How to Use Hospitality Consultants Effectively

My greatest strength as a consultant is to be ignorant and ask a few questions”
Peter F. Drucker, (1909- 2005) American Educator and Author

While Peter Drucker was not specifically a hospitality consultant, his contributions to both the “people and the process “components of business consulting are enormous and lasting, as evidenced by his significant works and books.

In a  column  I wrote several years ago, I shared a number of observations I made while I was conducting a multi-city series of programs on optimizing meetings success for Meetings Quest , when it was owned and managed by co-founder Barbara Cox-Dunn. http://www.meetingsquest.com/ . Today it is owned and managed by  Schneider Publishing

The observations I shared were about the stimulating and interactive discussions held on ways to optimize meeting success from various perspectives of professional meeting planners and hotels. Almost 50% of the time for the program was committed to small group discussions on problems facing all of these professionals in the same industry, but that have slightly different roles and responsibilities. Attendees comprise professional meeting planners from corporations and associations of every size, hotel managers and sales teams, representatives from convention and visitors’ bureaus, suppliers that serve all of the previous groups and independent professionals in the hospitality business.

I wrote the column, titled “5 Reasons Using A Qualified Consultant Could Make a Huge Difference in Your Hospitality Business” because there was such extensive cross-fertilizing of ideas and solutions among participants in the discussions mentioned above.

I also received a number of emails on the column, including this one: “ Having been both an exec using advice from consultants and now a consultant myself, I can only fully subscribe John Hogan’s comments and five reasons for a (good and qualified) consultant. I would like to add a sixth reason: The consultant is not emotionally involved and can thus provide very objective reasoning for a specific business situation.  John F. Edmaier CMM.”

Comments from other readers and attendees at the above-mentioned sessions generally complimented the potential value of consultants, but there was also caution sheared that consultants could also be a source of negativity if not used properly and effectively, as evidenced in this tongue in cheek “motivational message” from http://www.despair.com.

Consulting
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This message paints the negative image of consulting, as that of people who “hang around until” it may be too late. When a project nears completion, new troubles seem to inexplicably appear. Those challenges could be in staffing, communication, technology, equipment or distribution of global reservations. Each challenge extends the consultant’s assignment and before you know it, the financial and time costs for the consultant’s services affect your income statement in an unexpected way.

To avoid this danger, I offer the following : Five Considerations in Hiring a Hospitality Consultant.

I don’t believe in just ordering people to do things. You have to sort of grab an oar and row with them.”   Harold S. Geneen, American Executive and CEO (1959-1977) of ITT, then parent company of Sheraton Hotels

I was a management trainee at the 1500 room Sheraton Boston Hotel near the end of Geneen’s affiliation with Sheraton. He was known as a taskmaster, but he also had the reputation for involvement with identifying problems and solutions.

1. Involve key staff. Staff buy in is critical when deciding to engage the services of a consultant The danger of failure grows enormously unless key associates are involved in the decision making process of hiring a consultant. I have seen organizations that did not take this proactive approach, and the resentment or negativity can torpedo the project before it really begins.

2. Set specific and clear expectations. Responding to RFPs and making effective presentations is one thing, but those proposals may not include measurable outcomes or results. Expectations should have clear and defined deliverables, including time and expense details.

3. Establish Accountability for each phase of a consultant’s time and interaction. Consultants may research, discuss and seek to get buy-in on solutions, but they cannot execute the final plan for an organization. It is therefore essential to identify those steps and actions the consultant is responsible and accountable for.

4. Define levels of authority. A consultant according to Drucker’s quote is one who asks questions and then shares counsel. Hospitality businesses, hotels and restaurants can receive exceptional counsel from consultants, but one should not allow them to run your hospitality business unless that was part of the expectations and accountability mentioned above. They probably do not know your hospitality business as well as or better than you do. They may have recommendations that can help you and your team, but senior management and/or ownership should stay involved in the process if you retain a consultant.

5. Match your needs with the specific consultant for your assignment. By this, I mean to be certain you retain the correct individual, as well as company (if applicable). Someone with exceptional credentials as a chef may not be able to design your dining room layout. Success as a sales manager in select markets may not translate into global marketing planning. Running accounting department receivables does not mean the same thing as effectively managing cash flow in tough economic times. If applicable, you might ask questions such as:

  •  What were the largest revenues they personally oversaw?
  •  how many people were on their staff?
  •  What was the turnover rate?
  •  Were they ever entrepreneurs who had to meet their own payroll?
  •  Did they ever have to pay their own business and property taxes, or did they rely on others?
  •  Other questions unique to your situation

There are advantages to both specialists and generalists in consultants, attorneys, doctors and other professionals. We are probably familiar with the expression to “walk the talk”. For purposes of this discussion, this means having personally handled similar challenges facing your hospitality business. My personal experience in retaining or serving as a consultant is to understand and match situations on a case by case situation.

Most consultants have some hospitality industry background but may have never owned their own business. They may have never owned or sold their own hospitality business prior to becoming consultants and do not understand the stress and pressures of operating a family owned business, as are so many hospitality businesses.

Consultants can be excellent resources. Use them effectively, by choosing wisely.

Keys to Success Hospitality Tip of the Week: Focus on Continuous Learning
Hotel Common Sense Philosophy #11 “DARE TO FAIL!”
John J. Hogan, CHA CHE CMHS CHO

part of the 15 Timeless Philosophies In Hospitality, A Keynote Address and Workshop

KEYS TO SUCCESS is the umbrella title for my current programs, hospitality services and columns. This year’s writings will focus on a wide variety of topics for hotel owners, managers and professionals including both my “HOW TO” articles and HOSPITALITY CONVERSATIONS. My segments Lessons from the Field, Hotel Common Sense and Principles for Success will be featured at appropriate times in the year as well.

Success does not come by accident or chance.

Contact us for assistance.

Hospitality.jpg

Kathleen Hogan Ireland Sept 2013John J. Hogan CHA CHE CHO and Kathleen Hogan  MBA CHO are the  co-founders of  HospitalityEducators.com, which was created in 2010 to be a resource for hotel owners and professionals as they sought to improve market share, occupancy, operational efficiency and profitability.

The husband and wife team are transitioning the original membership site concept and evolving the business model today to a focused resource offering consulting, training, and individualized support to both hospitality and other service businesses.   Services include keynote addresses workshops, online support, metrics measurement, marketing and customer service from a group of more than a dozen experienced professionals.   While continuing to serve hospitality, the demand for these types of services is growing and can be personalized.

John Hogan is also the principal of HoganHospitality.com, which provides a range of expert professional services for hotel owners, including professional development for organizations, training, consulting and expert witness services.

John Hogan Sept 2013DSCN0215

Contact information:  Kathleen Hogan  480-436-0283,

John Hogan

602-799-5375 or service@hospitalityeducators.com

Workshops Available include: 

From the Chalkboard to the Front Line

What They Don’t Teach You at Hotel School

Focus:

  • Hotel Profitability
  • Hotel Sales
  • Marketing Ideas
  • Hotel Operations

There will always be an ongoing debate on the comparative merits of experience versus the knowledge acquired in formal educational settings.   The best lessons anyone can learn from hotel schools include an awareness of what really occurs on the front line in the actual hospitality setting.  This keynote transitions the academic message to the real world of running a profitable hospitality business.

 Click    here   for Keynotes and Workshops Available 

http://www.HoganHospitality.com
Your Hospitality Resource for Hotel Owners, Innkeepers, Managers and Associations

Pete Drucker Books

Prepared by the Office of Marketing & Communications at Claremont Graduate University 165 E. Tenth St., Claremont, Calif. 91711 909-621-8028

 The End of Economic Man – 1939
 The Future of Industrial Man – 1942
 Concept of the Corporation – 1946
 The New Society – 1950
 The Practice of Management – 1954
 America’s Next Twenty Years – 1957
 Landmarks of Tomorrow – 1957
 Managing for Results – 1964
 The Effective Executive – 1966
 The Age of Discontinuity – 1968
 Technology, Management and Society – 1970
 Men, Ideas and Politics – 1971Management: Tasks, Responsibilities, Practices – 1973
 The Unseen Revolution – 1976 (reissued in 1996 as The Pension Fund Revolution)
 People and Performance: The Best of Peter Drucker on Management – 1977
 An Introductory View of Management – 1977
 Adventures of a Bystander – 1978 (autobiography)
 Song of the Brush: Japanese Painting from the Sanso Collection – 1979
 Managing in Turbulent Times – 1980
 Toward the Next Economics and Other Essays – 1981
 The Changing World of the Executive – 1982
 The Last of All Possible Worlds – 1982 (novel)
 The Temptation to Do Good – 1984 (novel)
 Innovation and Entrepreneurship – 1985
 Frontiers of Management – 1986
 The New Realities: in Government and Politics, in Economics and Business, in Society and World View – 1989
 Managing the Nonprofit Organization: Principles and Practices – 1990
 Managing for the Future – 1992
 The Ecological Vision – 1993Post-Capitalist Society – 1993
Managing in a Time of Great Change – 1995
 Drucker on Asia: A Dialogue between Peter Drucker and Isao Nakauchi –1997
 Peter Drucker on the Profession of Management – 1998
 Management Challenges for the 21st Century – 1999
 The Essential Drucker – 2001
 Managing in the Next Society – 2002
 A Functioning Society – 2002
 The Daily Drucker – 2004
 The Effective Executive In Action – 2006

90 Days to Success in Sales| Recommended Reading by HospitalityEducators.com

90 days to sales success

When I review and read a business book, I tend to compartmentalize it for content, approach, flow and conclusion. In this book, the author has generally done a solid job of planning, relating and summarizing the intent and value to be found in the work.

Overall, I believe this is a solid reference for someone who is new to selling, regardless of age. It has substance for those in career change situations, as well as those just entering the field from college. Hoxie asserts throughout the book that being a professional and successful sales professional is an ongoing commitment to building rapport, honest customer relationships and follow through.

The book is broken into 15 main topics areas
1. Sales basics
2. Initial prospecting
3. Initial sales meetings
4. Presentations, solutions
5. Closing
6. Objections
7. Goal setting
8. Continual prospecting
9. Industry specifics
10. The life of a salesperson
11. Sales management
12. Retail sales
13. Your 90 day plan
14. Beyond 90 days
15. Thirty three AST (I will not give the abbreviations away, but they are right on)

Hoxie properly opines that not all sales jobs are worth taking and that are clear benefits and downsides in selling. Each chapter covers a particular topic and offers suggestions and ideas. I do not totally understand the sequence of certain chapters, but that is the author’s perspective. It did seem the title of the book (90 day plan) would be introduced before the next to last chapter, but it does share some good concepts.

This book is very detailed and structured and I believe most readers will appreciate the easy to follow case studies and the pros and cons that are included along the way. The action steps offered are also a positive addition to this kind of book, as they could help guide readers in a week by week channel of activities.

The chapter on objection handling with specific phrases (“I’m on a budget,” “I need to ask….,” or “Can’t you do better on price” etc.) is an excellent practice field for almost anyone , with are scripted answers that could help the novice or uncertain person.

There are industry specific Q&A’s on selling advertising, real estate, services and different kinds of products. Hoxie highlights the common error in sales and marketing of focusing too much time and money on new potential clients, rather than appreciating the existing base.

I recommend this as A Solid Work for Those New to Sales

John J. Hogan CHA CMHS CHE CHO
HoganHospitality
HospitalityEducators

Hospitality.jpg

Kathleen Hogan Ireland Sept 2013

John J Hogan CHA CMHS CHE CHO and Kathleen Hogan MBA CHO are the co-founders of HospitalityEducators.com, which was created in 2010 to be a resource for hotel owners and professionals as they sought to improve market share, occupancy, operational efficiency and profitability.

 

The husband and wife team are transitioning the original membership site concept and evolving the business model today to a focused resource offeringJohn Hogan Sept 2013DSCN0215 consulting, training, and individualized support to both hospitality and other service businesses.   Services include keynote addresses workshops, online support, metrics measurement, marketing and customer service from a group of more than a dozen experienced professionals.   While continuing to serve hospitality, the demand for these types of services is growing and can be personalized.

John Hogan is also the principal of HoganHospitality.com, which provides a range of expert professional services for hotel owners, including professional development for organizations, training, consulting and expert witness services.

 

Contact information:  Kathleen Hogan  480-436-0283, John Hogan 602-799-5375 or  service@hospitalityeducators.com

Workshops Available: 

 Lessons From the Field:   A Common Sense Approach to Effective Hotel Sales 

A to Z Steps to Profits

45 Proven Ways to Succeed in Hospitality in Any Economy

Hotel Sales Action Steps to Succeed – Anytime, Anywhere 

10 Hotel Mistakes to Avoid in Selling 

The Practical Side of SWOT : HospitalityEducators.com changes Business Model #1 | A statement of teaching philosophy

HospitalityEducators.com changes Business Model #1

  A statement of teaching philosophy

HospitalityEducators.com was created in 2010 to be a resource for hotel owners and professionals as they sought to improve market share, occupancy, operational efficiency and profitability.

The original business model we used was that of a membership organization, and our success included readers and members from all six continents and more than 50 countries.   When we evaluated our progress in our business plan mid -year, we realized that our business model was becoming more like a magazine which had never been our intent.

The annual SWOT analysis showed us that we were not focusing on what had been our passion and goals, so we elected to move our business model from the membership site to a resource for both hospitality and other service businesses.

This is the 1st of 3 explanations of how our business model is evolving over the next several months.

Our strengths include a network of professionals who have interacted with and assisted a number of service businesses through teaching and training.  To that end, we are pleased to share

A statement of teaching philosophy for HospitalityEducators.com

tech

 

Our philosophy of teaching includes fostering self-instruction, formulating questions rather than just giving answers and establishing high expectations. Professors have limited capacity to teach students anything – they primarily motivate students to teach themselves. Our principal pedagogical role is to help students learn how to search for a complete answer as we work through the question-and-answer process of real world scenarios. Our goal is to stimulate active learning and acceptance with the idea that being “wrong” is part of learning. 

teach“There is nothing so useless as doing efficiently that which should not be done at all.”

Peter Drucker (1909-2005),  Author  

Our role as the instructor is not only a source of knowledge, but also a source of support and an avenue for other resources. Students can expect that we are approachable, available to answer questions, and genuinely invested in their academic success.

“It’s not hard to make decisions when you know what your values are.”

Roy Disney, American Film Writer

We are firm believers in active learning, and we try to maintain a very interactive classroom. Teaching is not about lecturing to students; it is about presenting theories, concepts, and questions to students in ways they can incorporate into their own life experience or goals.teaching

It should be the goal of every student and professor to increase knowledge and understanding in both the classroom and the real world. Group interaction is an important part of learning, so that all parties share ideas, argue or validate them with others and practice teamwork as an important link in social and mental development.

real world 

“A company culture cannot be imposed or training classmandated. It must grow from within over a long period.”

Isadore Sharp, Founder Four Seasons Hotels

 

Teaching is an opportunity to inspire and empower.  Our teaching philosophy is based around concepts that bridge and link academic programs to real world situations.

 

  1. Strategic planning

continuos learning

  1. Continuous Learning

 

  1. Individualization      Achievement  in       “Real World” applications These real world scenarios offer solid and practical links to the academic work in      the class.

 Corporate Teaching Philosophy phi symbol

 “Education’s purpose is to replace an empty mind with an open one.”      

Malcolm S. Forbes, Publisher, Entrepreneur (1919-1990)

The global community is changing at a record pace and recognizing and responding to emerging opportunities is critical.  Keeping focused on achieving agreed upon results requires open, honest, consistent and transparent communication.silver puzzle

The Founders of HospitalityEducators.com careers have always had strong ties to academic integrity, including service as an adjunct professor at different institutions.  Additional commitment to learning was delivered to other Institutes and Universities through research and recommendations on curriculum and program specifications for hospitality programs. 

Our role as corporate and academic educators in the business world has provided us with individuals who continuously challenge us to seek better and more effective ways to reach the desired goals.  We want to challenge others to likewise achieve more from themselves and from others.

As a teacher and as a business professional, one lesson learned from mentors was critical thinking.  In a world changing at incredible speeds, this competency is invaluable.   Interdisciplinary study lends itself to more creative thought development. 

“Success is the result of perfection, hard work, learning from failure, loyalty, and persistence.”                   

 Colin Powell, American Secretary of State

Defining Successsuccess

  1. Successful graduates of balanced programs learn certain academics but also have embraced the need to learn certain life lessons, such as the Seven Habits of Highly Successful People.
  2. Successful innovators and professionals need to develop strong competencies as a leader, a relationship builder, a problem solver and eventually a mentor.

As faculty members , the range of experience and exposure to the industry can be huge, especially if dealing with introductory courses. We set different learning objectives for the level of the course and the student likely to be taking it.

  1. to fully explore the range of career options available in the field of business
  2. to provide the appropriate level of information and tools needed to help in the student’s understanding of this class to the options available in business and/or hospitality
  3. to share real world experiences and examples by a professional who is passionate about what he does

‘It’s fine to celebrate success but it is more important to heed the lessons of failure.”

Bill Gates ,  Founder of Microsoft)

Blended Learning

Learning occurs as a progression but that process is not uniform with each student.  In our careers, we have come to the realization that students learn from us and from each other, but that we also learn from them in this fast-paced world. By sharing with them my teaching objectives and experience, students know that we are genuinely interested in them.

 

Expert professional training and consulting services for hotel owners.

Success does not come by accident or chance.

Contact us for assistance.

John.Hogan@HospitalityEducators.com or 602-799-5375

HospitalityEducators.com was created to help hospitality businesses address problems via a training and information resource site to help you increase your Hotel’s revenue, market share and profitability.  With more than 2,000 pages of tips, guides, best practices, strategies, plans, budgets, videos and resources, HospitalityEducators.com is the #1 independent website for hotel owners and managers.  This site can help you solve your problems now!      Read More  

KEYS TO SUCCESS  is the umbrella title for my ongoing programs, hospitality services and columns. This year’s writings focus on a variety of topics for hotel owners, managers and professionals including both my “HOW TO” articles, HOSPITALITY CONVERSATIONS™, Lessons from the Field™, Hotel Common Sense™ , THE P-A-R PRINCIPLE™  and Principles for Success.

Feel free to share an idea for a column at john.hogan@hospitalityeducators.com   anytime or contact me regarding consulting, customized workshops, speaking engagements … And remember – we all need a regular dose of common sense,


 Dr. John Hogan CHA CHE Oct 2010 MinneapolisJohn Hogan is a successful hospitality executive, educator, author and consultant and is a frequent keynote speaker and seminar leader at many hospitality industry events. He is CEO and Co-Founder of www.HospitalityEducators.com , which delivers focused and affordable counsel in solving specific challenges facing hospitality today.

www.HospitalityEducators.com  is a membership site offering a wide range of information, forms, best practices and ideas designed to help individual hoteliers and hospitality businesses improve their market penetration, deliver service excellence and increase their profitability.

www.HoganHospitality.com
Your Hospitality Resource for the Hotel Owner, Innkeeper, Manager and Hospitality Industry Associations.

HospitalityEducators.com Recommended Reading | Getting to More Without Settling for Less

Scaling Up Excellence:

Getting to More Without Settling for Less

download

 

by Robert I. Sutton and  Huggy Rao

Over the past 30 years, I have lost track of how many business, process improvement and quality assurance books I have read (or in too many cases, tried to read but had to put down because of lack of substance.)

I have also learned that sometimes book reviews can be short and to the point, as is this one.

Many of those business authors  look for the latest fad, add some diagrams and fill pages with the trendy new buzzwords. This book is a rewarding exception to that approach, as it is a breath of fresh air that examines proven approaches to business and develops those ideas.

I have worked for large international companies , mid size and family owned companies, as well as entrepreneurial launches and this well researched book offers some excellent insights.  Scaling Up Excellence includes strategies on to help both people and their organizations focus on what should be the most important for the longest and time and how to be GREAT at it! The illustrations make sense that one can learn from.

This book is neither easy or hard to read, but it does require some thinking and assessment of the authors’ 7 Principles for achieving and maintaining excellence.

Highly Recommended!

Hospitality.jpg
Dr. John Hogan CHA CMHS CHE CHO
Hospitality Educators
Hogan Hospitality

Kathleen Hogan Ireland Sept 2013John Hogan Sept 2013DSCN0215Dr. John Hogan CHA CMHS CHE CHO and Kathleen Hogan MBA CHO are the co-founders of  HospitalityEducators.com, which was created in 2010 to be a resource for hotel owners and professionals as they sought to improve market share, occupancy, operational efficiency and profitability.  The husband and wife team are transitioning the original membership site concept and evolving the business model today to a focused resource offering consulting, training, and individualized support to both hospitality and other service businesses.   Services include keynote addresses workshops, online support, metrics measurement, marketing and customer service from a group of more than a dozen experienced professionals.   While continuing to serve hospitality, the demand for these types of services is growing and can be personalized.

John Hogan is also the principal of HoganHospitality.com, which provides a range of expert professional services for hotel owners, including professional development for organizations, training, consulting and expert witness services.

Contact information:  Kathleen Hogan  480-436-0283, John Hogan 602-799-5375 orservice@hospitalityeducators.com

 

Recommended Reading from HospitalityEducators.com – From Hotels to HTMLs

 

From Hotels to HTMLs: A Complete Guide to Internet Marketing for the Lodging Industry by Anil Aggarwal, Benu Aggarwal
” 5.0 out of 5 stars On Target!,

This one-of-a-kind book offers practical, proven information for hotel professionals on all aspects of Internet marketing, which hoteliers can use to improve their revenue and online presence.

All the strategies illustrated – from traditional search engine marketing to mobile, social media, e-mail, and website optimization – have been successfully deployed to create good return on investment for client hotels of Milestone Internet Marketing.

The book provides practical tips in easy-to-understand language, and offers nearly a dozen handy checklists to monitor a property’s Internet marketing progress.

I have watched the author’s progress in helping hoteliers the past ten years and I extend her our compliments.

Dr. John Hogan CHA CHE CMHS
HospitalityEducators
Hogan Hospitality

Success in hotels and hospitality does not come by accident or chance.

We can help

John.Hogan@HospitalityEducators.com or 602-799-5375

 

HospitalityEducators.com was created to help hospitality businesses address problems via a training and information resource site to help you increase your Hotel’s revenue, market share and profitability.  With more than 2,000 pages of tips, guides, best practices, strategies, plans, budgets, videos and resources, HospitalityEducators.com is the #1 independent website for hotel owners and managers.  This site can help you solve your problems now!      Read More  

KEYS TO SUCCESS  is the umbrella title for our programs, hospitality services and columns. This year’s writings focus on a variety of topics for hotel owners, managers and professionals including both my “HOW TO” articles, HOSPITALITY CONVERSATIONS™, Lessons from the Field™, Hotel Common Sense™ , THE P-A-R PRINCIPLE™  and Principles for Success.

Feel free to share an idea for a column at john.hogan@hospitalityeducators.com   anytime or contact me regarding consulting, customized workshops, speaking engagements … And remember – we all need a regular dose of common sense,


 Dr. John Hogan CHA CHE Boston Dec  2010

John Hogan is a successful hospitality executive, educator, author and consultant and is a frequent keynote speaker and seminar leader at many hospitality industry events. He is CEO and Co-Founder of HospitalityEducators.com , which has more than 2000 resource pages and has become the #1 independent website for hotel owners and managers. He is also the Principal of HoganHospitality.com, which offers hotel expert witness services and hospitality consulting.

Contact us for assistance – John.Hogan@HospitalityEducators.com 602-799-5375 HoganHospitality.com : john@hoganhospitality.com

KEYS TO SUCCESS is the umbrella title for our programs, hospitality services and columns. This year’s writings focus on a variety of topics for hotel owners, managers and professionals including both my “HOW TO” articles, HOSPITALITY CONVERSATIONS™, Lessons from the Field™, Hotel Common Sense™, THE P-A-R PRINCIPLE™ and Principles for Success.