Recommended Reference from HospitalityEducators.com | Hospitality Law by Stephen Barth

A University textbook is not normally considered light reading, yet a number of them can offer us valuable information and resources.

This is a law book used in university classes. It is very detailed, includes many solid examples and case studies. The Q&A sections at the end reinforce the highlights made throughout each chapter.  The headings of the 15 chapters are self explanatory and offer insights and potential direction.

Hospitality Law

 

  1.  Prevention Philosophy
  2. Government Agencies Affecting Hospitality
  3. Business Structures
  4. Business Contracts
  5. Significant Hospitality Contracts
  6. Legally Managing Property
  7. Legally Selecting Employees
  8. Legally Managing Employees
  9. Your Responsibilities as a Hospitality Operator
  10. Your Responsibilities as a Hospitality Operator to Guests
  11. Your Responsibilities for Guest Property
  12. Your Responsibilities when Serving Food & Beverage
  13. Legal Responsibilities in Travel and Tourism
  14. Safety and Security Issues
  15. Managing Insurance

In addition to this reference book, I would also recommend The 2015 Hospitality Law Conference    http://hospitalitylawconference.com/ , which is not just for lawyers.

From development deals to management agreements, from food and beverage liability to labor and employment, and from claims management to anti-trust issues, the latest cases, trends and challenges in compliance, finance, law, risk, safety, and security are up for exploration at the 13th Annual Hospitality Law Conference, February 9-11, 2015.

The Owner Management Summit, co-located with the Hospitality Law Conference, intersects legal, finance and technology and includes sessions on: who owns the data, who is responsible for the data, development and unwinding management contracts.

I will write a separate column on this next week.

John Hogan       Kathleen Hogan

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Kathleen Hogan Ireland Sept 2013John Hogan Sept 2013DSCN0215Dr. John Hogan CHA CMHS CHE CHO and Kathleen Hogan MBA CHO are the co-founders of  HospitalityEducators.com, which was created in 2010 to be a resource for hotel owners and professionals as they sought to improve market share, occupancy, operational efficiency and profitability.  The husband and wife team are transitioning the original membership site concept and evolving the business model today to a focused resource offering consulting, training, and individualized support to both hospitality and other service businesses.   Services include keynote addresses workshops, online support, metrics measurement, marketing and customer service from a group of more than a dozen experienced professionals.   While continuing to serve hospitality, the demand for these types of services is growing and can be personalized.

John Hogan is also the principal of HoganHospitality.com, which provides a range of expert professional services for hotel owners, including professional development for organizations, training, consulting and expert witness services.

Contact information:  Kathleen Hogan  480-436-0283, John Hogan 602-799-5375 or  service@hospitalityeducators.com

Keynotes: 

Lessons in Leadership

Lessons in Leadership – By  John J.  Hogan CHA CHMS CHE  CHO

This title is not specifically referring to one company, one brand or one country in the title.

For the past five to seven years, even in a tight economy,  leading developers have been targeting previously under-served countries and the pace has hastened this past 24-36 months. (See this link for specifics)

For this lessons in leadership, I looked to the East for a different perspective and different industry.  While hospitality is not the same as manufacturing, there are parallels in certain people skills.

A former senior managing director of Toyota Motor Corporation and renowned leader of their famous manufacturing system, Masao Nemoto is known throughout the world as a leader in quality control and process optimization. In a sense, he is one of the principal architects of the “Toyota Way.”    His ideas on leadership and quality management are documented, and reveal the profound knowledge Nemoto infused into the day-to-day operations at Toyota, much the same as certain hoteliers such as Statler, Hilton, Wilson,  Johnson, Marriott, Oberoi, Sharp, Carlson, Kerzner, Forte, Ritz and others did in hotels.

Nemoto insisted on a culture of shared responsibility and he believed that critical tasks could not be left to a single business unit, but rather should be a collective responsibility. Nemoto’s point of view says that leaders must lead across the company, not just their own particular area

His beliefs went from the senior leaders all the down to the individual worker on the assembly line, where everyone speaks, insisted Nemoto, not just management. A direct result of this view is the work principle: problems must be solved at the lowest possible level. All employees take responsibility for problem solving, instead of pushing the problems or issues up the line where it likely gets choked in bureaucracy.

In my career, I have worked with and in all sizes of organizations.   I have sat in countless meetings that seem to be stalled with some regularity and have found myself wondering the same things you might be thinking today:  “Are we competing against each other or against the competition?”

Nemoto’s 10 leadership principles:

  1. Improvement after improvement. Managers should look continually for ways to improve the work of their employees. Advance is a gradual, incremental process. They should create all atmosphere conducive to improvements by others.
  2. Coordinate between divisions.Managers of individual divisions, departments, or subsidiaries must share responsibility.  A corollary of this is that upper management should not assign important tasks to only one division.
  3. Everyone speaks.This rule guides supervisors of quality circles at Toyota, ensuring participation and learning by all members. It has also been generalized to all meetings and the annual planning process. By hearing everyone’s view, upper management can create realistic plans that have the support of those who must implement them–an essential element in quality programs.
  4. Do not scold.This was an alien concept to most managers. At Toyota the policy is for superiors to avoid giving criticism and threatening punitive measures when mistakes are made. This is the only way to ensure that mistakes will be reported immediately and fully so that the root causes (in policies and processes) can be identified and amended. Assigning blame to the reporter clearly discourages reporting of mistakes and makes it harder to find the underlying cause of a mistake, but it is difficult to train managers to take this approach.
  5. Make sure others understand your work.An emphasis on teaching and presentation skills is important because of the need for collaboration. At Toyota, managers are expected to develop their presentation skills and to teach associates about their work so that collaborations will be fuller and more effective.
  6. Send the best employees out for rotation. Toyota has a rotation policy to
    train employees. There is a strong tendency for managers to keep their best employees from rotation, but the company benefits most in the long run by training its best employees.
  7. A command without a deadline is not a command. This rule is used to
    ensure that managers always give a deadline or schedule for work. Employees are instructed to ignore requests that are not accompanied by a deadline. The rationale is that without a deadline, tasks are far less likely to be completed.
  8. Rehearsal is an ideal occasion for training.Managers and supervisors give numerous presentations and reports. In a QC program there are frequent progress reports. Nemoto encouraged managers to focus on the rehearsal of reports and presentations, and to require that they be rehearsed. Rehearsal time is used to teach presentation skills and to explore problems or lack of understanding of the topic. Because it is informal, rehearsal time is better for learning.
  9. Inspection is a failure unless top management takes action.The idea
    behind this is that management must prescribe specific remedies whenever a problem is observed or reported. Delegating this task (with comments like “shape up” or “do your best to solve this problem”) is ineffective. So is failing to take any action once a problem is defined.
  10. Ask subordinates, “What can I do for you?”At Toyota this is called “creating an opportunity to be heard at the top.” In the first year of a quality-control program, managers hold meetings in which employees brief them about progress. Three rules guide these informal meetings:
  • Do not postpone the meetings or subordinates will think their project is not taken seriously.
  • Listen to the process, not just the results, since QCs focus in on the process.
  • Ask the presenters whether you can do anything for them. If they ask for help, be sure to act on the request.

If top management is perceived as willing to help with problems, employees are more optimistic about tackling the problems and will take management’s goals more seriously.

KEYS TO SUCCESS is the umbrella title for our programs, hospitality services and columns. This year’s writings focus o- a variety of topics for hotel owners, managers and professionals including both my “HOW TO” articles, HOSPITALITY CONVERSATIONS™, Lessons from the Field™, Hotel Common- Sense™ and Principles for Success

Hospitality Tip of the Week™

Focus on Continuous Improvement”

“Improvement after improvement, that has been my guiding principle in my more than three decades of service with Toyota Motors and its affiliates.”                    
Masao Nemoto, Former Managing Director, Toyota Motor Corporation

HE logoSuccess does not come by accident or chance.

Contact us for assistance.

John J. Hogan CHA CHE CHO and Kathleen Hogan  MBA CHO are the  co-founders of  HospitalityEducators.com, which was created in 2010 to be a resource for hotel owners and professionals as they sought to improve market share, occupancy, operational efficiency and profitability.

AAEAAQAAAAAAAAL2AAAAJDA0N2IzNDgzLTZkMWEtNGIwZC1hNGZlLWY5ZDgwZDAyNjdhMw  AAEAAQAAAAAAAAInAAAAJDMwNmJlN2UxLTQyYzktNDdjNC05MmRkLTc0ZjQ1ODU0NDRmZA The husband and wife team are transitioning the original membership site concept and evolving the business model today to a focused resource offering consulting, training, and individualized support to both hospitality and other service businesses.   Services include keynote addresses workshops, online support, metrics measurement, marketing and customer service from a group of more than a dozen experienced professionals.   While continuing to serve hospitality, the demand for these types of services is growing and can be personalized.

John Hogan is also the principal of HoganHospitality.com, which provides a range of expert professional services for hotel owners, including professional development for organizations, training, consulting and expert witness services.

Contact information:  Kathleen Hogan  480-436-0283,

John Hogan 602-799-5375 or service@hospitalityeducators.com

 Click    here   for Keynotes and Workshops Available 

Heaven, by Hotel Standards | Observations from a New England Hotelier

People are drawn to hotels.  There’s something about the center of activity in a busy, full service hotel that attracts people from all walks of life globally..

The Parker House hotel in Boston Massachusetts has been open continuously since 1855, and is arguably the oldest continually operating hotel in the United States.

Mark Twain stayed here for a month  in 1877 and he is but one of literally hundreds of celebrities to have made this hotel very well known and appreciated.

Heaven, by Hotel Standards is a book about the history of the Omni Parker House, with information compiled by Susan Wilson.  On page eight of this book,  there’s a wonderful welcome letter from the current general manager, John Murtha, CHA. I had the privilege of meeting John, who is a gracious hotelier.   His letter is sincere and genuine, and  the information about the service of the general managers from 1927 until today helps to demonstrate a longevity and quality of what you seldom find in most brands or hotels today.

In addition to Mark Twain, this book identifies a Who’s Who of celebrities who have been patrons of this hotel   From the age of literature there are writers like Emerson, Thoreau, Hawthorn and Longfellow.  From baseball, there are some well known names ranging from Babe Ruth to Ted Williams to Carl Yastrzemski to David Ortiz.  The hotel has been a center of  of activity in politics with people ranging from Ulysses S Grant, Mayor James Michael Curley, Franklin Delano Roosevelt, John F. Kennedy, Colin Powell, Bill Clinton and most recently, and former Governor Deval Patrick as guests.  Boston has a strong theatrical presence in the theater district and hosted a wide range of prominent actors including John Wilkes Booth (of Lincoln assassination infamy)  Sarah Bernhardt, as well as more contemporary entertainers as Joan Crawford, Judy Garland, James Dean, Stevie Nicks, Yo Yo Ma , Rachel Raye and Ben Affleck.

The hotel itself was built by Harvey Parker, who relocated from his family farm in Maine.  The Parker family arrived in America in the 1630s and Harvey did not want to remain in agriculture.  After number of years in Paris, he arrived in Boston and began his first venture into the hospitality business with a restaurant.  The book does a balanced review, explaining the evolution of the family from the restaurant business and to finding a location for and building what became the Parker house.

The Parker House has had a long time reputation for food and hospitality.  It is credited with creating or perfecting Boston Cream pie, lemon meringue pie, Boston Scrod and of course, the Parker House Rolls.  The book shares an anecdote about Eleanor Roosevelt looking and her request for the recipe, which had been a well kept secret until that request in 1933.

Celebrity chefs at this hotel have included television personalities Emeril Lagasse, Bobby Flay and Martha  Stewart who all wanted to link their reputation with that of the well-known Parker House.  There are stories in the book of organic farming from local farms, orchards and dairies 100 years before organic cooking became popular in the rest of the world.

The Saturday Club was a literary discussion group and included Henry David Thoreau, Henry Longfellow, John Greenleaf Whittier, diplomat Charles Francis Adams, Dr. Oliver Wendell Holmes and many others, who enjoyed the culinary service and hospitality of the Parker house once a month for a number of years.  Charles Dickens resided in the Parker house during his 1867-68 lecture tour.

The Parker house is located  across the street from the old Boston City Hall and  is two blocks from the state capitol.  Every US president from Grant to Clinton stayed at this hotel at some point during their presidency.  The book and movie the Last Hurrah was based on the experiences and activities of longtime mayor James Michael Curley.  The Kennedy family were regular visitors to the hotel and former Speaker of the House, Tip O’Neal is pictured in the book’s preface.

There are interesting interviews with longtime staff and stories about the wonderful jazz greats who performed at this hotel over the years. Some of the staff during the  mid 20th century  included Malcolm X and Ho Chi Min, who worked in the kitchens.

The book also discusses the business aspects of the hotel.  In the chapter called Architecturally Speaking, there are detailed explanations of the transitions and how the hotel evolved and maintained its presence.  There were major changes in operations and styles, with a series of owners over a 50 year period.  Downtown Boston today is very successful for hotels, but hotels were not considered to have a good location downtown in the late 1950s through mid seventies and the Parker House suffered. It did recover with the New England Dunfey family acquisition and management, The Parker House today is an example of exceptional hotel keeping with the Omni name and ownership.

Many grand old hotels today have reputations of ghosts, and the Parker House is no exception.  There are amusing stories of possible sightings from hotel founder Harvey Parker to Charles Dickens. We will have to decide for ourselves if this is fact or fiction.

Pages 105 to 107 lists of dozens of well-known names who enjoyed the hospitality of the Parker House from Mohammed Ali to the Who.

——————————————————————————————————————–

I began my career as a New England hotelier, working in Vermont and Massachusetts, including at the 1500 room Sheraton Boston.   I worked for the Dunfey Hotels when they owned the Parker House and was interviewed for the #2 manager position.   A crisis at the Dunfey Hotel I was managing in Atlanta prevented that transfer, but I do recall the elegance and history of this fine hotel.  I would have enjoyed being part of the history of this fine hotel.

The title of the book is Heaven, By Hotel Standards, and it is certainly an interesting snapshot of successful and innovative Boston hotel keeping over three centuries

Strongly recommended.

John J Hogan CHA CMHS CHE CHO

HospitalityEducators
Hogan Hospitality

Success does not come by accident or chance.

Contact us for assistance.

Hospitality.jpg

Kathleen Hogan Ireland Sept 2013John J. Hogan CHA CHE CHO and Kathleen Hogan  MBA CHO are the  co-founders of  HospitalityEducators.com, which was created in 2010 to be a resource for hotel owners and professionals as they sought to improve market share, occupancy, operational efficiency and profitability.

The husband and wife team are transitioning the original membership site concept and evolving the business model today to a focused resource offering consulting, training, and individualized support to both hospitality and other service businesses.   Services include keynote addresses workshops, online support, metrics measurement, marketing and customer service from a group of more than a dozen experienced professionals.   While continuing to serve hospitality, the demand for these types of services is growing and can be personalized.

John Hogan is also the principal of HoganHospitality.com, which provides a range of expert professional services for hotel owners, including professional development for organizations, training, consulting and expert witness services.

John Hogan Sept 2013DSCN0215

Contact information:  Kathleen Hogan  480-436-0283,

John Hogan

602-799-5375 or service@hospitalityeducators.com

Workshops Available include: 

From the Chalkboard to the Front Line

What They Don’t Teach You at Hotel School

Focus:

  • Hotel Profitability
  • Hotel Sales
  • Marketing Ideas
  • Hotel Operations

There will always be an ongoing debate on the comparative merits of experience versus the knowledge acquired in formal educational settings.   The best lessons anyone can learn from hotel schools include an awareness of what really occurs on the front line in the actual hospitality setting.  This keynote transitions the academic message to the real world of running a profitable hospitality business.

 Click    here   for Keynotes and Workshops Available 

The Soft Edge | Recommended Reading from HospitalityEducators.com | Where Great Companies Find Lasting Success

 

The Soft Edge: Where Great Companies Find Lasting Success 

Rich Karlgaard

Soft Edge

I have likely read several hundred business books over the years, and approach each new one carefully.  While I am not in technology and am not drawn usually to books using it as the base, this book offers solid insights for including soft edge values into business culture.

The Soft Edge Values are

  1. Trust
  2. Smarts
  3. Teams
  4. Taste and
  5. Story

The author Rich Karlgaard discusses each in some detail, offering specific examples from different types of organizations.  These do not seem to be business school case studies, but real world, understandable stories.

When the news continues to dwell on the banking  and government abuses (including technology short cuts, legal or otherwise), this book about something other than hard data is refreshing.

Much of what is  published in the business press the last 10 years tends to  praise the “hard line edge” of business, even though so many of the staff in those companies are chewed up.  This book instead offers   observations and awareness about building trust and loyalty in business.  It offers solid examples and  case studies that reveal insights that came primarily from not start-ups that may or may not last, but from proven successes  that demanded  refinement, good judgment, and consideration to others.

Highly Recommended!

 

John J. Hogan   CHA CHMS CHE CHO

Hospitality Educators                 Hogan Hospitality

 

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Kathleen Hogan Ireland Sept 2013John J. Hogan CHA CMHS CHE CHO and Kathleen Hogan MBA CHO are the co-founders of  HospitalityEducators.com, which was created in 2010 to be a resource for hotel owners and professionals as they sought to improve market share, occupancy, operational efficiency and profitability.

The husband and wife team are transitioning the original membership site concept and evolving the business model today to a focused resource offering consulting, training, and individualized support to both hospitality and other service businesses.   Services include keynote addresses workshops, online support, metrics measurement, marketing and customer service from a group of more than a dozen experienced professionals.   While continuing to serve hospitality, the demand for these types of services is growing and can be personalized.

John Hogan is also the principal of HoganHospitality.com, which provides a range of expert professional services for hotel owners, including professional development for organizations, training, consulting and expert witness services.

John Hogan Sept 2013DSCN0215

Contact information:  Kathleen Hogan  480-436-0283, John Hogan 602-799-5375 or  service@hospitalityeducators.com

Workshops Available: 

 Lessons From the Field:   A Common Sense Approach to Effective Hotel Sales 

A to Z Steps to Profits

45 Proven Ways to Succeed in Hospitality in Any Economy

Hotel Sales Action Steps to Succeed – Anytime, Anywhere 

10 Hotel Mistakes to Avoid in Selling 

An Insight from HospitalityEducators.com and Young Hoteliers | A YouTube Smile

The 1st quarter of what WAS a new year is about wrap up.   We have likely all experienced certain successes and disappointments over the last quarter (and year)  and are looking forward to renewed enthusiasm .

Will the next quarter automatically bring changes? Of course it will , but changes are neither positive or negative until they are acted on.  Where do those changes come from?

To those of us under 40 years of age, we have had the habit of being able to or at times forced to follow the ideas and direction of those older and we hope, wiser for their experience.   For those of us over 40, we are expected to share some of our knowledge and at the same time, acknowledge that the next generation will have some exceptional ideas, energy and momentum that we should tap into.

In our HospitalityEducators.com training and certification programs, we rely on the balance offered by blended learning.   This approach includes case studies, some lecture from experienced faculty, substantial interaction in group discussions and videos.  Participants in our programs often span three generations of professionals looking to improve their professionalism and we are always looking for ways to make learning more enjoyable.

One You Tube that I often use was one created by and brought to us all by attendees at the The Young Hoteliers Summit.   This now annual Young Hoteliers Summit in 2014 had delegates and team members that came together from 26 schools, spanning 5 continents and 15 nationalities. Their energy and enthusiasm showed they were HAPPY, as can be seen in this short message!   We use it after lunch to get people re-energized and to see that ‘We are Happy’ is a mind set.

The Young Hoteliers Summit has a serious side and acts towards improving professional opportunities for young talent in hospitality. It is the first entirely student focused and student run hospitality summit, designed to reduce the gap between the key stakeholders — industry, academic institutions and students from leading hotel management schools around the world. Creating a platform for knowledge and idea exchange, networking opportunities and a friendly competition, it works to foster a dialogue on employment related topics between these stakeholders.

The 2nd video shows the business side of the event.

While I have not yet attended this Summit, I recognize the zeal and intensity of all who participate, regardless of age or country or any other descriptor.  We all need to learn how to be energized, motivated, focused and HAPPY.

The 2015 Summit is fast approaching and this year’s attendees know what they are looking forward to.

Do you?

.John Hogan       Kathleen Hogan

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Kathleen Hogan Ireland Sept 2013John Hogan Sept 2013DSCN0215Dr. John Hogan CHA CMHS CHE CHO and Kathleen Hogan MBA CHO are the co-founders of  HospitalityEducators.com, which was created in 2010 to be a resource for hotel owners and professionals as they sought to improve market share, occupancy, operational efficiency and profitability.  The husband and wife team are transitioning the original membership site concept and evolving the business model today to a focused resource offering consulting, training, and individualized support to both hospitality and other service businesses.   Services include keynote addresses workshops, online support, metrics measurement, marketing and customer service from a group of more than a dozen experienced professionals.   While continuing to serve hospitality, the demand for these types of services is growing and can be personalized.

John Hogan is also the principal of HoganHospitality.com, which provides a range of expert professional services for hotel owners, including professional development for organizations, training, consulting and expert witness services.

Contact information:  Kathleen Hogan  480-436-0283, John Hogan 602-799-5375 or  service@hospitalityeducators.com

Keynotes: 

 

90 Days to Success in Sales| Recommended Reading by HospitalityEducators.com

90 days to sales success

When I review and read a business book, I tend to compartmentalize it for content, approach, flow and conclusion. In this book, the author has generally done a solid job of planning, relating and summarizing the intent and value to be found in the work.

Overall, I believe this is a solid reference for someone who is new to selling, regardless of age. It has substance for those in career change situations, as well as those just entering the field from college. Hoxie asserts throughout the book that being a professional and successful sales professional is an ongoing commitment to building rapport, honest customer relationships and follow through.

The book is broken into 15 main topics areas
1. Sales basics
2. Initial prospecting
3. Initial sales meetings
4. Presentations, solutions
5. Closing
6. Objections
7. Goal setting
8. Continual prospecting
9. Industry specifics
10. The life of a salesperson
11. Sales management
12. Retail sales
13. Your 90 day plan
14. Beyond 90 days
15. Thirty three AST (I will not give the abbreviations away, but they are right on)

Hoxie properly opines that not all sales jobs are worth taking and that are clear benefits and downsides in selling. Each chapter covers a particular topic and offers suggestions and ideas. I do not totally understand the sequence of certain chapters, but that is the author’s perspective. It did seem the title of the book (90 day plan) would be introduced before the next to last chapter, but it does share some good concepts.

This book is very detailed and structured and I believe most readers will appreciate the easy to follow case studies and the pros and cons that are included along the way. The action steps offered are also a positive addition to this kind of book, as they could help guide readers in a week by week channel of activities.

The chapter on objection handling with specific phrases (“I’m on a budget,” “I need to ask….,” or “Can’t you do better on price” etc.) is an excellent practice field for almost anyone , with are scripted answers that could help the novice or uncertain person.

There are industry specific Q&A’s on selling advertising, real estate, services and different kinds of products. Hoxie highlights the common error in sales and marketing of focusing too much time and money on new potential clients, rather than appreciating the existing base.

I recommend this as A Solid Work for Those New to Sales

John J. Hogan CHA CMHS CHE CHO
HoganHospitality
HospitalityEducators

Hospitality.jpg

Kathleen Hogan Ireland Sept 2013

John J Hogan CHA CMHS CHE CHO and Kathleen Hogan MBA CHO are the co-founders of HospitalityEducators.com, which was created in 2010 to be a resource for hotel owners and professionals as they sought to improve market share, occupancy, operational efficiency and profitability.

 

The husband and wife team are transitioning the original membership site concept and evolving the business model today to a focused resource offeringJohn Hogan Sept 2013DSCN0215 consulting, training, and individualized support to both hospitality and other service businesses.   Services include keynote addresses workshops, online support, metrics measurement, marketing and customer service from a group of more than a dozen experienced professionals.   While continuing to serve hospitality, the demand for these types of services is growing and can be personalized.

John Hogan is also the principal of HoganHospitality.com, which provides a range of expert professional services for hotel owners, including professional development for organizations, training, consulting and expert witness services.

 

Contact information:  Kathleen Hogan  480-436-0283, John Hogan 602-799-5375 or  service@hospitalityeducators.com

Workshops Available: 

 Lessons From the Field:   A Common Sense Approach to Effective Hotel Sales 

A to Z Steps to Profits

45 Proven Ways to Succeed in Hospitality in Any Economy

Hotel Sales Action Steps to Succeed – Anytime, Anywhere 

10 Hotel Mistakes to Avoid in Selling 

A reminder to us all from HospitalityEducators.com: PAY IT FORWARD all year! Reflections – People Who Make A Difference

As hoteliers and restaurateurs, we are involved in our communities as service providers, active citizens, employers, tax payers, and more.

Hotels are open 24/7, 365 days per year.   Most restaurants (in hotels or freestanding) usually serve at least 2 meals per day and are open on most holidays and days when other businesses may have the opportunity to allow their staff family time.

The title of this blog is PAY IT FORWARD all year!     As active members of the hospitality industry, many of us participate in a number of community goodwill services.   We share quality but unsold prepared food with food banks and shelters.  We recycle our linens to charities that find people who can use them.   Rather than make a little change, we will donate the furniture that has been replaced during renovations to a range of services that uses them productively.   We and our staff volunteer in our community.

The end of the year holidays always generate news stories and this year is no different.

This short article is not political and there is no hidden message in it.

2014 has not been a good year for law enforcement officers, as noted in this 2 minute CBS Sunday morning report from 12/14.   The following video shares a variation on a theme we have heard for years- Secret Santa – and how it represented a way for a sampling of the overwhelming numbers of good officers who are never in the news to help share.

The message is self explanatory and the need is year round.    We encourage everyone in hospitality to continue what you already do and see if you can expand it by 10% in 2015.

If you are just getting started, see what your own staff and local local community needs and act accordingly.

The message is not about Santa or just giving money – the intent of this anonymous donor is to get everyone reaching out and talking again with each other.

Hospitality.jpg

Kathleen Hogan Ireland Sept 2013John Hogan Sept 2013DSCN0215Dr. John Hogan CHA CMHS CHE CHO and Kathleen Hogan MBA CHO are the co-founders of  HospitalityEducators.com, which was created in 2010 to be a resource for hotel owners and professionals as they sought to improve market share, occupancy, operational efficiency and profitability.  The husband and wife team are transitioning the original membership site concept and evolving the business model today to a focused resource offering consulting, training, and individualized support to both hospitality and other service businesses.   Services include keynote addresses workshops, online support, metrics measurement, marketing and customer service from a group of more than a dozen experienced professionals.   While continuing to serve hospitality, the demand for these types of services is growing and can be personalized.

John Hogan is also the principal of HoganHospitality.com, which provides a range of expert professional services for hotel owners, including professional development for organizations, training, consulting and expert witness services.

Contact information:  Kathleen Hogan  480-436-0283, John Hogan 602-799-5375 or  service@hospitalityeducators.com