Training and Development – A self-analysis | Guest Blog from HospitalityEducators.com

Training and Development – A self-analysis

Place a check mark beside each of the answers that in your opinion are true or false.

1. As long as I know what the department’s goals are, my employees only need to know what’s involved in their own jobs. True____ False____

2. All employees should be able to work well with all other employees. True____ False____

3. Our department’s goals and the methods for reaching them should come from upper-level managers.  True____ False____

4. Employees know when they’ve met their goals and when they haven’t. They don’t have to be told.  True____ False____

5. Trainers can encourage teamwork through training employees to keep the sales department up-to-date regarding special events they learn about within the community.
True____ False____

6. Trainers can encourage teamwork, by training employees to ask guest to tell housekeeping about needed repairs or cleaning problems. True____ False____

7. Trainers can encourage teamwork through encouraging employees to learn the hours of operation and the location of restaurants, lounges, health clubs, and other areas at the property so that they can help guests enjoy everything the property has to offer. True____ False____

8. A strategic training plan should be separate from the organization’s strategic plan. True____ False____

9. In general, adult learners tend to be more focused on the big picture, contributing to the betterment of the organization as a whole. True____ False____

10. In general, adult learners tend to be more focused on the practicality of learning, such as why it is needed, how it will be used, and how the individual will benefit.
True____ False____

11. In conducting training sessions with adult learners in the hospitality industry, trainers may experience more success by relating the training directly to the workplace with examples and role-plays.  True____ False____

12. The primary purpose of a cost-benefit analysis is to determine whether the skills and knowledge gained in the training have transferred back to the workplace. True____ False____

13. Common methods for identifying an organization’s training needs include conducting employee surveys, reviewing guest comments, and performing job analyses.
True____ False____

Jennifer Calhoun MBA, CHE | Founding Associate, HospitalityEducators.com
This assessment is not designed to give a score, but rather to identify areas that are already strong and others that could use additional focus.
Jennifer is currently a graduate student pursuing a PhD degree in Hospitality Management at Auburn University. Her research focus is on sustainability.   

 She was the Program Director for the Hospitality and Tourism Institute at Prince Georges Community College where she was responsible for leadership, program planning, marketing, recruiting, and determining the Institute’s goals and curriculum development priorities. Her responsibilities also included, identifying staffing, facilities, equipment and supply needs while ensuring high-quality instruction for programs that served the hospitality and tourism industry. She was the primary liaison in cultivating and maintaining mutually beneficial relationships with businesses, government agencies, and professional associations.

In 2010, HTI received the Maryland Tourism Education Foundation Award given at the Maryland Tourism and Travel Summit in Annapolis and Jennifer received ,“The Lamp of Knowledge Award for United States Educator,” from the American Hotel and Lodging Educational Institute (AH&LEI).

Rules of Engagement: Fair and Firm | Guest Blog from HospitalityEducators.com

Rules of Engagement: Fair and Firm

author/source: Dr. Marc Clark, President & CEO SmartBizzOnline.com

If you have any workplace rules, regulations, policies and/or procedures there’s a good probability that sooner or later they will be broken by one or more of your workers and that you may have to step up and enforce those company standards with some form of discipline.

Discipline doesn’t necessarily mean automatic termination. One has to first gather all the facts, investigate their credibility and then issue a consequence that is fair to the infraction. Hopefully your business has a written set of standards, employee handbook, and established Code of Conduct to provide you assistance in such matters (and to assist in creating consistency and continuity in the way you deal with people).

Discipline should be administered in a four step process, in a progressive manner. First infraction the employee should receive a verbal warning, Step #1, discussing the problem and expectations of eliminating the problem. However this discussion with the employee will be documented on a formal company disciplinary report and filed in the employee’s personnel folder.

If the undesirable behavior continues Step #2 is administered, the “Written Warning”. The employee’s behavior is documented and a discussion with warning in hand is conducted. Within this written warning the verbal warning is noted. The conversation held with the employee at this level is more serious and accountability is stressed. At this level the employee should have a clear understanding that any continuance of the unacceptable behavior will lead up to either Suspension, Step #3 or Termination, Step #4.

The employee must be consciously aware that it will be their conduct that will generate the final decision and outcome as to what will happen to them because of their behavior. They in essence choose their destiny and supervision will be administering their choice.

Employees should always be given the opportunity to provide their side of the story during a disciplinary action. In Steps, 2, 3, and 4, comment space should be provided the employee on the disciplinary form itself. Also for these three steps of discipline, supervision should request that the employee sign the disciplinary form. However it should be noted that signing the form does not mean that the employee agrees with what is written on the form but that the form and its contents has been reviewed and that a copy of the disciplinary report has been given to the employee. Should the employee refuse to sign, supervision should document this employee refusal and have it witnessed by a third party, preferably another supervisor.

In all but the most serious cases, you’ll want to try to avoid terminating employees, especially if they are good workers. In fact, terminating a worker without some form of discipline policy and procedure could cause you some form of legal problem especially if any form of discrimination can be justified. Without a clear policy and verification that the policy was used for the terminated employee, you could end up in a “your word against the employee’s” situation. It is always a good practice to permit employees to respond to disciplinary counseling, either verbally or in writing. By permitting the employee to respond, managers often can defuse a potentially explosive state of affairs.

Here are some things to ponder as you prepare your company’s discipline policy and procedure process:
Setting up a structured and fair discipline program gives you some background on the philosophy and the goals of a discipline program. It also explains progressive discipline and what a discipline program should contain. Remember that discipline means something more than just punishment. It also supports the idea of training that is expected to produce a specific character or pattern of behavior that will produce moral and mental improvement. Discipline aids in providing a systematic method to obtain obedience.

Employees’ complaints assists you in dealing with employees’ complaints and guides you though the process of setting up a program and a policy to manage these complaints.

Performing an investigation and an inquiry tells you what to do once a grievance has been received and details the steps you need to take in appraising the situation. In order for a disciplinary program to be successful, this step must be mastered by all those administering it. From top down it should be implemented in a consistent manner.

Dealing with difficult employees will help you with the most challenging part of the discipline process – actually confronting the employee. You will need to make decisions about whether to coach or council an employee and how to go about doing it fairly and without bias.

Proper documentation of disciplinary actions is a significant part of the discipline process that must be done accurately to protect your business and substantiate any actions you take against employees. All disciplinary decisions should be made on a business decisions and not personal decisions.

Share your thoughts with Dr. Clark at drmarc@smartbizzonline.com

Discipline doesn’t necessarily mean automatic termination. One has to first gather all the facts, investigate their credibility and then issue a consequence that is fair to the infraction. Hopefully your business has a written set of standards, employee handbook, and established Code of Conduct to provide you assistance in such matters (and to assist in creating consistency and continuity in the way you deal with people).

Recruiting Strategies in Hiring and Retaining Employees | Guest Blog – HospitalityEducators.com

The need to hire an employee can arise from various events such as voluntary or involuntary termination, increased workload, or restructuring of a department or position, resulting in the need for additional skills and/or abilities that current employees do not possess.

Needs Assessment
The first step in the recruitment process should be to evaluate the need to hire a new employee. In the case of an opening resulting from a termination, the company should consider:

  •  Whether the job responsibilities of that opening can be absorbed by other positions.
  •  Whether the position should be eliminated.
  •  Changing the position to a part-time or temporary status.
  •  Restructuring the department to accommodate the changes without adding staff.

Record Keeping
It is critical to maintain accurate records of the requirements for the open position (i.e., a current job description), recruitment methods used, applications received, candidates interviewed, candidate selected and reason for selection.

In the event that a claim is filed against a company for discriminatory hiring practices, the records mentioned above will provide evidence of the valid selection criteria used by the company to make their hiring decision. In order to reduce the risks of discriminatory hiring practices, companies should use a variety of recruitment strategies.

Recruitment Program
A successful recruitment program will ensure a good pool of qualified candidates to choose from. This will increase the chances of selecting an individual with the skills, knowledge and abilities to become a successful employee and a valuable asset to your company. The quality, not quantity, of applicants should be the focus of the recruiting process.

All individuals who will be involved in the selection process must have a clear understanding of the essential functions of the job and the qualifications required to successfully perform the job.

Recruitment Strategies
In developing an effective recruitment strategy, consideration should be given to company and
affirmative action goals and objectives and should be tailored to the companies needs. This can be accomplished by:

  • Identifying and projecting staffing needs by department.
  • Developing a budget to support projected recruitment activity for the year.
  • Developing formal written procedures for the recruiting process to include job requisition forms accompanied by a current job description.
  •  Making sure that everyone who might have contact with a prospective candidate is aware of and trained on Equal Employment Opportunity Commission requirements and restrictions.
  •  Using various recruitment techniques, rather than a single method.
  •  Identifying the internal and external recruitment methods, which will be most effective in attracting qualified candidates.

Attracting qualified candidates can be challenging and often requires creativity and planning. When selecting a recruitment strategy, the following factors should be considered:

  •  The company location.
  •  Labor market conditions.
  •  Level of the position to be filled.
  •  Pay and benefits.
  •  Company promotion policies.
  •  Time and budget constraints.
  •  Affirmative action goals.
  •  Labor union obligations (if any).
   Dr. Marc Clark, CHA, CHRE, CHE, CHO, President & CEO at SmartBizzOnLine.com

Understanding the legal and ethical obligations in the hiring and retention process of hospitality industry staff requires focused efforts and responsible follow-through by managers at multiple levels.  

Recommended Reading from HospitalityEducators.com | Way of the Peaceful Warrior: A Book That Changes Lives

Insightful – this makes one think

Way of the Peaceful Warrior: A Book That Changes Lives

This is not a new book, and there are literally 100s of reviews so there is not a need to try to be all revealing in an assessment of the plot or flow of the book.

This book is exceptional for us when we find ourselves in a place when we need to renew our focus and direction. For example, p 104 has a dialogue about overhauling ourselves. It identifies that we are a “tangled mass of twisted circuits and outmoded programs…..” In these days of information overload (and much of it of questionable value) , that assessment has merit – IF we stop to think about where we are in life individually.

The movie (which included one of Nick Nolte’s best performances ever) was good, but the details in the book are much deeper and allow the reader to pay attention to the feelings and discussions in our own head.

Page 166 shares a fable about two monks on a journey. In less than one page, there is a lesson about what causes so many of us unnecessary trouble – A LACK OF FOCUS. The lesson is to keep our attention in the present moment – this does not mean to stop planning ahead, but to focus on the NOW in order to reach our goals.

Well done! Highly recommended

Dr. John Hogan CHA CHE CHO
Hospitality Educators
Hogan Hospitality

Success does not come by accident or chance.

Contact us for assistance.

John.Hogan@HospitalityEducators.com or 602-799-5375

HospitalityEducators.com was created to help hospitality businesses address problems via a training and information resource site to help you increase your Hotel’s revenue, market share and profitability.  With more than 2,000 pages of tips, guides, best practices, strategies, plans, budgets, videos and resources, HospitalityEducators.com is the #1 independent website for hotel owners and managers.  This site can help you solve your problems now!      Read More  

KEYS TO SUCCESS  is the umbrella title for my ongoing programs, hospitality services and columns. This year’s writings focus on a variety of topics for hotel owners, managers and professionals including both my “HOW TO” articles, HOSPITALITY CONVERSATIONS™, Lessons from the Field™, Hotel Common Sense™ , THE P-A-R PRINCIPLE™  and Principles for Success.

Feel free to share an idea for a column at john.hogan@hospitalityeducators.com   anytime or contact me regarding consulting, customized workshops, speaking engagements … And remember – we all need a regular dose of common sense,


 John Hogan is a successful hospitality executive, educator, author and consultant.

 

He is available as a keynote speaker and seminar leader and has led more than 4,800 programs in his career at many hospitality industry events and classes. He is CEO and Co-Founder of HospitalityEducators.com , which delivers focused and affordable counsel in solving specific challenges facing hospitality today. HospitalityEducators.com   offers a wide range of information, forms, best practices and ideas designed to help individual hoteliers and hospitality businesses improve their market penetration, deliver service excellence and increase their profitability.

.HoganHospitality.com
Your Hospitality Resource for the Hotel Owner, Innkeeper, Manager and Hospitality Industry Associations.

Seven Sure-Fire Ways to Keep Talented Part-Timers | Guest Blog from HospitalityEducators.com

A Guest Blog from a Founding Associate of HospitalityEducators.com

Seven Sure-Fire Ways to Keep Talented Part-Timers

  • Orient them as to their role on the team. Make them feel as if they are fulltimers.
  • Make sure they are included in all recognition and reward programs.
  • Be sensitive to their requested schedules. They are part-timers for a reason.
  • Provide first-class, ongoing, quality training.
  • Place PTs on decision-making committees and have them participate on all employee committees.
  • Provide them with thought-provoking work and task assignments.
  • Treat as family, with respect and integrity.

Dr. Marc Clark, CHA, CHRE, CHE, CHO
 President & CEO at SmartBizzOnLine.com

Toss Out Useless Paperwork in Hospitality Businesses

Principles for Success

Toss Out Useless Paperwork in Hospitality Businesses

by Dr. John Hogan, CHA CHE CMHS CHO          

Ten possible rules for streamlining office systems, whether they are computer generated or created on paper by individuals

Some potential items for consideration, whether you are the “chief” officer in management, marketing, finances or human resources, might include:

  1. Always question the traditional assumption – “we have always done it that way”. The question becomes “why?
  2. Evaluate the purpose and use of all time sensitive reports. These include forecasts going forward and aging reports looking backward.
  3. Define the problem before deciding a solution – this may sound a bit silly, but determine bottlenecks, and ROI before adding more reports.
  4. Ask the right people the right questions in evaluating the value and use of reports.
  5. Keep paperwork simple and understandable in language and use. If the report topic is complex, the cover sheet should be fundamental.
  6. Information and reports are only of value if people understand their value. That means training, discussion and usefulness.
  7. Enforce the system – the new, simpler reports must be submitted, reviewed and discussed on time. Consistently.
  8. Monitor information systems and always look for improvements.
  9. Remember hospitality is supposed to include and focus on service and high touch. Do not overlook the value of training and service issues in reports and measurement. This should include senior level management proactively interacting
  10. Reports and paperwork are important components of systems, but systems need to be kept in perspective

If you would like more details on this, send a note to john.hogan@hospitalityeducators.com

What are you doing at your hotel, restaurant or hospitality business?

Hospitality Tip of the Week®: “Manage Systems. Lead People. Coach Your Team.

Be a Real Mentor.”       John Hogan, Hotel Common Sense® # 13

Getting the Most out of Your Franchise Investment – Making Hospitality More Profitable Part of the  Keys To Success Workshop Series

KEYS TO SUCCESSis the umbrella title for our programs, hospitality services and columns. This year’s writings focus on a variety of topics for hotel owners, managers and professionalsincluding “HOW TO” articles, HOSPITALITY CONVERSATIONS®, Lessons from the Field®, Hotel Common Sense® and Principles for Success

Feel free to share an idea for a column at anytime or contact me regarding consulting, customized workshops, speaking engagements … And remember – we all need a regular dose of common sense.

John Hogan is a successful hospitality executive, educator, author and consultant and is a frequent keynote speaker and seminar leader at many hospitality industry events. He is Co-Founder of a consortium (www.HospitalityEducators.com) of successful corporate and academic professionals delivering focused and affordable counsel in solving specific challenges facing hospitality today.

www.HospitalityEducators.com is a membership site offering a wide range of information, forms, best practices and ideas designed to help individual hoteliers and hospitality businesses improve their market penetration, deliver service excellence and increase their profitability. Individuals wishing to contribute materials may send themKathleen@HospitalityEducators.com. Special pricing is in effect for a limited time that also includes a complimentary copy of LESSONS FROM THE FIELD- A COMMON SENSE APPROACH TO EFFECTIVE HOTEL SALES.

Consulting Expertise and Research Interest

  1. Sales Management and training
  2. Turn-around and revenue management
  3. Professional Development for the Organization and the Individual
  4. Customer Service
  5. Making Cultural Diversity Real
  6. Developing Academic Hospitality programs
  7. Medical Lodging Consulting

If you need assistance in any of these areas or simply an independent review or opinion on a hospitality challenge, contact me directly for a prompt response and very personalized attention.

www.HoganHospitality.com

Your Hospitality Resource for the Hotel Owner, Innkeeper, Manager and Hospitality Industry Associations

http://www.linkedin.com/in/drjohnhoganchache

CONTACT

Dr. John Hogan, CHE CHA CMHS CHO

United States – Phoenix, Phone: 602-799-5375

www.hoganhospitality.com/ Email: info@hoganhospitality.com

Reflections on K C Ptomey: Providing Room for All at the Table

“Auld Lang Syne” is a Scots poem written by Robert Burns in 1788 and set to the tune of a traditional folk song. It is well known in many countries, especially (but far from exclusively) in the English-speaking world; its traditional use being to celebrate the start of the New Year at the stroke of midnight.

The sentiment of the song also provides us with the opportunity to reflect on those who have passed on and left us this year.

KC Ptomey was the head minister at Westminster Presbyterian Church in Nashville for more than 25 years. He passed away in May 2013.KC Ptomey

I knew him for 17 years in a number of roles but had not been in contact with him for several years, as I had moved 2500 miles away and we all know about distance.  I was saddened when my daughter (who had also moved to another state) called and shared the sad news.

I read online one of the eulogies shared by one of his colleagues, Theodore Wardlaw of Texas.    Wardlaw shared a sentiment that was so expressive of KC – that of sharing.      K C was planning his seventieth birthday party and the news from his oncologist advised him it was likely his last. The birthday was to be at a rented beach house in North Carolina and KC advised his friend of the most important requirement for the house on that beach.   It had to have a table large enough to seat eleven people.  He wouldn’t consider extending the length with a card table or two, lest anyone there feel like second-class citizens; no, the table had to be large enough for at least 11 people, with space underneath for two dogs.

KC was a great storyteller and his sermons were to the point, meant to be relevant and meaningful to the person hearing it.   He was a great listener and made everyone feel included, even if he might not be in agreement with a particular issue.

Being the head minister in a large church for 25+ years has made some people vain or egotistical, but KC remained true to his beliefs and avoided the pitfalls.    Another story shared in this eulogy was one I had never heard from KC, which was like him because he remained grounded. This was a different story about “Providing Room for All at the Table.”

From the Wardlaw eulogy         It happened  in the early 1960’s in Memphis.   These were still days of deeply-defended segregation in the South, and many churches there had strict policies against welcoming people of color to worship.  Lines were deeply drawn between the white establishment and the other races; but change was in the air. One Sunday, three white students at Southwestern College at Memphis—what became Rhodes College—went with African American students to worship at Second Presbyterian Church, the largest and most powerful Presbyterian church in town.  These three students went with three students of color on a Sunday morning to worship at that church, and at the doors of that church, they were all turned away.  It was church policy.  Almost immediately, the story hit the Associated Press and the United Press International, and it ricocheted around the country and across our communion.  The Presbyterian General Assembly was to have had its annual meeting at that church in the following year, and, because of this story’s power, leaders in our communion elected another venue for the General Assembly. 

 A historian who recounted this story said that it was huge in those days to defy the cultural norms like that.  “These young men were bravely defiant,” he said.  “They risked their necks; they could have been beaten up.”  Yet all three of those white students were formed by that moment.  Each one went on to go to seminary and to become Presbyterian ministers, and one of those students was K.C. Ptomey.  Even as a college student, he had to do something; because the table wasn’t large enough.

The Presbyterian Church is one with a history back to Scotland , so you can see the link to “Auld Lang Syne”. Many Presbyterian denominations work together with other Reformed denominations of other traditions, and KC was always one to reach out to as many people as possible.

KC’s commitment to the philosophy of a large enough table was central to his being.   I appreciated his values, his intellect, his sense of fair play and more.  Thank you for your commitment to so many people, so many times.

Success does not come by accident or chance.

Contact us for assistance.

John.Hogan@HospitalityEducators.com or 602-799-5375

HospitalityEducators.com was created to help hospitality businesses address problems via a training and information resource site to help you increase your Hotel’s revenue, market share and profitability.  With more than 2,000 pages of tips, guides, best practices, strategies, plans, budgets, videos and resources, HospitalityEducators.com is the #1 independent website for hotel owners and managers.  This site can help you solve your problems now!      Read More  

KEYS TO SUCCESS  is the umbrella title for my ongoing programs, hospitality services and columns. This year’s writings focus on a variety of topics for hotel owners, managers and professionals including both my “HOW TO” articles, HOSPITALITY CONVERSATIONS™, Lessons from the Field™, Hotel Common Sense™ , THE P-A-R PRINCIPLE™  and Principles for Success.

Feel free to share an idea for a column at john.hogan@hospitalityeducators.com   anytime or contact me regarding consulting, customized workshops, speaking engagements … And remember – we all need a regular dose of common sense,


 Dr. John Hogan CHA CHE Oct 2010 MinneapolisJohn Hogan is a successful hospitality executive, educator, author and consultant and is a frequent keynote speaker and seminar leader at many hospitality industry events. He is CEO and Co-Founder of www.HospitalityEducators.com , which delivers focused and affordable counsel in solving specific challenges facing hospitality today.

www.HospitalityEducators.com  is a membership site offering a wide range of information, forms, best practices and ideas designed to help individual hoteliers and hospitality businesses improve their market penetration, deliver service excellence and increase their profitability.

www.HoganHospitality.com
Your Hospitality Resource for the Hotel Owner, Innkeeper, Manager and Hospitality Industry Associations.