Hotel Common Sense – 7 Practical Steps on MBWA

Hotel Common Sense – 7 Practical Steps on MBWA

HOSPITALITY PRINCIPLES OF  SUCCESS

A previous article used one of Tom Peters and Robert Waterman’s fundamentals from their groundbreaking book on changing the ways we do business.   IN SEARCH OF EXCELLENCE introduced a formal name for what the more successful hospitality managers already knew about motivating their staff. The phrase “Management by Walking Around” was based on Hewlett-Packard’s commitment to their staff with interaction – not micromanagement, but ongoing listening and responding to staff ideas.

Hotel Common Sense – Philosophy #2 , Or, why the Open Door policy no longer works… article outlined how today’s workforce wants and needs to be considered as individuals who can contribute to the success of their organization.

Reader feedback showed the growing awareness to that need for additional management and leadership “active listening” and this follow-up message on MBWA offers some concrete ways to notch up that effort of positive involvement.

  1. Allow your staff to share complete stories and messages.  Many hospitality companies are trying to improve their customer care programs, yet how often do leaders and managers actually ask an hourly staff member to share a story about either an unhappy or very satisfied guest?  Listening to the entire story could provide best practices that might be substantially more effective and less expensive than hiring a consultant.
  2. Avoid the tendency to interrupt.   General Managers are results oriented people who are looking for the bottom line.   I know from personal experience the tendency to “hurry” people along is there, but allowing people to share the entire experience will encourage them to be more open.
  3. Remember eye contact in conversations.  One of my first mentors taught me a great deal about hospitality, but his habit of looking over my shoulder when we were talking always made me feel I was missing something. Give confidence to people with your eyes.
  4. Collect and communicate these stories of success (and failures). Sharing these stories (appropriately) at meetings of all staff, at training sessions, in newsletters and more provides an incentive to people to want to contribute because they have learned that you really do care.  I have seen some outstanding examples of “you tube” like testimonials from a number of hospitality companies of all sizes.
  5. Remember this is not a game of “one-up.” As General Managers, we have likely been in the business longer or heard more stories and it is important to recognize that we should not try to offer one “better” story than the one we are hearing. Remember, MBWA is about “active listening.”
  6. Credit the source.   When we add a new resource, form or best practice to our hospitality membership site, we obtain permission first and then always make certain we credit them fully.  Each of us has unique approaches, messages and talents and sharing the credit with our associates and guests is essential to moving forward.
  7. Build trust by honestly listening.  Some (correction, many) of the best suggestions I have ever heard as a manager or executive came from the people who are performing the job.  I learned more about laundry sorting, washing pots and up-selling from people who were proud to be successful at what they were doing.  Some of those suggestions needed clarification and some were not told as quickly as I might have preferred, but building teams means using all the team members’ strengths.

I normally update the Hospitality Tip of the Week, but as this is an immediate follow-up message, I am going to maintain it, as I believe the point needs to repeated until it becomes a habit.

Keys to Success Hospitality Tip of the Week:   Focus on MBWA

A challenge to every manager who is responsible for 5 or more people:  measure your in and out of the office time and at the end of the week, see how much time you spent ACTIVELY INTERACTING with your team.

The goal is 70% of your time out of the office – how did you do?   

              What will you do next week?

KEYS TO SUCCESS is the umbrella title for my speaking programs, hospitality services and columns. This year’s writings will focus on a wide variety of topics for hotel owners, managers and professionals including both my “HOW TO” articles and HOSPITALITY CONVERSATIONS. My segments Lessons from the Field, Hotel Common Sense and Principles for Success will be featured at appropriate times in the year as well.

Success does not come by accident or chance.

Contact us for assistance.

Hospitality.jpg

Kathleen Hogan Ireland Sept 2013John J. Hogan CHA CHE CHO and Kathleen Hogan  MBA CHO are the  co-founders of  HospitalityEducators.com, which was created in 2010 to be a resource for hotel owners and professionals as they sought to improve market share, occupancy, operational efficiency and profitability.

The husband and wife team are transitioning the original membership site concept and evolving the business model today to a focused resource offering consulting, training, and individualized support to both hospitality and other service businesses.   Services include keynote addresses workshops, online support, metrics measurement, marketing and customer service from a group of more than a dozen experienced professionals.   While continuing to serve hospitality, the demand for these types of services is growing and can be personalized.

John Hogan is also the principal of HoganHospitality.com, which provides a range of expert professional services for hotel owners, including professional development for organizations, training, consulting and expert witness services.

John Hogan Sept 2013DSCN0215

Contact information:  Kathleen Hogan  480-436-0283,

John Hogan

602-799-5375 or service@hospitalityeducators.com

Workshops Available include: 

From the Chalkboard to the Front Line

What They Don’t Teach You at Hotel School

Focus:

  • Hotel Profitability
  • Hotel Sales
  • Marketing Ideas
  • Hotel Operations

There will always be an ongoing debate on the comparative merits of experience versus the knowledge acquired in formal educational settings.   The best lessons anyone can learn from hotel schools include an awareness of what really occurs on the front line in the actual hospitality setting.  This keynote transitions the academic message to the real world of running a profitable hospitality business.

Click    here   for Keynotes and Workshops Available 

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Lessons in Leadership

Lessons in Leadership – By  John J.  Hogan CHA CHMS CHE  CHO

This title is not specifically referring to one company, one brand or one country in the title.

For the past five to seven years, even in a tight economy,  leading developers have been targeting previously under-served countries and the pace has hastened this past 24-36 months. (See this link for specifics)

For this lessons in leadership, I looked to the East for a different perspective and different industry.  While hospitality is not the same as manufacturing, there are parallels in certain people skills.

A former senior managing director of Toyota Motor Corporation and renowned leader of their famous manufacturing system, Masao Nemoto is known throughout the world as a leader in quality control and process optimization. In a sense, he is one of the principal architects of the “Toyota Way.”    His ideas on leadership and quality management are documented, and reveal the profound knowledge Nemoto infused into the day-to-day operations at Toyota, much the same as certain hoteliers such as Statler, Hilton, Wilson,  Johnson, Marriott, Oberoi, Sharp, Carlson, Kerzner, Forte, Ritz and others did in hotels.

Nemoto insisted on a culture of shared responsibility and he believed that critical tasks could not be left to a single business unit, but rather should be a collective responsibility. Nemoto’s point of view says that leaders must lead across the company, not just their own particular area

His beliefs went from the senior leaders all the down to the individual worker on the assembly line, where everyone speaks, insisted Nemoto, not just management. A direct result of this view is the work principle: problems must be solved at the lowest possible level. All employees take responsibility for problem solving, instead of pushing the problems or issues up the line where it likely gets choked in bureaucracy.

In my career, I have worked with and in all sizes of organizations.   I have sat in countless meetings that seem to be stalled with some regularity and have found myself wondering the same things you might be thinking today:  “Are we competing against each other or against the competition?”

Nemoto’s 10 leadership principles:

  1. Improvement after improvement. Managers should look continually for ways to improve the work of their employees. Advance is a gradual, incremental process. They should create all atmosphere conducive to improvements by others.
  2. Coordinate between divisions.Managers of individual divisions, departments, or subsidiaries must share responsibility.  A corollary of this is that upper management should not assign important tasks to only one division.
  3. Everyone speaks.This rule guides supervisors of quality circles at Toyota, ensuring participation and learning by all members. It has also been generalized to all meetings and the annual planning process. By hearing everyone’s view, upper management can create realistic plans that have the support of those who must implement them–an essential element in quality programs.
  4. Do not scold.This was an alien concept to most managers. At Toyota the policy is for superiors to avoid giving criticism and threatening punitive measures when mistakes are made. This is the only way to ensure that mistakes will be reported immediately and fully so that the root causes (in policies and processes) can be identified and amended. Assigning blame to the reporter clearly discourages reporting of mistakes and makes it harder to find the underlying cause of a mistake, but it is difficult to train managers to take this approach.
  5. Make sure others understand your work.An emphasis on teaching and presentation skills is important because of the need for collaboration. At Toyota, managers are expected to develop their presentation skills and to teach associates about their work so that collaborations will be fuller and more effective.
  6. Send the best employees out for rotation. Toyota has a rotation policy to
    train employees. There is a strong tendency for managers to keep their best employees from rotation, but the company benefits most in the long run by training its best employees.
  7. A command without a deadline is not a command. This rule is used to
    ensure that managers always give a deadline or schedule for work. Employees are instructed to ignore requests that are not accompanied by a deadline. The rationale is that without a deadline, tasks are far less likely to be completed.
  8. Rehearsal is an ideal occasion for training.Managers and supervisors give numerous presentations and reports. In a QC program there are frequent progress reports. Nemoto encouraged managers to focus on the rehearsal of reports and presentations, and to require that they be rehearsed. Rehearsal time is used to teach presentation skills and to explore problems or lack of understanding of the topic. Because it is informal, rehearsal time is better for learning.
  9. Inspection is a failure unless top management takes action.The idea
    behind this is that management must prescribe specific remedies whenever a problem is observed or reported. Delegating this task (with comments like “shape up” or “do your best to solve this problem”) is ineffective. So is failing to take any action once a problem is defined.
  10. Ask subordinates, “What can I do for you?”At Toyota this is called “creating an opportunity to be heard at the top.” In the first year of a quality-control program, managers hold meetings in which employees brief them about progress. Three rules guide these informal meetings:
  • Do not postpone the meetings or subordinates will think their project is not taken seriously.
  • Listen to the process, not just the results, since QCs focus in on the process.
  • Ask the presenters whether you can do anything for them. If they ask for help, be sure to act on the request.

If top management is perceived as willing to help with problems, employees are more optimistic about tackling the problems and will take management’s goals more seriously.

KEYS TO SUCCESS is the umbrella title for our programs, hospitality services and columns. This year’s writings focus o- a variety of topics for hotel owners, managers and professionals including both my “HOW TO” articles, HOSPITALITY CONVERSATIONS™, Lessons from the Field™, Hotel Common- Sense™ and Principles for Success

Hospitality Tip of the Week™

Focus on Continuous Improvement”

“Improvement after improvement, that has been my guiding principle in my more than three decades of service with Toyota Motors and its affiliates.”                    
Masao Nemoto, Former Managing Director, Toyota Motor Corporation

HE logoSuccess does not come by accident or chance.

Contact us for assistance.

John J. Hogan CHA CHE CHO and Kathleen Hogan  MBA CHO are the  co-founders of  HospitalityEducators.com, which was created in 2010 to be a resource for hotel owners and professionals as they sought to improve market share, occupancy, operational efficiency and profitability.

AAEAAQAAAAAAAAL2AAAAJDA0N2IzNDgzLTZkMWEtNGIwZC1hNGZlLWY5ZDgwZDAyNjdhMw  AAEAAQAAAAAAAAInAAAAJDMwNmJlN2UxLTQyYzktNDdjNC05MmRkLTc0ZjQ1ODU0NDRmZA The husband and wife team are transitioning the original membership site concept and evolving the business model today to a focused resource offering consulting, training, and individualized support to both hospitality and other service businesses.   Services include keynote addresses workshops, online support, metrics measurement, marketing and customer service from a group of more than a dozen experienced professionals.   While continuing to serve hospitality, the demand for these types of services is growing and can be personalized.

John Hogan is also the principal of HoganHospitality.com, which provides a range of expert professional services for hotel owners, including professional development for organizations, training, consulting and expert witness services.

Contact information:  Kathleen Hogan  480-436-0283,

John Hogan 602-799-5375 or service@hospitalityeducators.com

 Click    here   for Keynotes and Workshops Available 

What does it mean to “do right” ? Ask Mark Twain


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What does it mean to “do right” ?

Mark Twain was the Will Rogers or Jon Stewart of his time.  He was both witty and sarcastic in much of his writing, yet he almost always made one smile.

This framed quote by Twain was one of two personal items kept on the desk of Harry S. Truman, the 33rd US President.  Truman, we recall, had never sought the office and he was pressured into accepting the Vice President spot in 1944.   Unlike today when literally dozens of candidates work for years to even gain a nomination, Truman became an unintentional President.

If you were to read David McCullough’s Pulitzer winning book called simply TRUMAN, you would see that this individual had to deal with literally dozens of issues of the times. Segregation, McCarthyism, the Iron Curtain, the war in Korea, the recognition of Israel, the approval of the United Nations and much more were just some of the controversies he faced. Congress was just as disruptive or partisan as today, or perhaps even more so.

Truman’s approval rating when he left office was near the lowest recorded, yet 50 years later, he is now acknowledged as one of the greatest Presidents. (see footnotes)

What does it mean to “do right” to you? 

In business or politics, there is usually an instinct that is founded on values.  Many of us tend to mistrust politicians, as too many of them have proven to be self serving.

Do the business practices of some airlines seem as ethical as others?    Why have so many of them been forced into bankruptcy when others prosper?

Do the business practices of some retailers, hotel companies, phone or cable companies meet the Twain quote?   You must decide on them, as well as for our own businesses.

Truman may or may not have been appreciated in his career, but his legacy remains intact and actually stronger.

How do we want to be remembered? What are we doing about it to make that happen?

 

John J Hogan CHA CMHS CHE CHO

HospitalityEducators.com
Hogan Hospitality  

Success does not come by accident or chance.

Contact us for assistance.


John J. Hogan CHA CHE CHO and Kathleen Hogan  MBA CHO are the  co-founders of  HospitalityEducators.com, which was created in 2010 to be a resource for hotel owners and professionals as they sought to improve market share, occupancy, operational efficiency and profitability.

The husband and wife team are transitioning the original membership site concept and evolving the business model today to a focused resource offering consulting, training, and individualized support to both hospitality and other service businesses.   Services include keynote addresses workshops, online support, metrics measurement, marketing and customer service from a group of more than a dozen experienced professionals.   While continuing to serve hospitality, the demand for these types of services is growing and can be personalized.

John Hogan is also the principal of HoganHospitality.com, which provides a range of expert professional services for hotel owners, including professional development for organizations, training, consulting and expert witness services.

Contact information:  Kathleen Hogan  480-436-0283,

John Hogan 602-799-5375 or service@hospitalityeducators.com

Workshops Available include: 

From the Chalkboard to the Front Line

What They Don’t Teach You at Hotel School

Focus:

  • Hotel Profitability
  • Hotel Sales
  • Marketing Ideas
  • Hotel Operations

There will always be an ongoing debate on the comparative merits of experience versus the knowledge acquired in formal educational settings.   The best lessons anyone can learn from hotel schools include an awareness of what really occurs on the front line in the actual hospitality setting.  This keynote transitions the academic message to the real world of running a profitable hospitality business.

 Click    here   for Keynotes and Workshops Available 

 

footnotes

Great Motivational Quotes | Thoughts from HospitalityEducators.com

There are times when we all need to take a moment to step back, catch our breath and “listen” to the words of others who can inspire or motivate us.

Here are ten quotes that will take less than ninety seconds to read.

Listen. Read. Think. Pause.

____________________________________________

Success does not come by accident or chance.

Contact us for assistance

John.Hogan@HospitalityEducators.com or 602-799-5375

www.HospitalityEducators.com  was created to help hospitality businesses address problems via a training and information resource site to help you increase your Hotel’s revenue, market share and profitability.

KEYS TO SUCCESSis the umbrella title for my 2015 programs, hospitality services and columns. This year’s writings focus on a variety of topics for hotel owners, managers and professionalsincluding both my “HOW TO” articles, HOSPITALITY CONVERSATIONS™, Lessons from the Field™,Hotel Common Sense™ , THE P-A-R PRINCIPLE and Principles for Success.

Feel free to share an idea for a column at john.hogan@hospitalityeducators.com anytime or contact me regarding consulting, customized workshops, speaking engagements … And remember – we all need a regular dose of common sense.

Oct 2010 Dr. John Hogan CHA CHE  027

John Hogan, Certified Hospitality Educator (CHE), Certified Hotel Administrator (CHA), Certified Master Hotel Supplier (CMHS), Certified Hotel Owner  (CHO),

John Hogan is a successful hospitality executive, educator, author and consultant and is a frequent keynote speaker and seminar leader at many hospitality industry events. He is Co-Founder of www.HospitalityEducators.com , which delivers focused and affordable counsel in solving specific challenges facing hospitality today.

Consulting Expertise and Research Interest

  1. Developing Academic Hospitality programs
  2. Medical Lodging Consulting
  3. Sales Management and training
  4. Turn-around and revenue management
  5. Professional Development for the Organization and the Individual
  6. Customer Service
  7. Making Cultural Diversity Real

If you need assistance in any of these areas or simply an independent review or opinion on a hospitality challenge, contact me directly for a prompt response and very personalized attention.

www.HospitalityEducators.com is a membership site offering a wide range of information, forms, best practices and ideas designed to help individual hoteliers and hospitality businesses improve their market penetration, deliver service excellence and increase their profitability.

www.HoganHospitality.com

Expert Professional Services for the Hotel Owner, Innkeeper, Manager and Hospitality Industry Associations

CONTACT

John Hogan, CHE CHA CMHS CHO

United States – Phoenix, Phone: 602-799-5375

www.hoganhospitality.com / Email: john@hoganhospitality.com

http://www.linkedin.com/in/drjohnhoganchache

Identity: Your Passport to Success | Recommended Reading from HospitalityEducators.com

Identity: Your Passport to Success …

Identity

 

It cannot be easy to find a novel way to write yet another book on self-branding of the individual, but I find that Stedman Graham has found his unique approaches and messages on ways to develop the success to be found in each of us.

With a foreword by John Maxwell and an afterword by Stephen Covey, one has reason to believe that the content between the two has substance and Graham hits the mark.

Using his Nine-Step Success Process, Graham uses interesting and believable examples of his own life on he addressed stereotype cause and effect situations.  He offers discussion and reason for thought on how we develop values as the base and center of our identity, as we feel it should be, not as others say it should be.

There are Questions to Consider at the end of chapters, and nuggets of inspiration in shaded boxes throughout.

I find Stedman Graham to be an excellent and precise writer – he gets to the point of his message clearly and with just enough background.

I also consider him to be a strong believer in what seems to be on the verge of extinction – the quality and competency of “thinking.”  He offers the proposition that we need to challenge the premise of traditional learning, where we learn to be a worker who finds a job and completes the assigned work. His dramatic point is the observation that so many of us program ourselves (or allow up others to program us) to do the same thing over and over and over again.  Is it any wonder that so many people change jobs?  Do we really all want to do and accomplish the absolute minimum to get by?

Graham’s nine steps start with the premise of the book title – identity.  He states it is essential to be honest with one’s self and he includes inspirational stories by a number of well-known names who hit the mark in their journeys and give us reason to think more about ours.

Graham makes the point that we really only have ourselves to blame if we miss the real hidden identity, resources and purpose that we all have hidden under the surface

Read this short book – find your true identity.

 John J. Hogan     CHA CHMS CHE CHO

Hospitality Educators                      Hogan Hospitality

Hospitality.jpg

Kathleen and John Hogan    #2    DSCN0412John J. Hogan CHA CMHS CHE CHO and Kathleen Hogan MBA CHO are the co-founders of  HospitalityEducators.com, which was created in 2010 to be a resource for hotel owners and professionals as they sought to improve market share, occupancy, operational efficiency and profitability.

The husband and wife team are transitioning the original membership site concept and evolving the business model today to a focused resource offering consulting, training, and individualized support to both hospitality and other service businesses.   Services include keynote addresses workshops, online support, metrics measurement, marketing and customer service from a group of more than a dozen experienced professionals.   While continuing to serve hospitality, the demand for these types of services is growing and can be personalized.

John Hogan is also the principal of HoganHospitality.com, which provides a range of expert professional services for hotel owners, including professional development for organizations, training, consulting and expert witness services.

Contact information:  Kathleen Hogan  480-436-0283, John Hogan 602-799-5375 or  service@hospitalityeducators.com

Keynotes: 

Workshops Available: 

Recommended Reference from HospitalityEducators.com | Employment Law- An Essential HR Desk Resource

Nolo HRAn Excellent Quick Reference

This is the first NOLO resource I have seen and overall it is easy to read and follow.

The book itself is 357 pages and its A to Z reference style makes it easy to go directly to the topic you are looking for – IF you know the precise term. For example, if you are looking for “At Will” employment details, it is under E in the Employment Contract section, not A.

The other suggestion I would make on updates would be to include an index so the terms can be found a bit easier.

That being noted, the book itself does carry solid information on many issues that smaller companies may not be familiar with and can be used by any size organization for reference.

As always, a legal disclaimer is included here: we should all seek specific qualified resources before making final decisions.

 

With that said, this is recommended as a solid reference!

John Hogan  CHA CHMS CHE CHO
Hospitality Educators
Hogan Hospitality

 

John Hogan       Kathleen Hogan

Hospitality.jpg

Kathleen Hogan Ireland Sept 2013John Hogan Sept 2013DSCN0215Dr. John Hogan CHA CMHS CHE CHO and Kathleen Hogan MBA CHO are the co-founders of  HospitalityEducators.com, which was created in 2010 to be a resource for hotel owners and professionals as they sought to improve market share, occupancy, operational efficiency and profitability.  The husband and wife team are transitioning the original membership site concept and evolving the business model today to a focused resource offering consulting, training, and individualized support to both hospitality and other service businesses.   Services include keynote addresses workshops, online support, metrics measurement, marketing and customer service from a group of more than a dozen experienced professionals.   While continuing to serve hospitality, the demand for these types of services is growing and can be personalized.

John Hogan is also the principal of HoganHospitality.com, which provides a range of expert professional services for hotel owners, including professional development for organizations, training, consulting and expert witness services.

Contact information:  Kathleen Hogan  480-436-0283, John Hogan 602-799-5375 or  service@hospitalityeducators.com

Keynotes: 

Recommended Reading from HospitalityEducators.com | Five Stars: Putting Online Reviews to Work for Your Business

5 starsAs a consumer, author, and educator who is on the road many weeks each year, I regularly submit online reviews. I try to be fair, honest and helpful to both the business and other consumers.

As a hotelier and professional seminar leader who works with hotel owners and managers in trying to help them improve their ratings, this book makes sense and I intend to recommend parts of it.

I find some of the book logical, but some it very repetitive. Some of the chapters are hard to follow, while others offer very specific suggestions. It has excellent insights for rookies, but some of the messages are a bit too fundamental for many businesses.

Many of the graphics and illustrations are unnecessarily too small to have much value as they are very hard to read.

It is overall a solid primer and good for businesses who are just entering the digital age. The authors do a credible job at explaining how different sites (Google + vs. Yelp vs. TripAdvisor, etc.) work and then offering ideas on how to use different approaches for these sites.

“Five Stars” authors Couzin and Grappone offer some practical answers and possible ways to make online reviews a positive marketing avenue for business.

Recommended!

Dr. John Hogan
Hospitality Educators
Hogan Hospitality

 

John Hogan       Kathleen Hogan

Hospitality.jpg

Kathleen Hogan Ireland Sept 2013John Hogan Sept 2013DSCN0215Dr. John Hogan CHA CMHS CHE CHO and Kathleen Hogan MBA CHO are the co-founders of  HospitalityEducators.com, which was created in 2010 to be a resource for hotel owners and professionals as they sought to improve market share, occupancy, operational efficiency and profitability.  The husband and wife team are transitioning the original membership site concept and evolving the business model today to a focused resource offering consulting, training, and individualized support to both hospitality and other service businesses.   Services include keynote addresses workshops, online support, metrics measurement, marketing and customer service from a group of more than a dozen experienced professionals.   While continuing to serve hospitality, the demand for these types of services is growing and can be personalized.

John Hogan is also the principal of HoganHospitality.com, which provides a range of expert professional services for hotel owners, including professional development for organizations, training, consulting and expert witness services.

Contact information:  Kathleen Hogan  480-436-0283, John Hogan 602-799-5375 or  service@hospitalityeducators.com

Keynotes: 

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