state laws that apply to tipped employees in addition to federal laws. Wages for tipped employees in specific states can be found here.

_______________________________________________________________________

KEYS TO SUCCESS is the umbrella title for our 2011 programs, hospitality services and columns. This year’s writings focus on a variety of topics for hotel owners, managers and professionals including both my “HOW TO” articles, HOSPITALITY CONVERSATIONS™, Lessons from the Field™, Hotel Common Sense™ and Principles for Success     Feel free to share an idea for a column at john.hogan@hospitalityeducators.com anytime or contact me regarding consulting, customized workshops, speaking engagements … And remember – we all need a regular dose of common sense.

John Hogan is a successful hospitality executive, educator, author and consultant and is a frequent keynote speaker and seminar leader at many hospitality industry events. He is Co-Founder of a consortium (www.HospitalityEducators.com) of successful corporate and academic professionals delivering focused and affordable counsel in solving specific challenges facing hospitality today.

www.HospitalityEducators.com is a membership site offering a wide range of information, forms, best practices and ideas designed to help individual hoteliers and hospitality businesses improve their market penetration, deliver service excellence and increase their profitability. Individuals wishing to contribute materials may send them Kathleen@HospitalityEducators.com. Special pricing is in effect for a limited time that also includes a complimentary copy of LESSONS FROM THE FIELD- A COMMON SENSE APPROACH TO EFFECTIVE HOTEL SALES.

If you need assistance or simply an independent review or opinion on a hospitality challenge, contact me directly for a prompt response and very personalized attention.

www.HoganHospitality.com : Your Hospitality Resource for the Hotel Owner, Innkeeper, Manager and Hospitality Industry Associations

http://www.linkedin.com/in/drjohnhoganchache

CONTACT      Dr. John Hogan, CHE CHA CMHS

United States – Phoenix, Phone: 602-799-5375

www.hoganhospitality.com/ Email: info@hoganhospitality.com

What’s the Problem™? Staff that feels overlooked or taken for granted in today’s Hospitality Work Environment

What’s the Problem™?

Staff that feels overlooked or taken for granted in today’s Hospitality Work Environment.

In this short clip, Dr. Tony Alessandra shares his insights on the contrasts between Mentors and Role Models.  We encourage our readers and members to take the time to reflect on the people who were their role models and mentors.

See the  The Solution Is™ at HospitalityEducators.com for specific answers to this problem

We at HospitalityEducators.com can assist you with creating an environment that cultivates positive situations in hotels and hospitality businesses.
Contact John.Hogan@HospitalityEducators.com or call 602-799-5375.
                        

Here is a link to a column reflecting on some memories of one of the co-founders of our site.
http://www.hospitalityeducators.com/articles/20110318_6

KEYS TO SUCCESS is the umbrella title for our 2011 programs, hospitality services and columns. This year’s writings focus on a variety of topics for hotel owners, managers and professionalsincluding both my “HOW TO” articles, HOSPITALITY CONVERSATIONS™, Lessons from the Field™, Hotel Common Sense™ and Principles for Success

 

Dr. John Hogan, Minneapolis Marriott, “A Career Hotelier’s Insights on Optimizing Meeting Success”

 Feel free to share an idea for a column at john.hogan@hospitalityeducators.com anytime or contact me regarding consulting, customized workshops, speaking engagements … And remember – we all need a regular dose of common sense.

John Hogan is a successful hospitality executive, educator, author and consultant and is a frequent keynote speaker and seminar leader at many hospitality industry events. He is Co-Founder of a consortium (www.HospitalityEducators.com) of successful corporate and academic professionals delivering focused and affordable counsel in solving specific challenges facing hospitality today.

www.HospitalityEducators.com is a membership site offering a wide range of information, forms, best practices and ideas designed to help individual hoteliers and hospitality businesses improve their market penetration, deliver service excellence and increase their profitability. Individuals wishing to contribute materials may send them Kathleen@HospitalityEducators.com. Special pricing is in effect for a limited time that also includes a complimentary copy of LESSONS FROM THE FIELD- A COMMON SENSE APPROACH TO EFFECTIVE HOTEL SALES.

Consulting Expertise and Research Interest

  1. Professional Development for the Organization and the Individual
  2. Customer Service
  3. Making Cultural Diversity Real
  4. Developing Academic Hospitality programs
  5. Medical Lodging Consulting
  6. Sales Management and training
  7. Turn-around and revenue management

If you need assistance in any of these areas or simply an independent review or opinion on a hospitality challenge, contact me directly for a prompt response and very personalized attention.

www.HoganHospitality.com

Your Hospitality Resource for the Hotel Owner, Innkeeper, Manager and Hospitality Industry Associations

http://www.linkedin.com/in/drjohnhoganchache

CONTACT      Dr. John Hogan, CHE CHA CMHS

United States – Phoenix, Phone: 602-799-5375

www.hoganhospitality.com/ Email: info@hoganhospitality.com