The Heart of Hospitality Remains Service | A Reminder to us all from HospitalityEducators.com

Lobby

The Heart of Hospitality Remains Service

by  John J. Hogan, CHA, CHE, CMHS CHO

Co-Founder HospitalityEducators.com and Principal of HoganHospitality.com

Hospitality and tourism arguably make up the world’s largest industry. They play a major role in the world economy and  contribute significant revenues and net wealth to many countries. When we think about it, we recognize that many components of hospitality are based heavily on the personal, “high touch” side of life.

It was a number of years ago that I first learned anything about hotels and hospitality when a high school friend’s family bought a seasonal resort. That family did not remain in the industry, but I learned from another family of hoteliers in that same location about the many disciplines in hospitality.

In our careers, we understand that the need to learn purchasing protocols, how to interpret and anticipate market trends, and keeping current with legal and safety requirements is essential. We recognize that we must evolve with technology, that we must address revenue management, and provide meaningful training to our staff if we expect them to meet the expectations of guests in our facilities.

The hotel industry has evolved significantly in many aspects during the past 20 years. Energy awareness and sustainability are now essential factors in both construction and ongoing operations. Purchasing, design, event planning and sales have changed dramatically. Innovations in culinary offerings have extended to creatively serve groups of all sizes in restaurants, conference centers and banquet events. Entertainment options in clubs, pubs and arenas have grown enormously, as has the need to be more attentive to security in a changing world.

The physical buildings have evolved and range from mega-hotels with casinos in certain markets to bed and breakfasts in communities of all sizes. There are now properties of all sizes and configurations at airports, in mixed use buildings, attached to convention halls, on converted ships, in secondary and tertiary cities and many other conversions and forms.

These hospitality offerings and hotels today are owned and managed by a wide array of groups, ranging from individuals to multinational corporations, Real Estate Investment Trusts and single industry companies of all sizes. Many are franchised; some are managed by individuals, some by third parties and others by family units. Properties can range from a ten-room country inn to a 2,000-room property on the ocean or in a city center attached to a municipal convention center.

While much has changed in hospitality, on reflection we still note that the experience element of hospitality depends not on the size or ownership of a hotel or restaurant, but on the personal, “high touch” delivery individually provided by hospitality staff to guests – one on one.

I recall somewhat “bragging” to the founding partners of the family business mentioned earlier how much I was learning at the large multinational hotel company that had hired me out of hotel school into a management training program in their 1500-room flagship hotel. They smiled and said that I could learn from the major companies how to follow the large company rules and be part of a major corporation, but I probably would not learn how to be a host or a real innkeeper profitably. Those skills and competencies would be developed through time and hands-on experience. I gained what I felt were incredibly important perspectives and experiences in those seasons and something else that I feel I did not learn at university or at big corporate hotels, either. That something was the need to apply innkeeper and host common sense to formulas, percentages, calculations and protocols.

Many brands today have customer service programs and some are quite good in their advertising value and in general guest satisfaction. Those programs may or may not exceed the guest’s expectations or hopes and that is why it is so critical for hospitality associates to truly “care” about their guests. It remains up to each individual hotel associate to deliver that exceptional “one-on-one” experience.

There is not one single, guaranteed way to deliver service.

  • There are many private companies, such as ours  HospitalityEducators.com and HoganHospitality.com that have unique programs already developed and ready to customize.
  • A good percentage of the major brands have different types of customer service templates and programs.
  • The American Hotel & Lodging Educational Institute has a guest service training program, The Guest Service Gold Program,  that shows employees and properties how to achieve a new standard of exceptional service based on emotionally engaging with guests in memorable ways.

Choose the approach or program that works for you, but remember that it is service that builds loyalty and that loyalty is what leads to long term success! 

John J. Hogan   CHA CHMS CHE CHO

Hospitality Educators                 Hogan Hospitality

Hospitality.jpg

 John J. Hogan CHA CMHS CHE CHO and Kathleen Hogan MBA CHO are the co-founders of HospitalityEducators.com, which was created in 2010 to be a resource for hotel owners and professionals as they sought to improve market share,occupancy, operational efficiency and profitability.

Kathleen Hogan Ireland Sept 2013Dr. John Hogan CHA CHE CHMS CHO

The husband and wife team are transitioning the original membership site concept and evolving the business model today to a focused resource offering consulting, training, and individualized support to both hospitality and other service businesses.   Services include keynote addresses workshops, online support, metrics measurement, marketing and customer service from a group of more than a dozen experienced professionals.   While continuing to serve hospitality, the demand for these types of services is growing and can be personalized.

John Hogan is also the principal of HoganHospitality.com, which provides a range of expert professional services for hotel owners, including professional development for organizations, training, consulting and expert witness services.

Contact information:  Kathleen Hogan  480-436-0283, John Hogan 602-799-5375 or  service@hospitalityeducators.com

Click here for Keynotes and Workshops Available 

Advertisements

Training and Development – A self-analysis from HospitalityEducators.com


HospitalityEducators.com has a wide range of checklists and forms that address operations, marketing, training, purchasing, management, front desk and other areas.  This short sample from one of the Founding Associates is provided as a quick check of how you feel you and your staff are meeting each other’s expectations.

| Hospitality and Tourism Institute) | Prince George’s Community College | | Largo, Maryland

TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT – A SELF ANALYSIS

Place a check mark beside each of the answers that in your opinion are true or false.

1. As long as I know what the department’s goals are, my employees only need to know what’s involved in their own jobs.    True____ False____

2. All employees should be able to work well with all other employees.                            True____ False____

3. Our department’s goals and the methods for reaching them should come from upper-level managers.  True____ False____

4. Employees know when they’ve met their goals and when they haven’t. They don’t have to be told.  True____ False____

5. Trainers can encourage teamwork through training employees to keep the sales department up-to-date regarding special events they learn about within the community.
True____ False____

6. Trainers can encourage teamwork, by training employees to ask guest to tell housekeeping about needed repairs or cleaning problems. True____ False____

7. Trainers can encourage teamwork through encouraging employees to learn the hours of operation and the location of restaurants, lounges, health clubs, and other areas at the property so that they can help guests enjoy everything the property has to offer. True____ False____

8. A strategic training plan should be separate from the organization’s strategic plan. True____ False____

9. In general, adult learners tend to be more focused on the big picture, contributing to the betterment of the organization as a whole. True____ False____

10. In general, adult learners tend to be more focused on the practicality of learning, such as why it is needed, how it will be used, and how the individual will benefit.
True____ False____

11. In conducting training sessions with adult learners in the hospitality industry, trainers may experience more success by relating the training directly to the workplace with examples and role-plays.  True____ False____

12. The primary purpose of a cost-benefit analysis is to determine whether the skills and knowledge gained in the training have transferred back to the workplace. True____ False____

13. Common methods for identifying an organization’s training needs include conducting employee surveys, reviewing guest comments, and performing job analyses.
True____ False____

_________________

HospitalityEducators.com was created for the operational managers
 of hotels and restaurants.

 Our Mission Statement

HospitalityEducators.com is a consortium of successful corporate and academic professionals, who are committed to delivering focused and affordable counsel in solving specific challenges facing the hospitality industry.

Our services are designed to help individual hoteliers and groups of hotels improve their market penetration, deliver service excellence and increase their profitability.

Sign Me Up!

____________________________________________________________

Dr. John Hogan CHA CHE, working with clients at a recent program

John Hogan is a successful hospitality executive, educator, author and consultant and is a frequent keynote speaker and seminar leader at many hospitality industry events.  He is Co-Founder of a consortium (www.HospitalityEducators.com) of successful corporate and academic mentors delivering focused and affordable counsel in solving specific challenges facing the hospitality industry. www.HospitalityEducators.com is a membership site offering a wide range of information, forms, best practices and ideas that are designed to help individual hoteliers and hospitality businesses improve their market penetration, deliver service excellence and increase their profitability.

Special   pricing is in effect for a limited time that also includes a complimentary copy of LESSONS FROM THE FIELD- A COMMON SENSE APPROACH TO EFFECTIVE HOTEL SALES.  If readers would like to contribute to the site, please submit your material for consideration to Kathleen@hospitalityeducators.com.  We are interested in expanding our global networks and resources as we support our membership.

What’s the Problem™? Solving them with solutions from HospitalityEducators.com

What’s the Problem™?

Too small a budget to find new hotel and hospitality marketing approaches or are there options?

We have all seen good ideas at various businesses we interact with, yet we seldom think about ways we might make them work at our hospitality businesses.

Action Steps

  1. Look at this short video and ask your team at the next meeting to identify three ideas from companies they interact with.
  2. Create a mini contest among the team and introduce at least two ideas this month from the best of their suggestions.
  3. In less than six months, you could have as many as a dozen new approaches in operations, marketing, purchasing or training that could cost little more than time.

WHAT’S THE PROBLEM™?   is a new section at www.HospitalityEducators.com addressing specific problems that launched in late March 2011.    This feature will share specific problems submitted by members and readers or identified from HospitalityEducators.com associates’ consulting.

The problem will be stated in industry terms and there will be at least one potential solution discussed.

WHAT’S THE PROBLEM™?  will be open to visitors and members.

More detailed options and responses will be in the MEMBERS ONLY section titled                 “The Solution Is™”

Sign Me Up!

These areas will include input from a wide range of hospitality professionals from all portions of the industry.  If you would like to participate, please contact John.Hogan@hospitalityeducators.com

Feel free to share an idea for a column at info@hoganhospitality.com anytime or contact me regarding consulting, customized workshops, speaking engagements … And remember – we all need a regular dose of common sense.

John Hogan is a successful hospitality executive, educator, author and consultant and is a frequent keynote speaker and seminar leader at many hospitality industry events.  He is Co-Founder of a consortium (www.HospitalityEducators.com) of successful corporate and academic professionals delivering focused and affordable counsel in solving specific challenges facing hospitality today.

www.HospitalityEducators.com is a membership site offering a wide range of information, forms, best practices and ideas designed to help individual hoteliers and hospitality businesses improve their market penetration, deliver service excellence and increase their profitability. Individuals wishing to contribute materials may send them to  Kathleen@HospitalityEducators.com. Special pricing is in effect for a limited time that also includes a complimentary copy of LESSONS FROM THE FIELD- A COMMON SENSE APPROACH TO EFFECTIVE HOTEL SALES.

Consulting Expertise and Research Interest

  1. Sales Management and training
  2. Turn-around and revenue management
  3. Professional Development for the Organization and the Individual
  4. Customer Service
  5. Making Cultural Diversity Real
  6. Developing Academic Hospitality programs
  7. Medical Lodging Consulting

If you need assistance in any of these areas or simply an independent review or opinion on a hospitality challenge, contact me directly for a prompt response and very personalized attention.

www.HoganHospitality.com

Your Hospitality Resource for the Hotel Owner, Innkeeper, Manager and Hospitality Industry Associations

http://www.linkedin.com/in/drjohnhoganchache

CONTACT

Dr. John Hogan, CHE CHA CMHS     United States – Phoenix, Phone: 602-799-5375

www.hoganhospitality.com/ Email: info@hoganhospitality.com